Skeleton - Winter Olympics Day 6

Noelle Pikus-Pace, Katie Uhlaender in women’s skeleton medal position

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After today’s first two runs of women’s skeleton, the U.S. combo of former world champions Noelle Pikus-Pace (pictured) and Katie Uhlaender are toward the front of the field.

Pikus-Pace is second behind her main World Cup circuit rival, Great Britain’s Lizzy Yarnold, by just .44 of a second, while Uhlaender is fourth at just .14 of a second off of the bronze position that’s currently occupied by Russia’s Elena Nikitina (+.55 seconds).

Going into Sochi, Pikus-Pace’s best Olympic finish was a fourth four years ago at Vancouver; Uhlaender’s was a sixth at Torino in 2006.

“That would be a dream come true if Katie and I could both be up on that podium together, to have two U.S. flags flying and waving in the wind,” Pikus-Pace said in a team release. “That would be absolutely incredible.”

WATCH: Pikus-Pace’s remarkable Olympic journey

The Russians were at the center of a protest of Thursday’s results that was filed by Australian officials. The home team was accused by the Australians of having an unfair advantage by using a push track that wasn’t open to all nations before the race. However, the protest was denied.

Yarnold is looking to defend Great Britain’s skeleton gold from Vancouver four years ago, which was won by her own landlord, Amy Williams. It was the first Winter Olympic individual gold for Great Britain in 30 years.

In Run 1, Yarnold built up a lead of one quarter-second, and then tacked on .19 of a second more in Run 2.

Nikitina – who surely benefits from the knowledge she’s gained about her home track leading up to the Olympics – actually bested Pikus-Pace for second in Run 1 before the American moved back into P2 behind Yarnold.

The women’s skeleton competition concludes tomorrow, with action beginning at 10:20 a.m. ET.

U.S. women’s wrestlers discuss Zika at Olympic test event in Rio (video)

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U.S. Olympic hopefuls are competing in Rio de Janeiro while the Zika virus is being closely monitored, six months ahead of the first Olympics in South America.

In the last week of January, wrestlers competed in an Olympic test event at the Games venue.

“It’s part of traveling,” World champion Adeline Gray said in Rio. “This is something that the people of Brazil have to deal with on a daily basis. The fact that I’m only here for a short time. It’s not really fair for me to freak out about it to that extent. I think if I was planning to have a child in the next month, I would be extremely uneasy about this.”

“I’m just trying not to think about it,” 2013 World bronze medalist Alyssa Lampe said in Rio. “I’m sure if I really thought about the consequences, it would bother me. I’m just trying to focus on wrestling.”

U.S. divers compete in Rio in an Olympic qualifying event next week.

VIDEO: Profile of Kyle Snyder, youngest American to win wrestling World title

Vincent Gagnier, Lisa Zimmermann win ski Big Air at Fenway Park

Vincent Gagnier
AP
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Canadian Vincent Gagnier and German Lisa Zimmermann captured ski Big Air at Fenway Park titles on Friday night.

Gagnier, the 2015 Winter X Games ski big air champion, posted the two best scores of the night, earning the title with a combined 185 points. Scores were tallied combining a skier’s two best runs over three overall.

Gagnier’s highest-scoring trick included four ski grabs while spinning 1260 degrees.

Watch Gagnier’s three runs here. Full men’s results are here.

Zimmermann, the 2015 World champion in ski slopestyle, edged Swede Emma Dahlstrom by two tenths of a point. Zimmermann came up clutch in her final run, scoring a 90.60 on a switch 720-degree jump, going off the ramp backwards.

Watch Zimmermann’s three runs here. Full women’s results are here.

“I love the crowd, it’s like super motivating, and the music is super awesome,” Zimmermann said on NBCSN. “I was thinking all day just to go out and party.”

Athletes were competing on a 140-foot ramp dwarfing the nearby Green Monster, about four times taller than the histroic wall. Ski big air is not part of the Olympic program.

None of the three U.S. Olympic men’s ski slopestyle medalists competed in the final Friday night.

Olympic champion Joss Christensen pulled out before qualification with a sore knee. Silver medalist Gus Kenworthy and bronze medalist Nick Goepper bowed out in qualifying, with Kenworthy not taking all of his runs due to a heel bruise.

U.S. Olympic women’s ski slopestyle silver medalist Devin Logan placed sixth in the final.

NBC will air Big Air at Fenway coverage on Saturday at 5 p.m. ET.

MORE: Shaun White explains ‘shock’ of missing X Games