Bryan Fletcher, Taylor Fletcher

U.S. Olympians keeping an eye on tonight’s Big Game

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Before representing their country in Sochi, lots of Team USA athletes will take time out from last-minute preparations (or get them out of the way beforehand) to watch tonight’s Super Bowl XLVIII between the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks.

As you’d figure considering that the U.S. Olympic Training Center is a little more than an hour south of Denver in Colorado Springs, Colorado, there’s a healthy group of Colorado Olympians on the 2014 U.S. Olympic Team – 19 in all.

Two of them are the Fletcher brothers, Bryan and Taylor (pictured), who will be competing in the Nordic combined event that gets started Feb. 12.

The Steamboat Springs natives are massive Broncos fans and both of them have packed Broncos gear for their trip to Sochi – and, naturally, both of them think Denver will be victorious.

“I will have my Champ Bailey jersey, old-school Broncos hat and Broncos beanie,” Taylor said to TeamUSA.org. “If things are going well, the jersey will be taken off and put on the couch and the baseball cap comes on! I don’t believe I am superstitious.”

Bryan said that he’ll have a “lucky Mile High Salute t-shirt” to wear as he watches the game while traveling in the early morning hours “because jet lag will probably kick in.”

As for the eight-person Washington Olympian contingent, short track skater and ‘Hawks fan J.R. Celski (a native of nearby Federal Way, Wash.) is likely more than ready to cheer his team on.

Celski received perhaps the biggest honor a Seattle football fan can have in 2010, when he was chosen to raise the 12th Man flag before a game at the noise factory that is CenturyLink Field.

Perhaps he’ll be watching the Super Bowl with eight-time Olympic medalist and NBC Olympics’ own Apolo Anton Ohno, who was born in Federal Way.

“We will be watching the game at the hotel or IBC (International Broadcast Center) or maybe in the mountains via streaming content on my iPad :-),” Ohno said in the same TeamUSA.org piece. “Excited for the big game! Have friends who play on the Broncos and obviously my team is the Seahawks.”

Former Bills, Packers wide receiver makes U.S. Olympic Team

Qatar’s Barshim sets season’s best high jump record in Birmingham

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Qatar’s Mutaz Essa Barshim, who astonished the track and field world with his non-traditional hurdling technique on his way to becoming the reigning world champion in high jump this August, one-upped himself in Birmingham when he soared over the bar set to 2.40 meters. That’s just a smidge over 7 feet, 10 inches!

The men’s outdoor high jump world record is currently 2.45m, set by Cuba’s Javier Sotomayor in 1993.

At the 2017 Worlds, the 6-foot-2 Barshim cleared the bar at about 6 feet, 4 inches with his now famous feet-first maneuver.

At Birmingham’s Diamond League event his technique may have been conventional, but his final leap was no less breathtaking.

After trading jumps with Syria’s Majed Aldin Ghazal up to 2.35m, Ghazal decided to bow out, but the Qatari continued on. With the meet already won, Barshim raised the bar to 2.40m.

“I knew I had that jump in me but I needed that pressure on my shoulders,” Barshim said. “I love it here. I had the [meet] record here from 2014 and I also won in Birmingham last year so it is a lucky place for me.”

The 2.40m final jump for Barshim registered as a meet and season record. After climbing down off the landing pad, Barshim’s fellow jumping competitors mobbed him in celebration.

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MORE: Great Britain’s Mo Farah races and wins final track race in home country

Great Britain’s Mo Farah races and wins final track race in home country

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Great Britain’s 4-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah raced his final race on a U.K. track surface in Birmingham, winning the 3000m, as he crossed the line in 7 minutes 38.64 seconds in the final Diamond League event of the day.

Spain’s Adel Mechaal nipped at Farah’s heels heading into the final 200m, but the Brit’s kick, and the ovation from the home crowd, propelled Farah to victory.

“[The fans] have been amazing. This is what it is all about. This is what we dream of,” Farah said after the race.

At 34, Farah’s plans are to leave the 400m loop behind to pursue road racing in 2018.

“I now have to see what I will do on the road. I don’t think I’ll have the same pressure so I’ll go and enjoy it,” Farah said. “Running was a hobby when I was younger but it has become a job and I love it. It can be hard when you get the pressure but the roads will be something completely different.”

Immediately preceding Farah’s win in Birmingham, Allyson Felix of the U.S. finished second in the women’s 400m final behind Salwa Eid Naser of Bahrain.

“It has been a long few weeks so I was feeling tired out there so I just wanted to come out here and try to get it done but I came up just short,” Felix said. “Everyone is tired from London but I came and gave it my best effort.

“I am not sure about any future races this season, I am going to see how I recover from this.”

Earlier this month, Felix finished behind Naser when she took bronze in the 400m at the 2017 IAAF World Championships, where Phyllis Francis of the U.S. won gold, running a personal best 49.92 seconds. Francis finished fourth in Birmingham behind another U.S. middle distance athlete, Courtney Okolo who got the bronze.

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MORE: U.S., Great Britain to hold track and field dual meet