Sochi Olympic Daily Recap & Medal Count: Day 8

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It took 60 minutes of regulation, five minutes of overtime, and an eight-round shootout, but the U.S. men’s hockey team got the win over Russia in a classic that will be remembered for some time to come.

With international hockey allowing the same shooters to be used multiple times in a shootout, the U.S. chose T.J. Oshie to go six times. He scored four goals in the SO, including the game-winner, to lift the Americans over the Russians, 3-2.

Russia appeared to have taken their own 3-2 lead late in the third period, as a shot from Fedor Tyutin got past U.S. goalie Jonathan Quick. But the net was ruled to have been off of its pegs and the goal was disallowed. In overtime, Patrick Kane’s breakaway attempt was denied by Russia goalie Sergei Bobrovsky to set up the shootout…

VIDEO: Team USA’s highlights from Day 8

Here are recaps of the other men’s hockey contests today:

In women’s hockey quarterfinal action, Sweden beat Finland, 4-2, and Switzerland blanked Russia, 2-0. The Swedes get the U.S. in the semifinals, while the Swiss now prepare for Canada in the same round…

Meanwhile, the U.S. speedskaters continued to struggle. The team gained permission to swap their new racing suits for old ones but still finished out of the medals in the men’s 1500m. Afterwards, star skater Shani Davis wondered if a medal-less Sochi Olympics was the ultimate fate for himself and his comrades…

Their short track brethren didn’t have things any better. None of the three Americans in the men’s 1000m made it out of the quarterfinals, with two of them – J.R. Celski and Eddy Alvarez – crashing out (Russia’s Victor An got the gold). In the women’s 1500m, Emily Scott was able to advance into the final but she was also collected in a crash (she was credited with fifth)…

On the slopes, Team USA’s Julia Mancuso was unable to claim her fifth Olympic medal in the women’s super-G, finishing eighth in the event that was won by Austria’s Anna Fenninger…

Over at Sanki Sliding Center, Matt Antoine became the first American men’s skeleton racer to claim a medal since Jim Shea won in 2002 at Salt Lake City, earning the bronze after teammate John Daly was unable to recover from an ill-fated start. Russia’s Aleksandr Tretiyakov gave the host nation its fourth gold so far in Sochi…

In other medal events, Charlotte Kalla’s blazing final leg gave Sweden the win in the women’s cross country 4x5km relay, while Kamil Stoch became the third man to win both individual ski jumping events in a single Winter Olympics by claiming the large hill title

Out of competition, Russian skicross racer Maria Komissarova suffered a fractured vertebrae in her back in a training crash this morning at Rosa Khutor. Russian officials later reported that she had undergone successful surgery that lasted for six and a half hours…

Today’s Olympic medalists did not receive a piece of the Russian meteorite that exploded over the Chelyabinsk region one year ago…

U.S. skeleton racer Noelle Pikus-Pace received her silver medal after last night’s emotional run at Sanki

The top U.S. women’s bobsled sustained front-end damage in an incident that took place after it had set the fastest training time…

After being unable to attend the Opening Ceremony, Billie Jean King will be part of the American delegation for the Closing Ceremony next weekend…

Thanks to a fellow traveler, snowboard slopestyle gold medalist Sage Kotsenburg was able to go home and see his parents

And one of the Sochi mascots, the Polar Bear, had his own Olympic competition today – trying to fit his head into a minivan

MEDAL COUNT – Feb. 15
(Country – Gold/Silver/Bronze – Total Medals)

1. Germany – 7/3/2 – 12
2. Switzerland – 5/1/1 – 7
3. Russia – 4/6/5 – 15
4. Canada – 4/5/3 – 12
5. Netherlands – 4/4/6 – 14
6. United States – 4/3/7 – 14
7. Norway – 4/3/6 – 13
8. Poland – 4/0/0 – 4
9. China – 3/2/0 – 5
10. Belarus – 3/0/1 – 4
11. Austria – 2/4/1 – 7
12. France – 2/0/2 – 4
13. Sweden – 1/5/2 – 8
14. Japan – 1/3/1 – 5
15. Slovenia – 1/1/3 – 5
16. Korea – 1/1/1 – 3
17. Great Britain – 1/0/1 – 2
18. Slovakia – 1/0/0 – 1
19. Italy – 0/2/3 – 5
20. Czech Republic – 0/2/1 – 3
21. Finland – 0/2/0 – 2
22. Latvia – 0/1/2 – 3
23. Australia – 0/1/1 – 2
24. Croatia – 0/1/0 – 1
T-25. Kazakhstan – 0/0/1 – 1
T-25. Ukraine – 0/0/1 – 1

Caeleb Dressel, Chase Kalisz open post-Phelps era with world titles

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In a 20-minute span, the future of U.S. men’s swimming may have arrived in Budapest on Thursday.

