Sochi Olympics Ice Hockey Women

Canada rallies, stuns U.S. in OT to win women’s hockey gold

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In women’s hockey, there is no bigger prize than Olympic gold medals.

On Thursday, the U.S. was fewer than five minutes from achieving the ultimate prize, before Canada stormed back with two late goals to send the contest to sudden death overtime, where Marie-Philip Poulin scored the goal that brought gold medals to Canada.

VIDEO: Watch the shot that hit the post

For Canada, it’s their fourth consecutive gold medals in women’s Olympic hockey.

For the U.S., it is their second straight silver medals.

VIDEO: How did the game get to OT?

The Canadians pulled within 2-1 when Brianne Jenner scored with less than four minutes to go in regulation. A short time later, they opted to pull goalie Shannon Szabados from the net – only to have an American shot fired from deep within their zone toward the open goal.

The puck hit the left post. Canada was still alive.

And with 55 seconds remaining in regulation, they pulled even as Poulin – who scored both goals in the Canadians’ 2-0 gold medal win over the U.S. four years ago in Vancouver – lit the lamp.

VIDEO: U.S. receives its silver medals

The game then went to overtime, which featured a series of penalties that left the Canadians with an eventual 5-on-3 advantage. At the 8:10 mark, Poulin struck again and zipped a quick shot into the net.

The heroine of Vancouver became the heroine of Sochi.

MORE: Watch the FULL REPLAY of today’s U.S.-Canada women’s hockey gold medal game

source: AP
Team USA’s Anna Schleper (15) skates off the ice after Canada’s gold-medal winning goal in OT. Photo: AP.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY – GOLD MEDAL GAME
CANADA 3, UNITED STATES 2 (OT)

Scoring Summary
Second Period
USA – Meghan Duggan (Jocelyne Lamoureux), 11:57 – USA 1-0

Third Period
USA – Alex Carpenter (Hilary Knight, Kelli Stack), 2:01 – USA 2-0
CAN – Brianne Jenner (Meaghan Mikkelson, Jocelyne Larocque), 16:34 – USA 2-1
CAN – Marie-Philip Poulin (Rebecca Johnston, Haley Irwin), 19:05 – TIE 2-2

Overtime
CAN – Poulin (Laura Fortino), 8:10 – CAN 3-2

Goaltenders
CAN – Shannon Szabados, 27 saves on 29 shots
USA – Jessie Vetter, 28 saves on 31 shots

Usain Bolt would have considered 2020 Olympics if he lost medal before Rio

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If Usain Bolt had lost his 2008 Olympic relay medal before the Rio Games, instead of last month, maybe he would have considered trying for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

“Maybe if it had come before the Olympics, maybe it would have taken away a little from me, and then I would have thought about [2020],” Bolt said in a CNN interview published Monday of dropping from nine Olympic golds to eight due to teammate Nesta Carter‘s doping, “but the fact that I got the chance to say, ‘the triple-triple,’ kind of made me feel good.”

In Rio, Bolt completed his “triple-triple” at his final Olympics, sweeping the 100m, 200m and 4x100m titles at a third straight Games. Bolt raced with the knowledge that Carter had failed retests of 2008 Olympic samples but had yet to receive any punishment.

Five months later, the triple-triple was no more.

On Jan. 25, the IOC announced teammate Nesta Carter was retroactively disqualified from the Beijing Games. Carter was on Jamaica’s 4x100m relay team in Beijing, so the entire team was stripped of medals, including Bolt.

Carter is appealing his punishment.

Carter also joined Bolt on gold-medal-winning 4x100m relays at the 2012 Olympics and the world championships in 2011, 2013 and 2015. Carter was not disqualified from those meets like he was the 2008 Beijing Games.

Bolt said he had no fear or worry about the possibility of having to return more relay gold medals.

“Even if I lose all my relay gold medals, for me, I did what I had to do, my personal goals,” Bolt said in the CNN interview that appeared to take place two weeks ago in Monaco. “That’s what counts.”

Bolt also said he had not spoken to Carter since the ruling was handed down.

“My friends have asked me what I’m going to say [to Carter], but I don’t know,” Bolt said, repeating that he had no hard feelings toward Carter.

Bolt’s next scheduled meet is the Racers Grand Prix in Kingston on June 10, but he could (and likely will given his past) sign up for another race between now and then.

MORE: Bolt meets Michael Phelps, predicts when 100m world record will fall

Lindsey Vonn among Olympic medalists in documentary about gender in sports

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Olympic medalists Lindsey VonnHilary Knight and Ann Meyers-Drysdale will feature in TOMBOY, an hourlong, multi-platform documentary project aiming to elevate the conversation about gender in sports.

TOMBOY, which will premiere in March, is told through the voices of many of the world’s most prominent female athletes, broadcasters and sports executives.

It will air across all NBC Sports Regional Networks, NBCSN and select NBC-owned TV stations (check local listings). Clips can be found here. More information can be found here.

In an interview clip, Vonn discusses a challenge unique to her sport — fear.

“In my sport, you can’t be afraid,” said the 2010 Olympic downhill champion, who continues to come back from high-speed crashes and major injuries. “Ski racing is an incredibly dangerous sport. It definitely would not be safe if you were afraid of going 90 miles per hour.”

Knight, a two-time Olympic silver medalist, said that at age 5 one of her grandmothers told her that girls don’t play hockey.

“Since age 5, I’ve been working toward an Olympic dream,” said Knight, the MVP of the last two world championships. “Fifteen years later, I ended up at my first Olympic Games.”

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VIDEO: Vonn crashes out of World Cup super-G