Sochi Olympics Ice Hockey Men

Sochi Olympic Daily Recap & Medal Count: Day 8

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It took 60 minutes of regulation, five minutes of overtime, and an eight-round shootout, but the U.S. men’s hockey team got the win over Russia in a classic that will be remembered for some time to come.

With international hockey allowing the same shooters to be used multiple times in a shootout, the U.S. chose T.J. Oshie to go six times. He scored four goals in the SO, including the game-winner, to lift the Americans over the Russians, 3-2.

Russia appeared to have taken their own 3-2 lead late in the third period, as a shot from Fedor Tyutin got past U.S. goalie Jonathan Quick. But the net was ruled to have been off of its pegs and the goal was disallowed. In overtime, Patrick Kane’s breakaway attempt was denied by Russia goalie Sergei Bobrovsky to set up the shootout…

VIDEO: Team USA’s highlights from Day 8

Here are recaps of the other men’s hockey contests today:

In women’s hockey quarterfinal action, Sweden beat Finland, 4-2, and Switzerland blanked Russia, 2-0. The Swedes get the U.S. in the semifinals, while the Swiss now prepare for Canada in the same round…

Meanwhile, the U.S. speedskaters continued to struggle. The team gained permission to swap their new racing suits for old ones but still finished out of the medals in the men’s 1500m. Afterwards, star skater Shani Davis wondered if a medal-less Sochi Olympics was the ultimate fate for himself and his comrades…

Their short track brethren didn’t have things any better. None of the three Americans in the men’s 1000m made it out of the quarterfinals, with two of them – J.R. Celski and Eddy Alvarez – crashing out (Russia’s Victor An got the gold). In the women’s 1500m, Emily Scott was able to advance into the final but she was also collected in a crash (she was credited with fifth)…

On the slopes, Team USA’s Julia Mancuso was unable to claim her fifth Olympic medal in the women’s super-G, finishing eighth in the event that was won by Austria’s Anna Fenninger…

Over at Sanki Sliding Center, Matt Antoine became the first American men’s skeleton racer to claim a medal since Jim Shea won in 2002 at Salt Lake City, earning the bronze after teammate John Daly was unable to recover from an ill-fated start. Russia’s Aleksandr Tretiyakov gave the host nation its fourth gold so far in Sochi…

In other medal events, Charlotte Kalla’s blazing final leg gave Sweden the win in the women’s cross country 4x5km relay, while Kamil Stoch became the third man to win both individual ski jumping events in a single Winter Olympics by claiming the large hill title

Out of competition, Russian skicross racer Maria Komissarova suffered a fractured vertebrae in her back in a training crash this morning at Rosa Khutor. Russian officials later reported that she had undergone successful surgery that lasted for six and a half hours…

Today’s Olympic medalists did not receive a piece of the Russian meteorite that exploded over the Chelyabinsk region one year ago…

U.S. skeleton racer Noelle Pikus-Pace received her silver medal after last night’s emotional run at Sanki

The top U.S. women’s bobsled sustained front-end damage in an incident that took place after it had set the fastest training time…

After being unable to attend the Opening Ceremony, Billie Jean King will be part of the American delegation for the Closing Ceremony next weekend…

Thanks to a fellow traveler, snowboard slopestyle gold medalist Sage Kotsenburg was able to go home and see his parents

And one of the Sochi mascots, the Polar Bear, had his own Olympic competition today – trying to fit his head into a minivan

MEDAL COUNT – Feb. 15
(Country – Gold/Silver/Bronze – Total Medals)

1. Germany – 7/3/2 – 12
2. Switzerland – 5/1/1 – 7
3. Russia – 4/6/5 – 15
4. Canada – 4/5/3 – 12
5. Netherlands – 4/4/6 – 14
6. United States – 4/3/7 – 14
7. Norway – 4/3/6 – 13
8. Poland – 4/0/0 – 4
9. China – 3/2/0 – 5
10. Belarus – 3/0/1 – 4
11. Austria – 2/4/1 – 7
12. France – 2/0/2 – 4
13. Sweden – 1/5/2 – 8
14. Japan – 1/3/1 – 5
15. Slovenia – 1/1/3 – 5
16. Korea – 1/1/1 – 3
17. Great Britain – 1/0/1 – 2
18. Slovakia – 1/0/0 – 1
19. Italy – 0/2/3 – 5
20. Czech Republic – 0/2/1 – 3
21. Finland – 0/2/0 – 2
22. Latvia – 0/1/2 – 3
23. Australia – 0/1/1 – 2
24. Croatia – 0/1/0 – 1
T-25. Kazakhstan – 0/0/1 – 1
T-25. Ukraine – 0/0/1 – 1

Katie Ledecky beaten by Simone Manuel, still sets two personal bests in 25 minutes

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 09:  Gold medalist Katie Ledecky of the United States poses on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women's 200m Freestyle Final on Day 4 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)
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The legend of Katie Ledecky grows, even with a defeat.

In one of the greatest short-course-yards doubles in history, Ledecky broke the American record in the 400-yard individual medley and then lowered her personal best in the 200-yard free by a half-second in a 25-minute span at the Pac-12 Championships on Friday.

Ledecky won the Pac-12 title in the 400-yard IM by chopping three seconds off her personal best, clocking 3:57.68 in Federal Way, Wash.

