Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon announces increased security

Leave a comment

Boston Marathon organizers detailed what they called a comprehensive security plan Monday for the April 21 race, following last year’s bombings that killed three people and injured more than 260.

Some 36,000 runners — 9,000 more than last year — and perhaps more than one million spectators are expected for the 26.2-mile race on Patriots’ Day.

They will face measures such as 3,500 police officers — uniformed and in plain clothes and more than double last year’s amount, according to The Associated Press. Also, bomb-sniffing dogs, more surveillance cameras and increased barriers separating runners from spectators.

A joint terrorism task force under supervision of the FBI will be involved in safety and security operations.

A goal is to preserve the traditional feel and character of the Boston Marathon, in its 118th running this year.

“We never forget the tragedy and the suffering that occurred last year,” said Tom Grilk, executive director of the Boston Athletic Association, in a press conference. “We also want to do our part in supporting the resilience that we all have come to know as Boston Strong. Our role at the Boston Athletic Association will be to do what we do, which is mainly putting on athletic events.”

Officials are promoting a simple slogan — if you see something, say something.

“Our security plan has been informed by what happened last year, and our collective evaluation of what worked well, what could have worked better and the lessons we learned,” said Kurt Schwartz, director of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency.

Runners won’t be allowed to wear backpacks, though fanny packs and fuel belts are OK.

Spectators are asked to abide by common-sense guidelines. They are discouraged from bringing backpacks or large coolers or wear costumes or masks.

Some areas of the course may include screening checkpoints for spectators, who are asked to carry items in clear, plastic bags. Further threat assessments and intelligence analysis will be conduced in the six weeks leading to race day.

“One of the lessons learned here, I think, is that the public, the spectators, the participants in this marathon are another part of the security of this marathon,” Massachusetts State Police Colonel/Superintendent Tim Alben said. “Be more vigilant, to pay attention what’s around them, who’s around them, strange things that might occur.”

There hasn’t been specific intelligence indicating threats for this year’s race, but organizers are taking precautions should one pop up.

They are confident, though, encouraging people to visit popular areas, such as Boylston Street, the road where the finish line lies and where the two bombs went off last year.

U.S. Olympians added to Boston Marathon field

U.S. women’s gymnastics World Championships team analysis

Gabby Douglas, Simone Biles
Leave a comment

The U.S. women’s gymnastics team that will try to win a fourth straight global title at the World Championships in three weeks in Glasgow, Scotland, is arguably the most accomplished in American history.

It’s the first time a U.S. men’s or women’s team for Worlds has included two past Olympic or World all-around champions — Simone Biles and Gabby Douglas.

It’s the first time a U.S. men’s or women’s team for Worlds has included any past individual Olympic champions — Douglas and Aly Raisman.

Biles, Douglas and Raisman were three of the seven women named to the team by USA Gymnastics following selection camp competition in Texas on Thursday night.

The others are 2014 World Championships team members MyKayla Skinner and Madison Kocian; Brenna Dowell, who traveled to the 2013 Worlds but didn’t compete, and Worlds rookie Maggie Nichols.

One of the seven women must be designated an alternate before Worlds, as nations can use a maximum of six in competition in Glasgow.

The team includes zero women under the age of 18, a first in U.S. gymnastics World Championships history. That hasn’t happened at the Olympics since 1952, according to

The U.S. roster is without Olympic team champions McKayla Maroney, who hasn’t competed since the 2013 Worlds, and Kyla Ross, who announced her withdrawal from Worlds team selection on Oct. 1 without citing a reason. The other member of the 2012 U.S. Olympic team, Jordyn Wieber, is retired.

At Worlds, the U.S.’ biggest competition will likely come from the other three women’s gymnastics powers — China, Romania and Russia. Russia’s early roster includes three members of its five-woman 2012 Olympic silver medal-winning team, including Viktoria Komova, the Olympic all-around silver medalist.

An interesting competition within the U.S. team could be which two women advance from Oct. 24 qualifying into the Worlds individual all-around final Oct. 29. If more than two U.S. women compete on all four events in qualifying, then the two with the highest overall scores advance to the all-around final.

MORE GYMNASTICS: A look at recent Olympians’ comebacks

Here’s a look at the U.S. team and each gymnast’s credentials:

Simone Biles: The two-time reigning World all-around champion and three-time reigning U.S. champion. The 18-year-old Texan could become the first woman to win three straight World all-around titles. She could also break Alicia Sacramone‘s U.S. record for career Worlds medals. Sacramone earned 10 medals over five Worlds. Biles has nine in her first two, after bagging a U.S. women’s record five medals at a single Worlds in 2014. Biles has won nine straight all-around competitions, with her last defeat coming March 30, 2013.

Gabby Douglas: The Olympic all-around champion will compete at Worlds for the first time since her 2011 debut. She took 31 months off from competition after London 2012, returning in March. She’s finished fourth, second and fifth in three all-around competitions this year, with Biles winning all of those titles.

Aly Raisman: The Olympic floor exercise champion is also at Worlds for the first time since 2011 after taking a 31-month break following London 2012. She’s finished third, fifth and third in three all-arounds this year, all won by Biles. Raisman earned the P&G Championships floor exercise title in August over Biles, the two-time reigning World champion in the event.

Maggie Nichols: The Little Canada, Minn., native whose Twitter handle is @MagsGotSwag12, finished second in the P&G Championships all-around, behind Biles and ahead of Raisman and Douglas. She was third at the 2014 P&G Championships and looked destined for her first Worlds team then until dislocating her left kneecap the following week.

Madison Kocian: She’s the P&G champion on uneven bars, the only apparatus for which she was used in the 2014 World Championships team final. The last American to win an Olympic or Worlds uneven bars title was Nastia Liukin in 2005.

Brenna Dowell: She made the 2013 Worlds team and traveled to Antwerp, Belgium, but was designated the alternate with Biles, Ross and Maroney competing in the all-around in qualifying. At that Worlds (but not this one), a maximum of three women per country could compete per apparatus. She was also an alternate for the 2014 Worlds team and is strongest on uneven bars and floor exercise. Dowell, who is taking a year off from competing for Oklahoma University, is the first U.S. women’s gymnast with NCAA experience to make an Olympic or Worlds team since Sacramone in 2011.

MyKayla Skinner: Skinner finished third on vault and fourth on floor exercise at the 2014 Worlds and then second to Biles in the all-around at the American Cup on March 7. She was second on vault and third on floor at the P&G Championships in August.

MORE GYMNASTICS: Analyzing U.S. men’s World Championships team

Rio Olympic equestrian may be moved outside Brazil

Leave a comment

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The head of the Brazilian Equestrian Confederation has warned that equestrian events at next year’s Rio de Janeiro Olympics might have to take place outside Brazil.

Luiz Roberto Giugni blasted the country’s Agriculture Ministry for delays in issuing documentation needed to allow horses brought into Brazil from Europe, the United States and Canada to leave the country.

He warned that if the ministry doesn’t act before the end of the month, “we run the risk of not having the event in Brazil.”

Regulations for bringing horses to and from Brazil are strict. The country is still subject to diseases affecting horses, including glanders, a lethal bacterial infection recently diagnosed in several horses here.

Guigni was speaking on Wednesday at an event in Sao Paulo.