Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon announces increased security

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Boston Marathon organizers detailed what they called a comprehensive security plan Monday for the April 21 race, following last year’s bombings that killed three people and injured more than 260.

Some 36,000 runners — 9,000 more than last year — and perhaps more than one million spectators are expected for the 26.2-mile race on Patriots’ Day.

They will face measures such as 3,500 police officers — uniformed and in plain clothes and more than double last year’s amount, according to The Associated Press. Also, bomb-sniffing dogs, more surveillance cameras and increased barriers separating runners from spectators.

A joint terrorism task force under supervision of the FBI will be involved in safety and security operations.

A goal is to preserve the traditional feel and character of the Boston Marathon, in its 118th running this year.

“We never forget the tragedy and the suffering that occurred last year,” said Tom Grilk, executive director of the Boston Athletic Association, in a press conference. “We also want to do our part in supporting the resilience that we all have come to know as Boston Strong. Our role at the Boston Athletic Association will be to do what we do, which is mainly putting on athletic events.”

Officials are promoting a simple slogan — if you see something, say something.

“Our security plan has been informed by what happened last year, and our collective evaluation of what worked well, what could have worked better and the lessons we learned,” said Kurt Schwartz, director of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency.

Runners won’t be allowed to wear backpacks, though fanny packs and fuel belts are OK.

Spectators are asked to abide by common-sense guidelines. They are discouraged from bringing backpacks or large coolers or wear costumes or masks.

Some areas of the course may include screening checkpoints for spectators, who are asked to carry items in clear, plastic bags. Further threat assessments and intelligence analysis will be conduced in the six weeks leading to race day.

“One of the lessons learned here, I think, is that the public, the spectators, the participants in this marathon are another part of the security of this marathon,” Massachusetts State Police Colonel/Superintendent Tim Alben said. “Be more vigilant, to pay attention what’s around them, who’s around them, strange things that might occur.”

There hasn’t been specific intelligence indicating threats for this year’s race, but organizers are taking precautions should one pop up.

They are confident, though, encouraging people to visit popular areas, such as Boylston Street, the road where the finish line lies and where the two bombs went off last year.

U.S. Olympians added to Boston Marathon field

Tori Bowie does not want to double at world champs

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Add Tori Bowie to the list of sprinters not looking to double at the world championships in August.

Bowie won the 100m and finished third in the 200m at the USATF Outdoor Championships, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast.

That put her on the U.S. team for worlds in London in both sprints.

But Bowie, who earned Rio 100m silver and 200m bronze, was exhausted after four days of racing in Sacramento heat that eclipsed 110 degrees.

“I for sure don’t want to do the double [at worlds],” Bowie said Sunday. “I just wanted to give myself an option [to race the 100m or the 200m].”

Bowie said she and her coaches will probably decide her racing schedule for worlds in the next two to three weeks.

“More than anything I wanted to try to get this 100m right and try to achieve a gold medal somewhere,” Bowie said, according to TeamUSA.org. “I don’t have a gold medal yet individually, so that’s my main concern right now.”

If Bowie drops the 100m, Olympian Morolake Akinosun is in line to take her spot. If she drops the 200m, it’s Ariana Washington.

“I already experienced that, I did the double in Rio,” Bowie said. “I collected my two medals that I wanted to collect in both events. Right now, I’m satisfied.”

Deajah Stevens and Christian Coleman also made the U.S. team in both the 100m and 200m and are expected to compete in both events.

Meanwhile, both Olympic 200m champions — Usain Bolt and Elaine Thompson — are expected to sit out the 200m in London to focus on the 100m.

World 200m silver medalist Justin Gatlin, 2012 Olympic 200m champion Allyson Felix and LaShawn Merritt all pulled out of the 200m at USATF Outdoors, ruling out world championships doubles.

Gatlin doubled in 2015. Felix doubled in 2011 (200m and 400m) and tried to for Rio but finished fourth in the 200m at the Olympic Trials. Merritt raced the 200m and 400m in Rio.

Both Olympic 400m champions — Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa and Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas — plan to also race the 200m at worlds.

MORE: Centrowitz recovers from ‘rock bottom’ to make world team

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World Taekwondo Federation drops acronym due to ‘negative connotations’

Taekwondo
World Taekwondo
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The World Taekwondo Federation dropped its “WTF” acronym due to “negative connotations” and changed its logo and its name to World Taekwondo.

“In the digital age, the acronym of our federation has developed negative connotations unrelated to our organization,” World Taekwondo President Chungwon Choue said in a press release. “It was important that we rebranded to better engage with our fans. World Taekwondo is distinctive and simple to understand.”

The move was almost two years in the making.

In December 2015, World Taekwondo said it planned to lessen the use of the WTF acronym for marketing purposes, according to Inside the Games, but at the time did not plan to fully change the name.

MORE: Olympic taekwondo star accused of sexual abuse

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