Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius expected to testify with prosecution’s case wrapped

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The prosecution closed its case against Oscar Pistorius in the Olympian’s murder trial Tuesday.

Pistorius then made brief comments to media, and one of his lawyers said there’s “no choice” but to put Pistorius on the witness stand after the trial resumes Friday.

The trial is off the next two days to allow the defense time to contact and consult with witnesses who were not called to testify by the prosecution in the first 15 days of the trial.

Questions of if Pistorius would testify in his own defense were answered by lawyer Brian Webber after Tuesday’s session.

Pistorius’ plea explanation on March 3 indicated he would testify.

“I am advised that I will have an opportunity to deal with a comprehensive version of the events when I testify,” was read by one his lawyers.

Pistorius briefly spoke with reporters after Tuesday’s session in Pretoria.

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, is on trial for charges including the premeditated murder of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on the early morning of Valentine’s Day 2013.

He could face at least 25 years in prison if convicted of premeditated murder. He said he shot four times through a door, hitting and killing Steenkamp, thinking there was an intruder locked in his bathroom on Valentine’s Day 2013.

The prosecution said Pistorius shot after an argument with Steenkamp.

The court heard testimony Tuesday from three witnesses before the prosecution wrapped its case.

Police Capt. Francois Moller returned, one day after reading text messages between Pistorius and Steenkamp that showed arguing between the couple in the weeks before the shooting.

On Tuesday, Moller read a larger amount of loving text messages between the couple.

He also detailed the timing of calls made from one of Pistorius’ cell phones to Steenkamp on the day before the shooting and calls made from the cell phone after the shooting. Calls were made to emergency and security numbers, friends and family in the early morning after the shooting.

Police officer Adriaan Maritz testified about crime in the area around Pistorius’ home in Pretoria from January 2011 to April 2013.

Finally, Col. J.G. Vermeulen returned to the stand, after first doing so two weeks ago, and was questioned about an additional mark on the bathroom door that Pistorius shot through and said he broke into with a cricket bat.

Here’s NBC News’ coverage of the Pistorius trial.

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Qatar’s Barshim sets season’s best high jump record in Birmingham

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Qatar’s Mutaz Essa Barshim, who astonished the track and field world with his non-traditional hurdling technique on his way to becoming the reigning world champion in high jump this August, one-upped himself in Birmingham when he soared over the bar set to 2.40 meters. That’s just a smidge over 7 feet, 10 inches!

The men’s outdoor high jump world record is currently 2.45m, set by Cuba’s Javier Sotomayor in 1993.

At the 2017 Worlds, the 6-foot-2 Barshim cleared the bar at about 6 feet, 4 inches with his now famous feet-first maneuver.

At Birmingham’s Diamond League event his technique may have been conventional, but his final leap was no less breathtaking.

After trading jumps with Syria’s Majed Aldin Ghazal up to 2.35m, Ghazal decided to bow out, but the Qatari continued on. With the meet already won, Barshim raised the bar to 2.40m.

“I knew I had that jump in me but I needed that pressure on my shoulders,” Barshim said. “I love it here. I had the [meet] record here from 2014 and I also won in Birmingham last year so it is a lucky place for me.”

The 2.40m final jump for Barshim registered as a meet and season record. After climbing down off the landing pad, Barshim’s fellow jumping competitors mobbed him in celebration.

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MORE: Great Britain’s Mo Farah races and wins final track race in home country

Great Britain’s Mo Farah races and wins final track race in home country

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Great Britain’s 4-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah raced his final race on a U.K. track surface in Birmingham, winning the 3000m, as he crossed the line in 7 minutes 38.64 seconds in the final Diamond League event of the day.

Spain’s Adel Mechaal nipped at Farah’s heels heading into the final 200m, but the Brit’s kick, and the ovation from the home crowd, propelled Farah to victory.

“[The fans] have been amazing. This is what it is all about. This is what we dream of,” Farah said after the race.

At 34, Farah’s plans are to leave the 400m loop behind to pursue road racing in 2018.

“I now have to see what I will do on the road. I don’t think I’ll have the same pressure so I’ll go and enjoy it,” Farah said. “Running was a hobby when I was younger but it has become a job and I love it. It can be hard when you get the pressure but the roads will be something completely different.”

Immediately preceding Farah’s win in Birmingham, Allyson Felix of the U.S. finished second in the women’s 400m final behind Salwa Eid Naser of Bahrain.

“It has been a long few weeks so I was feeling tired out there so I just wanted to come out here and try to get it done but I came up just short,” Felix said. “Everyone is tired from London but I came and gave it my best effort.

“I am not sure about any future races this season, I am going to see how I recover from this.”

Earlier this month, Felix finished behind Naser when she took bronze in the 400m at the 2017 IAAF World Championships, where Phyllis Francis of the U.S. won gold, running a personal best 49.92 seconds. Francis finished fourth in Birmingham behind another U.S. middle distance athlete, Courtney Okolo who got the bronze.

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