Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius, Reeva Steenkamp were talking when he shot, prosecutor says

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The lead prosecutor in Oscar Pistorius‘ murder trial said Pistorius and girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp were talking when he fatally shot her, a claim Pistorius denied Friday.

“That’s the only reasonable explanation,” said prosecutor Gerrie Nel, who has said that Pistorius killed Steenkamp after an argument on the early morning of Valentine’s Day 2013.

Pistorius has said he didn’t hear Steenkamp say anything when he was approaching a toilet door with his 9mm pistol, believing an intruder was locked inside.

Pistorius said he screamed for the intruder to get out of his house and for Steenkamp to call the police, thinking Steenkamp was still in bed. Steenkamp was actually behind the door. He then shot four times through the locked door, killing Steenkamp inside.

“She would have been terrified, but I don’t think that would have led her to scream out,” Pistorius said. “I think she would have kept quiet for that reason.”

Nel called it “the most improbable part” of Pistorius’ account, that he didn’t hear Steenkamp talk while three meters away from him when he shot.

“She wasn’t scared of anything,” Nel told Pistorius. “Except you.”

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder. If not found guilty of premeditated murder, he could be convicted of culpable homicide, South Africa’s version of manslaughter for negligent killing.

Neighbors previously testified that they heard female screams coming from Pistorius’ house that night. Nel said Thursday that Steenkamp “ran away screaming” after an argument. Pistorius said he couldn’t hear anything while he shot due to his ears ringing from the decibels of his four gunshots.

“There are many times that I’m haunted by what she probably thought in the last moments that she lived,” Pistorius said Friday, his third day of cross-examination. “I wish she let me know she was there [behind the door], and she did not do that.”

Earlier, Judge Thokozile Masipa told Nel to stop calling Pistorius “a liar” while questioning him. Nel obliged and, through the rest of the day’s proceedings, described Pistorius’ testimony as “not true,” “a lie,” “contradictory versions” and “so far-fetched.”

Pistorius rubbed his eyes during answers and was asked by Nel why he was emotional.

“Because this is the night I lost the person I care about,” Pistorius said. “I don’t understand how people don’t understand that.”

Here’s NBC News’ full coverage of the trial.

The trial is scheduled to resume at 3:30 a.m. ET on Monday with more cross-examining from Nel.

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Yuzuru Hanyu wins record fourth straight Grand Prix Final; Nathan Chen on podium

Yuzuru Hanyu
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Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu became the first singles skater to win four straight Grand Prix Finals, while 17-year-old Nathan Chen is the second-youngest men’s medalist in the event’s 22-year history.

The Olympic champion Hanyu held on to win despite scoring 10 points fewer than Chen in the free skate in Marseille, France, on Saturday. Chen finished second, 11.05 points behind.

Chen landed four quadruple jumps in his free skate with no falls. Hanyu fell once and singled a Lutz.

Chen, in his first senior season, became the first U.S. men’s medalist at the Grand Prix Final since Evan Lysacek and Johnny Weir earned gold and bronze in 2009.

Only Russian Yevgeny Plushenko won a men’s Grand Prix Final medal at a younger age, a bronze at 16 in the 1998-99 season.

U.S. champion Adam Rippon fell three times Saturday and finished last of six skaters.

Chen, the darling attraction of the 2010 U.S. Championships at age 10, is now the clear favorite going for the U.S. Championships in January.

NBCSN will air Grand Prix Final coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

MORE: Javier Fernandez builds toward last Olympic chance

Men’s Results
GOLD: Yuzuru Hanyu (JPN) — 293.90
SILVER: Nathan Chen (USA) — 282.85
BRONZE: Shoma Uno (JPN) — 282.51
4. Javier Fernandez (ESP) — 268.77
5. Patrick Chan (CAN) — 266.75
6. Adam Rippon (USA) — 233.10

Yevgenia Medvedeva repeats as Grand Prix Final winner, misses Yuna Kim record

Yevgenia Medvedeva
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Russian Yevgenia Medvedeva extended one of the most dominant runs in recent history, repeating as Grand Prix Final champion on Saturday.

Medvedeva recovered from stepping out of her opening jump — a shocking error for her — to total 227.66 points, the second-highest score under an 11-year-old judging system. The 17-year-old just missed Yuna Kim‘s record 228.56 from the 2010 Olympics.

Medvedeva, who last lost in November 2015, won by 9.33 points over Japan’s Satoko Miyahara in Marseille, France. Russian Anna Pogorilaya was third, followed by Canadian Kaetlyn Osmond.

Miyahara, Pogorilaya and Osmond all tallied personal-best free skates.

Medvedeva made that early mistake skating to music from “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” a 2011 film relating to the 9/11 attacks. It’s a controversial program choice that includes, at one point, the voice of George W. Bush declaring that two airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center.

“I’m happy, but I’m so sad about my mistake on my first jump,” Medvedeva said.

Nobody has finished within five points of Medvedeva during this winning streak, which included the 2016 European and World Championships and this perfect Grand Prix season. She’s seeking the first perfect season, including Grand Prix Final and world titles, since countrywoman Irina Slutskaya in 2004-05.

No U.S. woman qualified for the Grand Prix Final for the first time since 2008.

NBCSN will air Grand Prix Final coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

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Women’s Results
GOLD: Yevgenia Medvedeva (RUS) — 227.66
SILVER: Satoko Miyahara (JPN) — 218.33
BRONZE: Anna Pogorilaya (RUS) — 216.47
4. Kaetlyn Osmond (CAN) — 212.45
5. Maria Sotskova (RUS) — 198.79
6. Yelena Radionova (RUS) — 188.81