Sochi Olympics Figure Skating

U.S. in medal position after Day 2 of team figure skating

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Team USA started Day 2 of the inaugural Olympic team figure skating competition facing elimination. But by the end of the day, the Americans had clawed their way back into the medal picture.

Going into tomorrow’s final day (men’s/women’s free skate and free dance), they sit third in the overall standings with 34 points, looking up at leaders Russia (47 points) and Canada (41 points).

Meryl Davis and Charlie White kick-started the American comeback by topping the short program in ice dancing with a score of 75.98, beating out defending Olympic ice dance champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada to earn a full 10 points.

That pushed the U.S. to third in the standings, and that’s where they’d stay for the rest of the afternoon. Ashley Wagner finished fourth in the ladies’ short program with a score of 63.10, while the Russian crowd was brought to their feet by Julia Lipnitskaia, who finished first with a score of 72.90 ahead of Italy’s Carolina Kostner and Japan’s Mao Asada.

MORE: Canada’s Justine Dufour-Lapointe wins women’s moguls gold

With all the short programs completed, Russia, Canada, the U.S., Japan, and Italy all moved on into the free program portion of the competition, which began with the pairs.

Marissa Castelli and Simon Shnapir, who did the pairs’ short program on Thursday, got the call again for the U.S. in free skate and wound up finishing fourth with a score of 117.94 (7 points).

WATCH: Japanese skater Asada falls, but still hopeful

Russia once again showed its strength as Ksenia Stolbova and Fedor Klimov, the final pair to skate this afternoon, took home 10 points for the host nation after posting a score of 135.09. Canada’s Kirsten Moore-Towers and Dylan Moscovitch were second (129.74, 9 points) and Italy’s Stefania Berton and Ondrej Hotarek were third (120.82, 8 points).

TEAM FIGURE SKATING – STANDINGS
(After five events)
1. Russia – 47
2. Canada – 41
3. United States – 34
4. Italy – 31
5. Japan – 30
Eliminated after short programs
6. France – 22
7. China – 20
8. Germany – 17
9. Ukraine – 10
10. Great Britain – 8

Simone Biles welcomed home with cheerleaders, band, police escort (video)

Simone Biles
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The celebration began the moment Simone Biles walked into Bush Airport in Houston on Wednesday.

Biles, after winning four gold medals at the Rio Olympics, arrived in her home state of Texas to the sounds of a band, sights of Houston Texans cheerleaders and much more.

Mayor Sylvester Turner declared Wednesday to be “Simone Biles Day” in Houston, handing the gymnast a paper proclamation.

“Hi guys, I’m Simone Biles, and I can’t thank everyone [enough] in all of Houston for coming out to see me today and to welcome me from Rio,” she said, laughing, on a podium at the airport. “I don’t know what else to say, I’m nervous, and I love you guys.”

Later, Biles was given a parade in her hometown of Spring, a Houston suburb, with a police escort.

Biles and the Final Five’s first stop on the way home from Rio was New York, where they went on a media tour earlier this week. They reached the top of the Empire State Building, visited Jimmy Fallon and saw “Hamilton.”

The Final Five will reunite for a USA Gymnastics tour of 36 cities, beginning Sept. 15.

MORE: Home videos of Simone Biles doing gymnastics

Gwen Jorgensen the latest Olympic triathlon star to move up to marathon

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When Olympic triathlon champion Gwen Jorgensen lines up for her first 26.2-mile race at the New York City Marathon on Nov. 6, it will be hard to judge her performance.

Perhaps the best measure will be her time versus those of previous Olympic triathlon medalists in their marathon debuts.

Jorgensen is recognized as the greatest female runner among top-level female triathletes, perhaps of all time, with an ability to make up deficits of more than one minute on the 10km run after swimming 1,500 meters and biking 40 kilometers.

Swiss Nicola Spirig, the 2012 Olympic triathlon gold medalist, made her marathon debut in 2014 in 2:42:53. Sprig, though, had more long-distance racing experience than Jorgensen, including a half marathon.

Jorgensen, 30 and a former University of Wisconsin distance runner and swimmer, has never tackled more than 10 miles in training, according to The New York Times.

“When you ask athletes what they want to do after they win gold or the Super Bowl, they say they want to go to the happiest place on earth,” Jorgensen said, according to the newspaper. “Running is my happiest place. It’s my Disneyland.”

Portugal’s Vanessa Fernandes shared triathlon’s longest top-level international winning streak before Jorgensen strung together 13 wins in a row.

Fernandes, the 2008 Olympic triathlon silver medalist, clocked 2:31:25 in her first marathon, but it came in 2015, four years after her last elite international triathlon.

The 2015 New York City Marathon women’s winning time was 2:24:25 by Kenyan Mary Keitany. The top American, Laura Thweatt, ran 2:28:23.

This year’s American field may be stronger, with Olympic track distance runners Molly Huddle and Kim Conley making their marathon debuts.

Other Olympic triathlon medalists, including 2004 gold medalist Kate Allen and 2000 silver medalist Michellie Jones, have moved up to the Ironman — a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and a marathon.

In 2014, Jorgensen said she didn’t see herself ever doing an Ironman.

MORE: What Jorgensen asked Ironman star Mirinda Carfrae