Germany’s Carina Vogt wins inaugural women’s ski jumping gold; U.S. shut out

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The first Olympic gold medal for women’s ski jumping has gone to Germany’s Carina Vogt, while Team USA’s trio of competitors and Japan’s all-world jumper, Sara Takanashi, finished out of the medals altogether on the normal hill.

Vogt, who started ski jumping after watching it on television as a young girl, led the event after the first of two final-round jumps.

On her last, she soared 97.5 meters and earned a score of 120.6 for a two-jump score of 247.4 – enough to beat silver medalist Daniela Iraschko-Stolz of Austria by 1.2 points and bronze medalist Coline Mattel of France by 2.2 points.

Hendrickson, the 2013 world champion, was expected to have a say in the outcome despite just coming back recently from a torn right ACL, MCL, and meniscus that she suffered in an August crash.

But she was not a factor in the end, finishing 21st after a final jump of 91.5 meters led to a score of 217.6 that was behind those of fellow Americans Jessica Jerome (10th, 234.1) and Lindsey Van (15th, 227.2).
She did, however, earn the distinction of being the first woman to ever ski jump in the Olympics.

Perhaps the biggest surprise of the night was that Takanashi, who won the World Cup in 2012-13 and had already earned 10 World Cup wins this season going into Sochi, narrowly missed the podium with a fourth-place finish after a score of 243.0.

MORE: Shaun White finishes off the podium in snowboard halfpipe final

WOMEN’S SKI JUMPING – NORMAL HILL FINAL
1. Carina Vogt (GER), 247.4
2. Daniela Iraschko-Stolz (AUT), 246.2
3. Coline Mattel (FRA), 245.2

10. Jessica Jerome (USA), 234.1
15. Lindsey Van (USA), 227.2
21. Sarah Hendrickson (USA), 217.6

Mo Farah on Oregon Project allegations: ‘I’m sick of it’

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EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — As he prepares for what could be his final track race on U.S. soil, Mo Farah remains dogged by doping allegations surrounding his team.

The British Olympian will race the 5000m Saturday at the Prefontaine Classic, the only U.S. stop in the elite Diamond League series (NBC, NBC Sports Gold from 4-6 p.m. ET).

Farah has said that 2017 will be his last year on the track, with an eye on the world championships in London this August. The 34-year-old plans to transition after that to marathons.

Farah defended his 5000m and 10,000m titles at the Rio Olympics last August, becoming the first British track and field athlete to win four Olympic gold medals. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth last December.

But at a news conference for the Prefontaine, Farah faced questions about allegations that paint his team, Nike’s Oregon Project, in a bad light.

Details have emerged from a 2016 report prepared by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on practices by the team, led by decorated U.S. marathoner Alberto Salazar. Allegations have also surfaced recently based on information obtained by the hacking group known as Fancy Bears.

“I just get sick of it, really, to be honest with you,” Farah said. “As an athlete you just want to do the best as you can, and that’s what I want to do. But it’s nothing new. It’s something the press likes to be able to twist it and add a little bit of spices and add stuff on it. Being an Olympic champion, four-time Olympic champion, you do get a lot of that stuff. But at the same time you just have to do the best that you can. I believe in clean sports.”

He said he has not read the USADA report that has shown up online.

“It’s nothing new. You tell me something new. Since 2011 it’s the same stuff,” Farah said, clearly exasperated. “It’s all right. That’s what you get being an Olympic champion, and what we do.”

Farah has been training for the past five months in Flagstaff, Ariz., for the outdoor season and his final bow at the worlds. He hopes to run both of his signature races, the 5000m and 10,000m, if his body lets him, he said.

Saturday’s Prefontaine will be bittersweet.

“I don’t like to think like that, but it will be, my last,” he said. “It will probably be very emotional knowing that will be my last track racing in the U.S. But you know, tomorrow (I) just can’t be worrying about anything. I just have to concentrate on the race and getting the job done.”

Farah will be part of a stellar field that includes Paul Chelimo, the 5000m silver medalist in Rio, and Kenyan Paul Tanui, the Rio silver medalist in the 10,000m.

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VIDEO: Runner clocks No. 2 time ever … after stopping to fix shoe

Gabriele Grunewald races at Pre Classic with 13-inch reminder of cancer

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Delaying chemotherapy, American Gabriele Grunewald finished ninth in the 1500m at the Pre Classic on Friday night.

“I’m a professional runner and four-time cancer survivor,” Grunewald told Lewis Johnson on NBCSN. “I’m still in the fight. I have treatment ahead of me this summer. I’m really just trying to hold onto running because it’s gotten me through so much.”

Grunewald just missed making the 2012 Olympic team, finishing fourth in the 1500m at the Trials, where the top three earned London berths.

That came three years after she was diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare cancer.

Last August, Grunewald had surgery to remove cancer from her liver, which left a 13-inch scar across her stomach visible during Friday’s race.

The cancer resurfaced again in March. She’s putting off chemotherapy until later this summer in a quest to qualify for and race at the U.S. Championships in June.

Grunewald needs to clock 4:09.50 by June 18 for direct entry into the U.S. Championships. Her best time so far this season is 4:12.29, but Grunewald ran 4:01.48 back in 2013.

Her time Friday was 4:15.04.

“Lots of rare cancers out there that don’t have cures. Mine’s of them,” Grunewald said. “So I’m just hoping I can find a treatment that will help me out.”

Full Pre Classic results are here.

Pre Classic coverage continues Saturday on NBC and streaming on NBC Sports Gold from 4-6 p.m. ET.

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VIDEO: Runner clocks No. 2 time ever … after stopping to fix shoe