About 25 minutes later, the Stanford freshman nearly came back to beat co-Olympic 100m free champion Simone Manuel in the 200-yard free final. Manuel had to cut .58 off her 200-yard free personal best to edge Ledecky by .13. Full results are here.

Manuel led by .99 after the first 50 yards, but Ledecky closed 1.2 seconds faster than Manuel in the final 50 yards. It marked Ledecky’s second defeat in a freestyle final longer than 100 meters since Jan. 18, 2014. Manuel also beat Ledecky in a 200-yard free in November.

Still, Ledecky chopped .54 off her 200-yard free personal best, touching the wall in 1:40.50.

Their anticipated rematch in the NCAA Championships in three weeks should be the event of that meet.

But the 400 IM may be more intriguing come the summer. Ledecky’s last 100 yards of freestyle in Friday’s final were 4.06 seconds faster than runner-up Ella Eastin.

The NCAA 400 IM is in a 25-yard pool. Internationally, the 400 IM is in a 50-meter pool.

Ledecky has never raced the 400m IM at a major international meet and scratched out of the event on the eve of the Olympic Trials eight months ago. She ranked fifth in the U.S. in the event in 2016 but never raced it fully tapered.

Her time on Friday was faster than the 400-yard IM personal best of Maya DiRado, who took Olympic 400m IM silver in Rio and then retired.

Ledecky could conceivably try and race the 400m IM this summer. At nationals in June, the 400m IM final is on a night where Ledecky would have no other finals. At worlds in July, the 400m IM comes on the final day of the meet (as opposed to the first day at the Olympics), also on a night where Ledecky would have no other individual events.

Earlier at Pac-12s, Ledecky lowered her American record in the 500-yard free by 1.31 seconds on Thursday, swimming faster than Ryan Lochte‘s personal best at the same age.

The Pac-12 Championships conclude Saturday.

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Michael Phelps ‘would probably do’ another Olympics if not for injury risk

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Michael Phelps said he would probably swim another Olympic cycle if it wasn’t for the possibility of injury, particularly with his shoulders.

“If you could guarantee me that I would never get injured in four years, and I would never have any problems with my shoulders or anything like that in four years, I’d probably do it again because I had more fun this time around,” Phelps said in a social media video Friday. “But I don’t want to risk that and not be able to spend time with Booms [son Boomer] when he grows up and watch him and be a part of every single part of his life when he gets older and older. So I think that’s something, for me, that I will never put my body through. I won’t take that chance. I think my body is way more important and my family is way more important than going another four years to swim in one more Olympics.”

Phelps’ right shoulder was a particular issue in his comeback for the Rio Olympics. He received two cortisone shots in the months before the Games, leading coach Bob Bowman to say that Phelps was “75 percent” of what he was at the 2008 Beijing Games, according to Sports Illustrated.

(Phelps has said he didn’t compete at 100 percent in Beijing, given an October 2007 broken wrist that interrupted training.)

Phelps reiterated, repeatedly as usual, during the 70-minute video that he would not return to competitive swimming. He still swims recreationally “for peace of mind” and “meditation.”

What about retirement saddens him?

“Not having the chance to represent my country anymore is something bums me out,” Phelps said, particularly hearing the national anthem atop the medal stand.

Phelps has plenty to keep him busy. The most pressing is testifying at a congressional hearing looking at improving the flawed anti-doping system in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

“I have a lot to say,” Phelps said. “To have that opportunity to speak out about my true feelings. I’ve never really, truly been able to do it.”

He began outlining those words Friday and said he had until Sunday to finish a page or a page and a half to present to the subcommittee.

“There are too many people who are cheating, that’s the easiest way to say it,” Phelps said. “Look what happened at the [Rio] Olympics, all the athletes that tested positive that were still allowed to compete. I think that’s wrong, and I think it’s unfair. I think that’s something that needs to clean.”

In Rio, Phelps praised teammate Lilly King‘s criticisms of athletes competing who had previously served doping punishments (such as King’s breaststroke rival, Russian Yuliya Yefimova). Phelps doubts he has ever competed in a clean race.

“I think you’re going to probably see a lot of people speaking out more,” Phelps said in Rio, according to The Associated Press. “I think [King] is right, I think something needs to be done. It’s kind of sad today in sports in general, not just in swimming, there are people who are testing positive who are allowed back in the sport and multiple times. It kind of breaks what sport is meant to be and that’s what pisses me off.”

Phelps said Friday that he hopes to help “clean the sports up so we can get back to why we play sports.”

“I don’t think any athlete should ever have that feeling that somebody else is at an advantage of using a performance-enhancing drug to help them,” he said. “I had these massive dreams and goals of things I wanted to accomplish and achieve, and never were they because I thought I could take an easy way by cheating. I basically just worked as hard as I could and made sure that my body was as prepared as I could possibly make it for every single meet. So I was able to accomplish the goals and dreams that I had. That’s something that I’m going to Congress to talk about.”

Phelps also added in Friday’s video that he hopes another swimmer will come along and break his records, that he was recently knocked out of a poker tournament by his wife and he will be in Budapest for the world championships in July.

Just not as a competitor.

MORE: Ledecky’s latest American record faster than Ryan Lochte at same age