Expat Vic Wild, wife delighted by rare medal double

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KRASNAYA, POLYANA, Russia — Stunned to learn this was only the second time in Winter Olympic history that a husband and wife had earned a medal in the same event, the first reaction: “Is that true?”

Disbelief came over the face of Alena Zavarzina of Russia and she was instantly at a loss of words standing next to her husband, double-taking at the scene around her to ensure it was in fact reality.

Vic Wild, an American-born snowboarder hailing from the state of Washington but now competing alongside Zavarzina for a different red, white and blue, had a more comical response upon learning the entirety of the historical news: “It was figure skating? That’s cheating,” he laughed.

RELATED: Husband/wife duo win medals in parallel giant slalom

Wild and Zavarzina do everything together.

“We do too much together,” joked Wild.

They train, travel and compete together and it is clear that they have more than just chemistry; they have a little bit of magic.

Neither athlete was necessarily expected to podium in Wednesday’s snowboarding parallel giant slalom (PGS) event. Zavarzina placed 17th back at the Vancouver Olympics and Wild had a record that was less than favorable coming into the Sochi Games.

Wild did however post a top-five finish at a World Cup PGS event in January, boosting his resume a bit leading into the Games. Meanwhile, Zavarzina broke her arm at an event that same month and required surgery. In her first event back, she placed only 22nd.

Never again will the duo fly under the radar.

VIDEO: How did Wild and Zavarvina pull it off?

Zavarzina, still competing with a brace on her left arm, rode with a confidence and familiarity with her board that she has acquired throughout her entire life. As a child, she began to snowboard because her mother’s friend had set up a snowboard school, and despite wanting to ski, she made the decision to become the town’s “little snowboard girl” and began to hone her skills. On Wednesday that little snowboard girl won a bronze medal.

Wild literally stunned all with his riding in the event. Round after round he proved he was the one to beat, only falling behind in a single run, the first of his final, where he managed to overcome a half-second deficit to earn the first medal for Russia in PGS — and a gold at that.

Oddly enough, that gold could have just as easily been the first for Wild’s native-born country of the United States had he found more support a few years back.

RELATED: Snowboarder Vic Wild leaves U.S. to compete as Russian

For three years Wild rode for the U.S. team, but was forced to cut ties with the team because in his words, “their focus was in other areas.”

When it began to look like his professional snowboarding stint was coming to a close, Zavarzina offered another option.

“I didn’t want him to quit. I wanted him to keep chasing his dream,” said the emotional Zavarzina, still taking in the moment.

The two were married, allowing Wild the opportunity to train and ride for the Russian snowboard team. He even felt at home, mentioning that because he looks Russian, people think he is – until he speaks.

Wild harvested no hard feelings whatsoever towards his native country, saying the problem he ran into, lack of funding and support, “had nothing to do with the United States, it had something to do with a nonprofit organization.”

“We’ve all got to get what we need,” said the relaxed Wild.

As the Games drew near, Wild received an outpouring of support from his friends back home across Washington.

“It made me feel so comfortable knowing all my friends actually cared, I didn’t know they cared. It kind of makes you realize you had already done something special by being here. I had already won today before I had even started. That probably gave me the ability to relax and ride well.”

In the end it wasn’t a medal won for his home country, but it was indeed won in part by the support of it.

Ex-Canadian Olympic Committee president sorry for behavior, quits law firm

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MONTREAL (AP) — Former Canadian Olympic Committee President Marcel Aubut has apologized for his behavior amid allegations he sexually harassed several women.

He said in a statement Friday he has been “living in turmoil,” offering “unreserved apologies” from the “bottom of my heart” to all who have been hurt by his conduct. The 67-year-old Aubut adds he is leaving his BCF law firm and seeking counseling.

Aubut resigned as Canadian Olympic Committee president last weekend after women accused him of sexual comments and unwanted touching. Interim president Tricia Smith has said the organization’s board was not aware of “any specific interactions that would be construed as harassment.”

Aubut was CEO of the NHL’s Quebec Nordiques until the team moved to Colorado in 1995. He was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.

MORE: Canada sets Rio 2016 medals goal

Magnificent Seven reunion in the works

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Magnificent Seven teammates had a message for team captain Amanda Borden after they won gold at the Atlanta 1996 Olympics.

“You have to get us back together,” Borden remembered in a phone interview Friday.

Reunions have been rare in the last 15 years, but Borden said she’s been in contact with all of her teammates to arrange at least one get-together in 2016 to mark the 20-year anniversary of their Olympic triumph.

“It’s easier said than done,” said Borden, who owns two Phoenix-area gyms with her husband and has three children. “I know every one of us really wants to make it happen. We are definitely doing it. It’s just a matter of if all of us can be there.”

It may happen in Atlanta. It may be at a USA Gymnastics event, such as the Olympic trials in San Jose, Calif., in July. It may be somewhere less visible, such as a warm beach.

It probably won’t happen in Rio de Janeiro, because it’s hard to coordinate the schedules of all seven women for an event abroad, even though some will be at the Olympics anyway.

Borden and Kerri Strug said they don’t remember all seven members of the team being together since 2008, the year the Magnificent Seven shared a stage for a U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame induction (photo here).

“[Borden] has put out the feelers; it seems like we’re on board,” Strug said while in New York last month for an Epson “Swimming in Ink” event with U.S. synchronized swimmers. “Do we want to do a cruise or take a vacation?”

The other Magnificent Seven team members were Amy Chow, Dominique Dawes, Shannon MillerDominique Moceanu and Jaycie Phelps.

MORE GYMNASTICS: Shannon Miller recalls 1996 Olympic podium thoughts in book excerpt