Shaun White

Slopestyle’s injury rate too high for Olympics, IOC official says

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Might slopestyle’s first Olympics have been its last?

Ski and snowboard slopestyle have “the potential” to be dropped from the Olympics if they don’t lessen “unacceptably high” injury rates, said an International Olympic Committee official who monitors Olympian injuries.

“Right now the injury rate as it was in Sochi was too high to be a sport that we have in the Olympics,” said Lars Engebretsen, head of scientific activities at the IOC’s medical and scientific department, according to The Associated Press.

Engebretsen said ski and snowboard slopestyle injury rates were “much higher than any other sport in Sochi.”

Shaun White pulled out of snowboard slopestyle one day before the competition, citing injury risk. Another medal threat, Norway’s Torstein Horgmo, broke a collarbone in a training crash in Sochi and withdrew. Canadian favorite Mark McMorris suffered a broken rib at the Winter X Games on Jan. 25 and won bronze in Sochi behind American Sage Kotsenburg.

“I can say what I feel: That sport should change, otherwise we shouldn’t have it. But the IOC may not follow that,” Engebretsen told the AP in Monaco, calling slopestyle “problematic.” “Something has to be done with that sport.”

Another new Olympic sport, ski halfpipe, had seen more major injuries among its elite competitors in the months and years leading into the Olympics, but Engebretsen focused on slopestyle.

“Slopestyle is exciting,” Engebretsen told the AP. “But it’s just become, right now anyway, too exciting.”

USOC has ‘serious concerns’ about USA Curling

World Short Course Swimming Championships broadcast schedule

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 08:  Chad Le Clos of South Africa looks on before the second Semifinal of the Men's 200m Butterfly on Day 3 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 8, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)
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NBC Sports will live stream every session of the world short-course swimming championships in Windsor, Ontatio, from Tuesday through Sunday.

NBCSN will air live finals coverage Thursday, Friday and Sunday, plus highlights on Saturday. Universal HD will have finals coverage Tuesday and Wednesday.

The world short course championships are held in 25-meter pools, versus 50-meter pools for the Olympics.

This year’s meet includes 10 U.S. Olympians and Rio medalists Katinka Hosszu of Hungary, Mitch Larkin and Emily Seebohm of Australia, Chad le Clos of South Africa and Penny Oleksiak of Canada.

The daily event schedule is here. Full results will be here.

MORE: Hosszu takes Swimmer of the Year over Ledecky

Day Time (ET) Network
Tuesday 9:30 a.m. NBCSports.com/live
Tuesday 6:30 p.m. NBCSports.com/live
Tuesday 9 p.m.* Universal HD
Wednesday 9:30 a.m. NBCSports.com/live
Wednesday 6:30 p.m. NBCSports.com/live
Wednesday 9 p.m.* Universal HD
Thursday 9:30 a.m. NBCSports.com/live
Thursday 6:30 p.m. NBCSN/NBCSports.com/live
Friday 9:30 a.m. NBCSports.com/live
Friday 6:30 p.m. NBCSN/NBCSports.com/live
Saturday 9:30 a.m. NBCSports.com/live
Saturday 6:30 p.m. NBCSports.com/live
Saturday 9:30 p.m.* NBCSN/NBCSports.com/live
Sunday 9:30 a.m. NBCSports.com/live
Sunday 6:30 p.m. NBCSN/NBCSports.com/live

*Same-day delay coverage

U.S. bobsled, skeleton athletes ready to skip world championships

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 15:  Kyle Tress of the United States makes a run during the Men's Skeleton on Day 8 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Sliding Center Sanki on February 15, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)
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U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Olympians voted to recommend boycotting February’s world championships in Sochi if the event is not relocated out of the doping-tainted nation, according to The New York Times.

U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton’s athlete advisory committee voted unanimously in recent days, according to the report. Listed members of the committee include Olympic medalists Elana Meyers Taylor (bobsled) and Matthew Antoine (skeleton) and skeleton Olympian Kyle Tress.

“There’s tremendous support to skip this event, and I think it’s the right decision,” Tress said, according to the report.

At least 15 Russian medalists from the Sochi Olympics, including bobsledders and skeleton sliders, were on a state-run doping program leading into those Winter Games, according to the newspaper’s report in May. Russian doping samples were also tampered with at the Sochi Olympics, according to the report.

Those are primary reasons why bobsled and skeleton athletes in the U.S. and Europe have voiced concern about competing in Sochi in February.

Olympic champions Lizzy Yarnold (skeleton) and Steven Holcomb (bobsled) said earlier this fall that they may skip worlds, and men’s skeleton stars Martins and Tomass Dukurs might, too, according to Latvian media.

“We discussed this as a team, we’re up in the air,” Holcomb said last month. “We don’t know what we’re going to do yet. Safety is a concern. What are the chances I go there, and all of a sudden Russian anti-doping tests me, and I [falsely] test positive? That wouldn’t surprise me in the least. Being outspoken, yeah I’m a little nervous about going there.”

On July 19, following rampant Russian anti-doping issues, the IOC asked all winter sports federations to “freeze their preparations for major events in Russia, such as world championships … and to actively look for alternative organizers.”

The IOC later clarified that statement, telling federations it did not apply to events whose host cities were already chosen, according to Inside the Games. The 2017 World Bobsled and Skeleton Championships were awarded to Sochi in June 2013.

The International Bobsled and Skeleton Federation (IBSF) said it will not comment until after the second part of McLaren report into Russian doping is published Friday.

The World Cup bobsled and skeleton season started last weekend in Whistler, B.C. Both Russians who won 2014 Olympic skeleton medals competed in Whistler, seven months after the New York Times reported their names were on the Sochi doping list.

Alexander Tretiakov, a 2014 Olympic champion, finished second in Whistler, one spot ahead of Antoine. Elena Nikitina, a 2014 Olympic bronze medalist, finished 17th out of 25 racers in Whistler.

Nikitina won bronze in Sochi by .04 over American Katie Uhlaender. Uhlaender did not race in Whistler but is on the U.S. team for World Cups this season.

“Sochi is in Russia, and it’s the place where the cheating happened,” Uhlaender said, according to The New York Times. “I’m confused at how the IOC said what it said, and we’re still holding our world championships there.”

MORE: Bobsled, luge, skeleton broadcast schedule