Bode Miller

Bode Miller makes podium at World Cup Finals; Svindal concedes overall title

Leave a comment

Bode Miller finished third in the World Cup Finals super-G, while overall leader Aksel Lund Svindal was a disappointing 16th and conceded he will fall from the top of the standings over the final two races.

The six-time Olympic medalist Miller appeared to agonizingly miss his first World Cup win since 2011 by .01 of a second until the 26th and final skier, France’s Alexis Pinturault, nabbed victory in 1 minute, 13.71 seconds in Lenzerheide, Switzerland, on Thursday.

“It’s been a tough year,” said Miller, the Sochi Olympic super-G bronze medalist. “This kind of capped it off. I was happy with my attack today. I definitely skied like I wanted to win the race, which has been a challenge all year. Every time I ski hard, I crash or make such big mistakes. Unfortunately today was no different. … I just had 2.5 seconds worth of mistakes, probably, on that run.”

Pinturault, known for his giant slalom and slalom skills, won his first career World Cup super-G. Countryman Thomas Mermillod Blondin was second, .56 of a second behind, followed by Miller at .57.

Miller earned his fourth podium finish of the season after missing all of 2012-13 following knee surgery. He ranks seventh in the overall standings and is the only man in the top 11 without a race win this year.

“It’s been unbelievable frustrating to have the skiing be so fast that I feel like I could win almost every race, then come away with no wins at all,” Miller said. “Even though I’m old, I’m not like broken down, really. Mentally, I think I’m as tough as any of these kids.”

The Norwegian Svindal entered the race having already clinched the season title in the super-G, but he continued his pedestrian recent form by finishing 16th.

Svindal hasn’t made a race podium since Jan. 26 — including the Olympics — and matched his worst super-G result in three years.

By contrast, Svindal’s rival for the overall title, Austrian Marcel Hirscher, was 12th in just his sixth super-G start in the last four years. Hirscher cut Svindal’s overall lead down to 19 points with two races left.

Those two races are a giant slalom Saturday and a slalom Sunday. Hirscher is a better giant slalom skier than Svindal and the reigning world champion and World Cup champion in slalom. Svindal said he won’t race the slalom and conceded the overall title to Hirscher after the super-G.

“It’s not the way I wanted to end it,” Svindal said. “It puts me out of the chase for the overall title, what can you do.

“I wasn’t good enough [Thursday].”

Olympic giant slalom champion Ted Ligety took fifth and fell from third to fourth in the overall standings, behind Pinturault by 50 points.

“I’m happy with being fifth place, that’s for sure,” Ligety said. “Definitely one of my better super-G results. I definitely feel like there’s a lot more speed on the hill that I left up there, but to get a top five is still a good day.”

Ligety now moves onto the giant slalom Saturday, where he needs Hirscher to finish off the podium to have any chance of repeating as the season champion in that discipline.

“I feel like I have a good chance of getting in there and hopefully winning,” Ligety said. “I don’t know how good of a chance I have of Marcel not getting on the podium. It’s going to be tough.”

Lenzerheide super-G
1. Alexis Pinturault (FRA) 1:13.71
2. Thomas Mermillod Blondin (FRA) 1:14.27
3. Bode Miller (USA) 1:14.28
4. Matthias Mayer (AUT) 1:14.66
5. Ted Ligety (USA) 1:14.80
6. Christof Innerhofer (ITA) 1:14.85
7. Carlo Janka (SUI) 1:14.86
8. Kjetil Jansrud (NOR) 1:14.88
9. Otmar Striedinger (AUT) 1:14.95
9. Travis Ganong (USA) 1:14.95

Final super-G standings
1. Aksel Lund Svindal (NOR) — 346
2. Kjetil Jansrud (NOR) — 259
3. Patrick Kueng (SUI) — 255
5. Bode Miller (USA) — 220

Video: Hoefl-Riesch crashes in downhill

Yuzuru Hanyu wins record fourth straight Grand Prix Final; Nathan Chen on podium

Yuzuru Hanyu
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu became the first singles skater to win four straight Grand Prix Finals, while 17-year-old Nathan Chen is the second-youngest men’s medalist in the event’s 22-year history.

The Olympic champion Hanyu held on to win despite scoring 10 points fewer than Chen in the free skate in Marseille, France, on Saturday. Chen finished second, 11.05 points behind.

Chen landed four quadruple jumps in his free skate with no falls. Hanyu fell once and singled a Lutz.

Chen, in his first senior season, became the first U.S. men’s medalist at the Grand Prix Final since Evan Lysacek and Johnny Weir earned gold and bronze in 2009.

Only Russian Yevgeny Plushenko won a men’s Grand Prix Final medal at a younger age, a bronze at 16 in the 1998-99 season.

U.S. champion Adam Rippon fell three times Saturday and finished last of six skaters.

Chen, the darling attraction of the 2010 U.S. Championships at age 10, is now the clear favorite going for the U.S. Championships in January.

NBCSN will air Grand Prix Final coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

MORE: Javier Fernandez builds toward last Olympic chance

Men’s Results
GOLD: Yuzuru Hanyu (JPN) — 293.90
SILVER: Nathan Chen (USA) — 282.85
BRONZE: Shoma Uno (JPN) — 282.51
4. Javier Fernandez (ESP) — 268.77
5. Patrick Chan (CAN) — 266.75
6. Adam Rippon (USA) — 233.10

Yevgenia Medvedeva repeats as Grand Prix Final winner, misses Yuna Kim record

Yevgenia Medvedeva
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Russian Yevgenia Medvedeva extended one of the most dominant runs in recent history, repeating as Grand Prix Final champion on Saturday.

Medvedeva recovered from stepping out of her opening jump — a shocking error for her — to total 227.66 points, the second-highest score under an 11-year-old judging system. The 17-year-old just missed Yuna Kim‘s record 228.56 from the 2010 Olympics.

Medvedeva, who last lost in November 2015, won by 9.33 points over Japan’s Satoko Miyahara in Marseille, France. Russian Anna Pogorilaya was third, followed by Canadian Kaetlyn Osmond.

Miyahara, Pogorilaya and Osmond all tallied personal-best free skates.

Medvedeva made that early mistake skating to music from “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” a 2011 film relating to the 9/11 attacks. It’s a controversial program choice that includes, at one point, the voice of George W. Bush declaring that two airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center.

“I’m happy, but I’m so sad about my mistake on my first jump,” Medvedeva said.

Nobody has finished within five points of Medvedeva during this winning streak, which included the 2016 European and World Championships and this perfect Grand Prix season. She’s seeking the first perfect season, including Grand Prix Final and world titles, since countrywoman Irina Slutskaya in 2004-05.

No U.S. woman qualified for the Grand Prix Final for the first time since 2008.

NBCSN will air Grand Prix Final coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

MORE: Javier Fernandez builds toward last Olympic chance

Women’s Results
GOLD: Yevgenia Medvedeva (RUS) — 227.66
SILVER: Satoko Miyahara (JPN) — 218.33
BRONZE: Anna Pogorilaya (RUS) — 216.47
4. Kaetlyn Osmond (CAN) — 212.45
5. Maria Sotskova (RUS) — 198.79
6. Yelena Radionova (RUS) — 188.81