Dara Torres

Catching up with Dara Torres

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Dara Torres is a 12-time Olympic medalist, swimming in five Games over a seven-Games stretch and retiring after the 2012 Olympic Trials.

Her 12 medals are tied for the most by a U.S. woman with fellow swimmers Natalie Coughlin and Jenny Thompson. Torres is now 46 and still spending plenty of time at the pool, watching her daughter, Tessa, at swim practice.

Tessa was 2 years old when her mom made her final Olympic Team in 2008. She’s now 7.

OlympicTalk recently caught up with Torres to look back on her career and discuss her current activities:

OlympicTalk: What was your favorite Olympic race?

Torres: My last individual event, the 50m free in Beijing. It was my favorite because it was my first time seeded first going into an Olympic final. So it was a different situation being in an Olympic Games final with everybody sort of gunning for me. I thrive on that. I ended up second [behind German Britta Steffen by. 01 of a second], but it still was my favorite race.

I think another reason it was my favorite race was because it was such a refreshing feeling [at the finish]. I hate losing, and when I touched the wall and lost by .01, obviously that’s going to live with me forever. But it’s also refreshing putting it all out there and leaving everything on the line. I did everything I could. On one hand it was bittersweet, losing by one hundredth of a second and on the other I did everything I could.

OlympicTalk: Who was your favorite competitor?

Torres: Jill Sterkel, [a 1976-88 Olympian]. She is very classy. She was tough, and she also left everything in the pool. She was older than me. My first race against her, I was 14 and she was 21.

There was one instance I was in a heat before her, in a preliminary round, and there was a false start, which back then you were allowed to have without being disqualified. I remember getting out of the pool, I was cold, and she was waiting to go after me, and she gave me her towel. She saw that I was shivering and cold. That was really classy. She was a fierce competitor, but she was nice out of the pool.

OlympicTalk: Would you have changed anything about your career, retiring after 1992 and 2000?

Torres: I don’t have any regrets of what I’ve done. Having taken that time off, it rejuvenated my love for the sport. I found passion for the sport. So that when I finished my last Olympic Trials in 2012, I had no regrets.

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OlympicTalk: Any thoughts about swimming again?

Torres: That’s a hard question for me because every time I have retired, I have come back. After my sixth Olympic Trials, it has hit me that I’m really done this time.

OlympicTalk: Which active swimmers do you like to watch?

Torres: I like swimmers who have versatility. Missy Franklin obviously swims a lot of different strokes. I swam sprint freestyle and a little butterfly. It’s always fun to watch someone who can do so many different events. I like watching Missy Franklin, Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte.

source: Getty Images
Dara Torres holds her daughter, Tessa, then 6, at the 2012 Olympic Trials. (Getty Images)

OlympicTalk: How is your daughter, Tessa, taking to the pool?

Torres: She’s a little water bug. She loves water.

I’m going to take her in about an hour to swim practice. She does other stuff, too. If she wants to continue swimming, that’s great. I don’t know if that’s what she wants to do, but she seems to love it right now. She also does dance and lacrosse.

OlympicTalk: What have you been up to?

Torres: I have been very busy with sponsors and doing motivational talks. I’m going to a conference tomorrow for a couple days.

It’s also fun being home and being a mom. In addition to my daughter, I have two stepkids now. I’m busy shuttling them to different activities. It’s a very Sally Homemaker kind of life with other stuff on the side. I really enjoy it.

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PyeongChang Olympic medals unveiled (photos)

PyeongChang Olympic medal
PyeongChang 2018
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The medals for the PyeongChang Winter Olympics were unveiled in a joint Seoul-New York City ceremony on Wednesday.

The Korean Hangul alphabet was incorporated into the medals’ edges to spell what translates to “PyeongChang Winter Olympics.”

Recent Winter Olympic medals include the Italian piazza design for Torino, the undulating surfaces for Vancouer and a patchwork quilt with diamond-shaped openings for Sochi.

The medals for the previous Olympics in South Korea — the 1988 Seoul Summer Games — were of the more traditional variety.

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MORE: What to watch every day of the PyeongChang Olympics

Medals from past Olympics:

Seoul 1988/Getty Images
Cindy Klassen
Torino 2006/Getty Images
Vancouver 2010
Sochi 2014/Getty Images

U.S. names women’s gymnastics team for world champs

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It was already assured, but now it’s official.

The U.S. women’s gymnastics team for the world championships named Wednesday includes zero Olympians.

As the wait continues for possible elite comebacks by Simone BilesGabby Douglas, Aly RaismanLaurie Hernandez and Madison Kocian, these four gymnasts will chase medals in Montreal in two weeks:

Ragan Smith
P&G Championships all-around winner
Olympic alternate

Smith was the clear favorite going into the P&G Championships, and she delivered. The Texan coached by 1991 World all-around champion Kim Zmeskal Burdette won by 3.4 points, which is greater than the average margin of victory of Biles’ four U.S. all-around titles.

The pressure is on Smith to keep an incredible streak alive. An American gymnast has won every Olympic and world all-around title since 2011. The biggest threat could be Romanian Larisa Iordache, who shared the all-around podium with Biles in 2014 and 2015.

With no team event at worlds this year, the focus is first and foremost on the all-around.

Morgan Hurd
P&G Championships all-around sixth-place finisher

Hurd, a first-year senior who competes in glasses, was adopted from China as a toddler and now lives with her mom in Delaware. She must have really impressed at this week’s selection camp to get a spot over P&G Championships all-around silver medalist Jordan Chiles, who was named an alternate.

Though she had struggles at P&Gs, Hurd is capable of one of the world’s best floor exercise routines.

Ashton Locklear
P&G Championships uneven bars silver medalist
Olympic alternate

The “veteran” of this team at age 19 and the only one with world championships experience. Locklear was probably the closest of the alternates to making the Olympic team, getting edged out by Kocian for the uneven bars specialist spot.

Locklear missed an uneven bars medal at 2014 Worlds by .017. She was second to Riley McCusker on bars last month at P&Gs, where she wasn’t performing her most difficult set.

Jade Carey
P&G Championships vault winner

Carey hopes to follow the path of Kayla Williams, who in 2009 went from not even being an elite-level gymnast to winning the world vault title. Carey, 17, struggled with her Amanar at P&Gs, falling once and nearly sitting it down on the second day.

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