Oscar Pistorius

Ballistics investigator testifies at Oscar Pistorius trial

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Oscar Pistorius fired at a slightly downward angle when he fatally shot his girlfriend last year, a police ballistics investigator testified at the double amputee Olympian’s murder trial Tuesday.

Pistorius and the prosecution agree that he was not wearing his prosthetic legs when he shot through his bathroom door on the early morning of Valentine’s Day 2013, killing Reeva Steenkamp.

South African police Capt. Christian Mangena said he reconstructed the scene of the shooting inside Pistorius’ Pretoria home one month later.

Mangena received and reassembled the broken bathroom door that Pistorius shot through from the outside, brought the door back inside Pistorius’ house and measured the height of four bullet holes.

One of the bullets left a ricochet mark on a wall inside the bathroom where Steenkamp was hit. Mangena said he used a rod and laser to determine that Pistorius fired that shot from a downward angle of five to six degrees.

Mangena also said he was present when height measurements of Pistorius with and without his prosthetic legs were taken.

The highest bullet mark on the door was 104.3cm. Pistorius stood 184cm with his prosthetic legs and 155cm without them, Mangena said. His elbow level was 126cm with his prosthetic legs and 96cm without them.

Pistorius said that when he shot, he was not wearing his prosthetic legs and felt extremely vulnerable, believing he was firing at an intruder inside his locked bathroom. The State argued last year that Pistorius was wearing his prosthetic legs, but the prosecution now believes Pistorius was not wearing them as he said.

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, could face 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder.

The trial is expected to resume at 3:30 a.m. ET on Wednesday.

Here’s NBC News’ coverage of the Pistorius trial.

Ireland’s history at the Olympics

Zika won’t stop Olympics; only war has done that, historian says

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JULY 07:  A general view of the Christ The Redeemer statue atop the Corcovado on July 7, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The world’s best known Olympic historian says it will take something more destructive than the Zika virus to cancel the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

David Wallechinsky tells The Associated Press that “the only time the Games have been cancelled is in war — World War I and World War II. Other than that, nothing has done it.”

Wallechinsky says “it’s pretty late to move the Games, so I’m sure they’ll go forward” and open Aug. 5.

Brazil is the epicenter of the rapidly spreading mosquito-borne Zika epidemic, which is also generating rumors that South America’s first Games may be called off.

Brazil’s sports minister says that canceling the Games “is not in discussion,” and Rio organizers and the IOC have repeatedly shot down the notion it’s even being considered.

‘Race’ film clip of 1936 Olympic long jump (video)

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“Race,” a film about 1936 Olympic legend Jesse Owens‘ triumphs in the face of Nazi Germany, hits theaters Feb. 19.

In the above clip, Owens competes in long jump qualifying after receiving a tip from fellow jumper German Luz Long to avoid fouling on his last attempt to advance to the final.

Owens would then beat Long in the final, though the pair forged a friendship.

In other clips, Owens, played by Stephan James, speaks with his Ohio State coach, Larry Snyder, played by Jason Sudeikis. Watch that here.

Also, Owens discusses taking part in the Olympics amid racial prejudice in the U.S. Watch that here.

MORE: James discusses playing Owens in ‘Race’ | VIDEO: ‘Race’ trailer