Chase Kalisz, 23, and Caeleb Dressel, 20, each bagged his first major individual gold medal at the world championships. They headlined a three-gold day for Team USA, which was anchored by Katie Ledecky bouncing back from her first major defeat to lead the 4x200m free relay to gold.

Kalisz ensured the 200m individual medley crown stayed with the U.S., fulfilling years of promise and succeeding longtime training partner Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte in the event.

Dressel, the youngest U.S. man to win an individual Olympic or world title since 2005, broke his American record in the 100m freestyle to prevail by a distant seven tenths of a second in 47.17. Nathan Adrian, the 2012 Olympic champion, made it the first one-two U.S. men’s finish in a global 100m free since the Seoul 1988 Games.

Kalisz won the 200m IM in 1:55.56, by .45 over Japan’s Kosuke Hagino and .72 over China’s Wang Shun, who took silver and bronze in Rio behind Phelps. Kalisz overtook Hagino on the third leg, breaststroke, with the fastest split in the field, and held on in the last 50 meters of freestyle.

Phelps and Lochte had combined to win every Olympic and world title in the 200m IM from 2003 through 2016. That’s four Olympics — all won by Phelps — and seven worlds — the first three titles taken by Phelps, the last four by Lochte.

“Those two are my idols,” Kalisz said. “No one’s ever going to replace those guys. Those guys are going to be what, hopefully, my kids are probably going to be talking about those two”

Phelps retired after the Rio Olympics. Lochte isn’t in Budapest due to his suspension following his Rio gas-station incident, but plans to make a run for Tokyo 2020 at age 35.

For now, U.S. men’s swimming is led by Kalisz, Dressel and Ryan Murphy, the 22-year-old who swept the backstrokes in Rio.

Kalisz and Dressel are only the third and fourth U.S. men other than Phelps or Lochte to win individual world titles since 2009 (Aaron PeirsolMatt Grevers).

“We’re still in a rebuilding phase,” said Kalisz, previously a world team member in 2013, 2015. “This has been probably the best world championships I’ve been to as far as the team being close.”

Kalisz, who took 400m IM silver at his first Olympics in Rio, may just be getting started.

He can go for double IM gold in the 400m, his trademark event, in Budapest on Sunday.

“When I had the opportunity to step into the 200m IM, it was an honor,” Kalisz said on NBCSN. “I like [the 200m IM] a lot more than the 400m IM. It doesn’t hurt as bad. If you were to tell me four months ago that would be my first world title [in the 200m IM rather than the 400m IM], I probably would have laughed in your face.”

Dressel nearly quit swimming three years ago as the No. 1 recruit in the nation. Then, under perhaps more pressure than any swimmer in Rio, swam a personal-best time in his very first Olympic splash leading off the 4x100m free relay team to gold.

Dressel has only improved after his junior year at the University of Florida. He qualified to swim in up to nine events in Budapest and is now up to three golds with a few more events left. He led off the 4x100m free relay on Sunday with an American record in the 100m free, then went even lower in Thursday’s final.

“Before the race, I was like, hey man, this is going to be the first of many, many finals that you’re going to be in,” said Adrian, who took bronze in Rio, where Dressel was sixth. “He’s going to be incredible in the years to come.”

In other events Thursday, Spain’s Mireia Belmonte followed her Olympic 200m butterfly gold with her first world title. She won by .13 over German Franziska Hentke, with Hungarian superstar Katinka Hosszu earning bronze.

Americans Simone Manuel and Mallory Comerford qualified second- and third-fastest into Friday’s 100m freestyle final. Swede Sarah Sjöström, who shattered the world record leading off the 4x100m free relay Sunday, leads the eight-woman final.

