Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

U.S., Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce star to end World Indoor Championships

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The U.S. won 12 medals and eight golds to lead all nations in both categories at the finish of the World Indoor Track and Field Championships in Sopot, Poland, on Sunday.

The U.S. led the medal counts for the fourth straight World Indoors, boosted Sunday by the first global championship medals — golds — from Chanelle Price (800m) and Omo Osaghae (60m hurdles) and the men’s and women’s 4x400m relay teams.

The U.S. men’s 4x400m closed the meet with its only world indoor record — 3 minutes, 2.13 seconds.

The marquee event on the third and final day was the women’s 60m. Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won in 6.98 seconds, the second fastest time this millennium.

Fraser-Pryce, the two-time reigning Olympic 100m champion and world champion in the 100m and 200m, joined countrywoman Veronica Campbell-Brown as the only women to win world titles in the 60m, 100m and 200m.

The Ivory Coast’s Murielle Ahoure took silver in 7.01, followed by American Tianna Bartoletta (formerly Madison) in 7.06.

The seven-time Olympic medalist Campbell-Brown finished fifth in her first meet since it was revealed she failed a drug test in May.

In the 800m, Price shocked the field by winning in 2:00.09, the fastest time in the world this year. Price was the world’s 28th fastest woman in the 800m last year.

Osaghae took the 60m hurdles in a world-leading 7.45, prevailing by .01 and .02 over the French silver and bronze medalists. The U.S. has won every global 60m/110m hurdles championship since 2010, shared among four men.

American Bernard Lagat won silver in the 3000m. Lagat, at 39 years, 87 days old, became the oldest men’s medalist in World Indoor Championships history. Teammate Galen Rupp was fourth.

U.S. Olympic champion Jenn Suhr tied for fifth in the pole vault, won by Cuba’s Yarisley Silva. Silva was second to Suhr at the London Games.

Ethiopia’s Genzebe Dibaba blew away the 3000m field, prevailing by 2.68 seconds but was more than 38 seconds slower than her world record set Feb. 6.

Track and field now enters the outdoor season. Key events include Diamond League meets beginning May 9, the U.S. Championships in Sacramento, Calif., from June 26-29 and the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland, beginning in late July.

Big road races come first, though. The New York City Half Marathon is next Sunday and includes Mo Farah. Farah is prepping for his marathon debut in London on April 13. The Boston Marathon is April 21.

U.S. Paralympian in good spirits after scary crash

Ryan Lochte: Katie Ledecky beats me in practice

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We already knew Katie Ledecky can beat the boys in practice, even an Olympic champion.

One of the many takeaways from this week’s Sports Illustrated profile of Ledecky is that she has beaten 11-time Olympic medalist Ryan Lochte in practice.

Ledecky and Lochte may rep different swim clubs — Ledecky in Washington, D.C., and Lochte in Charlotte — but they both take trips to the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo., for altitude training.

“She swims like a guy,” Lochte said after training with Ledecky in Colorado Springs in March, according to SI. “I’ve never seen a female swimmer like that. … Her times are becoming good for a guy. She’s beating me now, and I’m like, What’s going on?

When Ledecky broke the women’s 1500m freestyle world record for the third time at the August 2014 Pan Pacific Championships, her time of 15:28.36 was .01 faster than Lochte’s 1500m free time at the 2004 U.S. Olympic Trials (one of the rare instances Lochte swam a 1500m free).

Ledecky has since re-broken the women’s 1500m free world record twice more, bringing it down to 15:25.48.

“I trained with her in Colorado once, and she made me look like I was stopping,” Lochte reportedly told media on his 31st birthday, Aug. 3 at the World Championships in Kazan, Russia. “She flew by me.”

MORE: Shirley Babashoff bows to Katie Ledecky

Jennie Finch to manage baseball team for one day

Jennie Finch
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Athens Olympic softball champion Jennie Finch will manage the Bridgeport Bluefish, an independent minor-league baseball team on Sunday and, reportedly, become the first woman to manage a men’s pro baseball team.

Finch, a pitcher, retired from softball in 2010, two years after her sport’s Olympic farewell in Beijing, where she and the U.S. took silver behind Japan.

Finch has been an advocate for softball’s return to the Olympics, which could happen in Tokyo 2020.

The International Olympic Committee is expected to decide in August if baseball and softball, among four other sports, will be added for the Tokyo Games.

Finch, who is married to former MLB pitcher Casey Daigle, is also known for having struck out Albert Pujols.

MORE: Jennie Finch, Lisa Fernandez weigh in on Mo’ne Davis

Looking fwd to guest managing the Bridgeport Bluefish this Sunday! ⚾️ #Baseball #BridgeportBluefish

A photo posted by Jennie Finch (@jfinch27) on