Sochi Olympics Alpine Skiing Men

Bode Miller ties for bronze to break U.S. record; Andrew Weibrecht surprises for silver

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Bode Miller, 36, showed flashes of former brilliance in Sochi and finally put it all together in the super-G. He put together a vintage performance to tie Canada’s Jan Hudec for bronze on Sunday, making some history in the process.

Even so, he wasn’t the highest finishing U.S. skier, as Andrew Weibrecht shocked for a silver medal.

MORE: Miller’s “emotional” day

This represents Miller’s sixth career Olympic medal, the most of any U.S. Alpine skier. Only Norway’s Kjetil Andre Aamodt has won more medals in Alpine skiing overall. The significance was not lost on him, as he wept on the course following his strong run:

It wasn’t shocking that Norway took gold, but some may be surprised that Kjetil Jansrud was the man who took it, although he’s had a fantastic run in the 2014 Olympics. He’ll add this gold to a bronze from men’s downhill.

Again, to say that Weibrecht’s run was unexpected is putting things lightly. Then again, NBC’s Nick Zaccardi indicates that he’s developing a reputation for big outputs in big moments:

Blind Paralympic champion Brad Snyder throws ceremonial first pitch (video)

Brad Snyder
Courtesy of the Baltimore Orioles
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Brad Snyder, who took home three swimming gold medals from the Rio Paralympic Games, threw the ceremonial first pitch at the Baltimore Orioles game on Sunday.

Snyder, who lost his vision while serving in the U.S. Navy in Afghanistan by stepping on an improvised explosive device, is a native of Baltimore.

He pitched alongside fellow Paralympic swimmer McKenzie Coan, who also claimed three gold medals in Rio.

The Orioles honored two more Paralympians, track and field sisters Hannah and Tatyana McFadden, before Saturday’s game.

Tatyana won six medals in Rio, which tied her with swimmer Jessica Long for the most for a U.S. athlete.

MORE: Katie Ledecky helps Bryce Harper celebrate NL East title (video)

High school gym named after Olympic champion Jordan Burroughs

US' Jordan Ernest Burroughs celebrates a
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The gymnasium at Winslow Township (N.J.) High School was renamed Jordan Burroughs Gymnasium on Saturday in honor of the 2012 Olympic wrestling champion.

“I just want people to recognize it’s possible,” Burroughs said to the Courier-Post. “It takes focus, dedication and really, discipline, to get to this high level of success. But like, I did it. From here. These same teachers, these same facilities, this same community. It’s possible. I want people to recognize that.”

Burroughs was a state champion in 2006 at Winslow Township High School. Six years later, he claimed an Olympic gold medal in the men’s freestyle wrestling 74kg division.

In Rio, he lost his quarterfinal match to Russia’s Aniuar Geduev, who went on to earn the silver medal. After the match, an emotional Burroughs referred to the loss as the “hardest day of my life.”

MORE: Jordan Burroughs will not repeat gold after loss to Russia’s Geduev