Lilly King and Yulia Efimova set up another breaststroke showdown, this time in the 200m distance. Efimova will be heavily favored, while King was the last qualifier into Friday’s final in a tougher distance for the 100m gold medalist and world-record holder.

Murphy was the No. 2 qualifier into Friday’s 200m back final, behind China’s Xu Jiayu, who beat Murphy in the 100m back earlier this week.

Americans Kevin Cordes and Nic Fink qualified for Friday’s 200m breast final, but the favorites are Olympic bronze medalist Anton Chupkov of Russia and world-record holder Ippei Watanabe of Japan.

Etiene Medeiros became the first Brazilian woman to win an Olympic or world swim title in the pool in the 50m backstroke. She prevailed by .01 over China’s Fu Yuanhui in the non-Olympic event.

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WORLDS: TV Schedule | Men’s Preview | Women’s Preview | Schedule/Results

Men’s 100m Freestyle Results
Gold: Caeleb Dressel (USA) — 47.17
Silver: Nathan Adrian (USA) — 47.87
Bronze: Mehdy Metella (FRA) — 47.89
4. Cameron McEvoy (AUS) — 47.91
5. Duncan Scott (GBR) — 48.11
5. Marcelo Chierighini (BRA) — 48.11
7. Jack Cartwright (AUS) — 48.24
8. Sergii Shevtsov (UKR) — 48.26

Men’s 200m Individual Medley Results
Gold: Chase Kalisz (USA) — 1:55.56
Silver: Kosuke Hagino (JPN) — 1:56.01
Bronze: Wang Shun (CHN) — 1:56.28
4. Max Litchfield (GBR) — 1:56.86
5. Daiya Seto (JPN) — 1:56.97
6. Qin Haiyang (CHN) — 1:57.06
7. Philip Heintz (GER) — 1:57.43
8. Jeremy Desplanches (SUI) — 1:57.50

Katie Ledecky bounces back, anchors U.S. relay to gold (video)

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Katie Ledecky rebounded from her first major defeat with a more typical result Thursday, gold while anchoring the U.S. 4x200m freestyle relay.

Leah SmithMallory ComerfordMelanie Margalis and Ledecky combined to win the world title in Budapest by 1.57 seconds over China. Australia earned bronze.

Ledecky dove in with a .13 lead over China and fell behind by .13 after 50 meters but opened up a body-length lead going into the last 50 meters.

Ledecky bagged her 13th career world gold (extending her female record) and fourth of this week. Her bid to match Missy Franklin‘s female record of six golds at a single worlds ended with a shocking silver in the individual 200m freestyle on Wednesday.

“I really just got rid of the negative energy,” Ledecky said on NBCSN. “I knew I had a big race for Team USA tonight. That made it easy to get focused.”

Ledecky had the fastest split time of the 32 swimmers by 1.44 seconds. She outsplit Australian Emma McKeon by 2.24 seconds after McKeon tied Ledecky for silver in the 200m free. Ledecky was .28 slower than her split in Rio, which is strong. In her other events this week, Ledecky was between one and two seconds slower than in Rio.

“I wanted to put up a better swim than last night, I don’t know if it was from frustration or just swimming for my team,” Ledecky told media in Budapest. “Knowing that I had this swim today, there’s no better event or swim to come off of last night than this one. It just felt really good warming up. It just felt a lot better than yesterday and just knew that I could lay it all out there.”

Ledecky has one event left at worlds, the 800m freestyle, with preliminary heats Friday and the final Saturday. The 800m free is Ledecky’s signature event, in which she owns the 13 fastest times in history.

Ledecky won her first Olympic title in the 800m free as a 15-year-old in London and went on to world titles in 2013 and 2015 and repeat gold in Rio last year.

Women’s 4x200m Freestyle Relay Results
Gold: U.S. — 7:43.39

Silver: China — 7:44.96
Bronze: Australia — 7:48.51
4. Russia — 7:48.59
5. Japan — 7:50.43
6. Hungary — 7:51.33
7. Netherlands — 7:54.29
8. Canada — 7:55.57

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WORLDS: TV Schedule | Men’s Preview | Women’s Preview | Schedule/Results