Dara Torres

Catching up with Dara Torres

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Dara Torres is a 12-time Olympic medalist, swimming in five Games over a seven-Games stretch and retiring after the 2012 Olympic Trials.

Her 12 medals are tied for the most by a U.S. woman with fellow swimmers Natalie Coughlin and Jenny Thompson. Torres is now 46 and still spending plenty of time at the pool, watching her daughter, Tessa, at swim practice.

Tessa was 2 years old when her mom made her final Olympic Team in 2008. She’s now 7.

OlympicTalk recently caught up with Torres to look back on her career and discuss her current activities:

OlympicTalk: What was your favorite Olympic race?

Torres: My last individual event, the 50m free in Beijing. It was my favorite because it was my first time seeded first going into an Olympic final. So it was a different situation being in an Olympic Games final with everybody sort of gunning for me. I thrive on that. I ended up second [behind German Britta Steffen by. 01 of a second], but it still was my favorite race.

I think another reason it was my favorite race was because it was such a refreshing feeling [at the finish]. I hate losing, and when I touched the wall and lost by .01, obviously that’s going to live with me forever. But it’s also refreshing putting it all out there and leaving everything on the line. I did everything I could. On one hand it was bittersweet, losing by one hundredth of a second and on the other I did everything I could.

OlympicTalk: Who was your favorite competitor?

Torres: Jill Sterkel, [a 1976-88 Olympian]. She is very classy. She was tough, and she also left everything in the pool. She was older than me. My first race against her, I was 14 and she was 21.

There was one instance I was in a heat before her, in a preliminary round, and there was a false start, which back then you were allowed to have without being disqualified. I remember getting out of the pool, I was cold, and she was waiting to go after me, and she gave me her towel. She saw that I was shivering and cold. That was really classy. She was a fierce competitor, but she was nice out of the pool.

OlympicTalk: Would you have changed anything about your career, retiring after 1992 and 2000?

Torres: I don’t have any regrets of what I’ve done. Having taken that time off, it rejuvenated my love for the sport. I found passion for the sport. So that when I finished my last Olympic Trials in 2012, I had no regrets.

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OlympicTalk: Any thoughts about swimming again?

Torres: That’s a hard question for me because every time I have retired, I have come back. After my sixth Olympic Trials, it has hit me that I’m really done this time.

OlympicTalk: Which active swimmers do you like to watch?

Torres: I like swimmers who have versatility. Missy Franklin obviously swims a lot of different strokes. I swam sprint freestyle and a little butterfly. It’s always fun to watch someone who can do so many different events. I like watching Missy Franklin, Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte.

source: Getty Images
Dara Torres holds her daughter, Tessa, then 6, at the 2012 Olympic Trials. (Getty Images)

OlympicTalk: How is your daughter, Tessa, taking to the pool?

Torres: She’s a little water bug. She loves water.

I’m going to take her in about an hour to swim practice. She does other stuff, too. If she wants to continue swimming, that’s great. I don’t know if that’s what she wants to do, but she seems to love it right now. She also does dance and lacrosse.

OlympicTalk: What have you been up to?

Torres: I have been very busy with sponsors and doing motivational talks. I’m going to a conference tomorrow for a couple days.

It’s also fun being home and being a mom. In addition to my daughter, I have two stepkids now. I’m busy shuttling them to different activities. It’s a very Sally Homemaker kind of life with other stuff on the side. I really enjoy it.

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Ashley Wagner tops Skate America short program

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HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. (AP) — Ashley Wagner topped the Skate America short program Friday night with 69.50 points, building on her second-place finish from last season’s world championships.

Japan’s Mai Mihara, making her Grand Prix Series debut at 17, was second at 65.75, and U.S. champion Gracie Gold third at 64.87.

The free skate will determine the champion Saturday at Sears Centre Arena (live on NBC and the NBC Sports app at 4:30 p.m. ET). Full results are here.

Wagner performed with a fierce and determined style, delivering a technically solid and entertaining program to “Sweet Dreams” by the Eurhythmics.

“I capitalized on the momentum (from worlds) going into the summer,” said Wagner, the 2012 Skate America winner. “It inspired me to train even harder than I had been because it showed me that my training got me onto that podium. It motivated me and made it a realistic goal to get onto that Olympic podium, and I can almost taste it. It’s a totally new season. I’m hopefully a different athlete from that Worlds event and I think it’s just about building on that from here on out.”

Mihara fell during her warmup, which she said relaxed her during her performance.

“I think for my first Grand Prix event, I did a good job,” she said.

Gold, coming off a disappointing fourth-place finish in the world championships, fell on her triple flip, but otherwise was solid in her performance to a tango.

“I had a hiccup on the triple flip, but I went after everything,” Gold said. “I just need to keep working on the program and just keep getting it out there.”

Gold said the months after the world championships were difficult and affected her training.

“It was a pretty hard summer,” she said. “I had trouble getting going and getting my feet under me for some reason. I felt I had let myself down. No one else felt the intense shame that I felt, but it was just so internal that I had trouble getting back out there. But as soon as I got the momentum going, I’ve been feeling excellent.”

Three-time World champion Mao Asada of Japan, hampered by a knee injury, was fifth.

In pairs, Russia’s Evgenia Tarasova and Vladimir Morozov took a commanding lead program with a score of 75.24. Americans Haven Denney and Brandon Frazier, who missed last season with a knee injury to Denney, were second at 67.29, and Canadians Julianne Seguin and Charlie Bilodeau followed at 66.49.

Tarasova and Morozov, fifth at the world championships, received high marks on their opening triple twist as well as their lifts, spins and footwork.

“Today we have a short program we did well,” Morozov said. “We have a personal best and were glad to have this moment.”

MORE: Scott Hamilton diagnosed with brain tumor for third time

Scott Hamilton diagnosed with brain tumor for third time

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 03:  Former figure skater and Olympic gold medalist Scott Hamilton onstage during A Capitol Fourth - Rehearsals at U.S. Capitol, West Lawn, on July 3, 2016 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Capital Concerts)
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Olympic figure skating champion Scott Hamilton said he was diagnosed with a benign pituitary brain tumor for a third time.

Hamilton, who took gold in Sarajevo in 1984, underwent chemotherapy to treat testicular cancer in 1997 and was twice previously diagnosed with brain tumors and had surgery, in 2004 and 2010.

“I didn’t have any symptoms, I just went in for my normal check-up, and they found the beginnings of the brain tumor coming back,” the 58-year-old Hamilton said. “I have a unique hobby of collecting life-threatening illness. … It’s six years later, and it decided that it wanted an encore.”

From People magazine:

Hamilton learned of the tumor at a routine check-up and is currently exploring all his treatment options before symptoms begin presenting.

“I’ll tell anybody that will listen: If you’re ever facing anything, get as many diagnoses as you possibly can,” he says. “The more you truly understand what you’re up against, the better decision you’re going to make.”

Hamilton was in New York on Friday to promote U.S. Figure Skating’s “Get Up” campaign.

“It’s all about shrugging it off, whatever’s going on, whether it be bullying at school, whether it be a setback in health, you just get up,” Hamilton said. “Not only to bring the young people that love skating together, but to bring the broader population into the fold.”

Hamilton said that surviving cancer was the moment in his life that he most associated with the “Get Up” campaign.

“Chemotherapy for months was devastating, but it’s endurable,” Hamilton said. “I don’t want to scare anybody from being treated for cancer, because I’m here, 20 years later, but the surgery afterwards was 38 staples, and I’m a little person. Getting up, getting back on the ice and performing again, quickly, was kind of my ‘Get Up’ moment.”

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