Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius faces harsh cross-examination at murder trial

4 Comments

Oscar Pistorius was told to look at a graphic photo of dead girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp‘s head and to “take responsibility for what you’ve done” by a prosecutor at his murder trial Wednesday.

A crime scene photo of one side of Steenkamp’s head, bloodied from a bullet wound, was displayed on screens around the room, and shown on video streams on the first day of his cross-examination.

It came after prosecutor Gerrie Nel showed a clip of this video news report of Pistorius at a gun shooting range, firing at a watermelon that exploded on impact.

“You know that the same happened to Reeva’s head,” Nel said just before the photo of Steenkamp came on the screens. “It exploded. Have a look. I’m going to show you, Mr. Pistorius, it had the exact same effect, the bullet that went into her head.”

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, said he thought Steenkamp was an intruder locked in his bathroom when he shot four times through a locked door, hitting and killing her inside on Valentine’s Day 2013. The prosecution claims Pistorius killed Steenkamp after an argument.

He faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder. If not found guilty of premeditated murder, he could be convicted of culpable homicide, South Africa’s version of manslaughter for negligent killing.

Graphic photos of Steenkamp had been shown during the trial on previous days, accidentally while scanning through slideshows and only for brief seconds. The photo was up for about one minute Wednesday.

“Have a look there,” Nel said to Pistorius. “I know you don’t want to because you don’t want to take responsibility, but it’s time that you look at it. Take responsibility for what you’ve done, Mr. Pistorius.”

Pistorius, who had thrown up during graphic autopsy testimony March 10, had a green bucket nearby in the witness box Wednesday. Pistorius tried not to look at the photo next to his face, according to court reports. He responded emotionally.

“I’ve taken responsibility … waiting for my time on this stand to tell my story for the respect of Reeva and for myself,” Pistorius said, his voice trembling. “I’ve taken responsibility. But I will not look at a picture where I’m tormented by what I saw and felt that night. As I picked Reeva up, my fingers touched her head. I remember. I don’t have to look at a picture. I was there.”

Pistorius sobbed and buried his head in his hands, causing Nel to ask for an adjournment.

Earlier, Nel aggressively began his cross-examination by telling Pistorius, “Say yes, I shot and killed Reeva Steenkamp.”

“I did,” Pistorius said, repeating that he “made a mistake” and adding, “I’m human. I make many faults. I have sins.”

Later, Nel questioned Pistorius about crime scene details and accused him of lying in his version of events and having rehearsed answers.

“My memory isn’t very good at the moment,” Pistorius said. “I’m under a lot of pressure sitting here. It’s not easy. I’m defending for my life.”

Pistorius repeatedly said that the shooting was an accident.

“Before thinking, out of fear, I fired four shots,” he said. “When I realized the scale of what was happening, I stopped firing, and I stood there, and I was in shock.

“I didn’t intend to shoot anyone. I fired my firearm before I could think, before I even had a moment to comprehend what was happening. I believed someone was coming out the toilet.”

Here’s NBC News’ full coverage of the trial.

The trial is scheduled to resume at 3:30 a.m. ET on Thursday with more cross-examining from Nel

“I’m not going to go away,” Nel told Pistorius shortly before the end of Wednesday’s proceedings.

Video: Toronto mayor Rob Ford adds Ben Johnson to campaign team

Zika won’t stop Olympics; only war has done that, historian says

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JULY 07:  A general view of the Christ The Redeemer statue atop the Corcovado on July 7, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
Leave a comment

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The world’s best known Olympic historian says it will take something more destructive than the Zika virus to cancel the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

David Wallechinsky tells The Associated Press that “the only time the Games have been cancelled is in war — World War I and World War II. Other than that, nothing has done it.”

Wallechinsky says “it’s pretty late to move the Games, so I’m sure they’ll go forward” and open Aug. 5.

Brazil is the epicenter of the rapidly spreading mosquito-borne Zika epidemic, which is also generating rumors that South America’s first Games may be called off.

Brazil’s sports minister says that canceling the Games “is not in discussion,” and Rio organizers and the IOC have repeatedly shot down the notion it’s even being considered.

‘Race’ film clip of 1936 Olympic long jump (video)

Leave a comment

“Race,” a film about 1936 Olympic legend Jesse Owens‘ triumphs in the face of Nazi Germany, hits theaters Feb. 19.

In the above clip, Owens competes in long jump qualifying after receiving a tip from fellow jumper German Luz Long to avoid fouling on his last attempt to advance to the final.

Owens would then beat Long in the final, though the pair forged a friendship.

In other clips, Owens, played by Stephan James, speaks with his Ohio State coach, Larry Snyder, played by Jason Sudeikis. Watch that here.

Also, Owens discusses taking part in the Olympics amid racial prejudice in the U.S. Watch that here.

MORE: James discusses playing Owens in ‘Race’ | VIDEO: ‘Race’ trailer