Johan Bruyneel

Lance Armstrong’s longtime team manager banned 10 years

6 Comments

Johan Bruyneel, the man at the helm of Lance Armstrong‘s cycling teams for all seven of his stripped Tour de France titles, was banned 10 years for involvement in “doping conspiracy,” the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said Tuesday.

The Belgian Bruyneel “was at the apex of a conspiracy to commit widespread doping on the USPS and Discovery Channel teams spanning many years and many riders,” a three-member, independent arbitration panel concluded.

A team trainer and team doctor from Armstrong and Bruyneel’s U.S. Postal Service teams were also banned, for eight years. Armstrong has already been banned for life.

“From the beginning, our investigation has focused on ridding cycling of those entrusted to care for the well-being of athletes who abuse their position of trust and influence to assist or encourage the use of performance-enhancing drugs to defraud sport and clean athletes,” USADA CEO Travis Tygart said in a press release. “There is no excuse for any team director, doctor or other athlete support person who corrupts the very sport and the athletes they are supposed to protect.”

Bruyneel encouraged athletes to use performance-enhancing products such as EPO, blood transfusions, testosterone and cortisone, the panel said.

The Panel found that Bruyneel trafficked in performance-enhancing drugs and “was engaged in the allocation of team-related resources… causing a variety of prohibited doping substances and methods to be used expressly for the purpose of gaining an unfair advantage for the teams and cyclists he managed in cycling events.” In addition, the Panel found that Bruyneel himself “profited considerably from the successes of the teams and riders he managed during the relevant period.”

Bruyneel refused to testify at his four-day hearing in London in December 2013, when 17 witness, including eight cyclists, did testify. Bruyneel presented no fact witnesses on his own behalf, USADA said. His ban runs through June 11, 2022.

Bruyneel said on his website he is debating his next step, perhaps appealing to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

“I do not dispute that there are certain elements of my career that I wish had been different,” a blog post read. “Nor do I dispute that doping was a fact of life in the peloton for a considerable period of time. However, a very small minority of us has been used as scapegoats for an entire generation.”

Bruyneel said he may decide to “try to expose the hypocrisy of what USADA has put me and others through.”

“In due course, I will take the time to give a full account of events within my knowledge,” he said.

Video: Meb Keflezighi stuns to win Boston Marathon

Ryan Lochte, with new coach, races in first meet since Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Ryan Lochte is back in the competition pool.

The 12-time Olympic medalist, suspended from USA Swimming and international meets through June, won a 200-yard individual medley at the U.S. Masters nationals in Riverside, Calif., on Friday. He also finished second in a 100-yard breaststroke.

Full results are here.

Lochte has moved to the Los Angeles area and is now coached by the University of Southern California’s Dave Salo until his fiancée’s baby is born (likely June). After that, they will re-evaluate his plan, Salo said.

Lochte was formerly coached by Gregg Troy from 2002-13 at the University of Florida, where he attended college and matured to become an Olympian in 2004. Lochte won 11 Olympic medals under Troy and became the world’s best swimmer going into the 2012 Olympics.

In 2013, Lochte moved from Gainesville to Charlotte and trained under David Marsh through the Rio Games. Lochte said last summer that he planned to move to California.

Lochte has also said he plans to try for a fifth Olympics in 2020, but his immediate future is about to get very busy — becoming a father, becoming a husband and the end of his ban.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Phelps on meeting Usain Bolt, swimming with sharks, more

Jesse Owens’ Olympic gold medals up for auction

Jesse Owens
AP
Leave a comment

Two of Jesse Owens‘ four 1936 Berlin Olympic gold medals will be auctioned in August, according to Heritage Auctions.

Owens won four gold medals at the Berlin Games, triumphing in the face of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany by taking the 100m, 200m, 4x100m relay and long jump.

Owens gifted one gold medal to entertainer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, according to “Mr. Bojangles: The Biography of Bill Robinson.”

That medal was auctioned for in 2013 for $1,466,574, the highest price ever for a piece of Olympic memorabilia.

Owens used his three other Olympic golds as payment for a Pittsburgh hotel stay in the mid-1950s, according to “Intelligent Collector,” a magazine affiliated with Heritage Auctions, which is housing the August auction with Owens’ medals.

“Jesse didn’t have the financial means to pay for his stay at Mr. Harry Bailey’s hotel,” said Albert DeVito, son of a local handyman who ended up with the two gold medals being auctioned, according to the magazine. “So he gave his medals to Harry as his payment for expenses incurred.”

DeVito’s father was later gifted the three gold medals by the hotel owner Bailey for previously lending him money. DeVito’s father kept two and gave back to Bailey one gold medal whose whereabouts are unknown, according to the magazine.

DeVito thought to sell the remaining two gold medals after seeing the 2013 auction.

“It wasn’t until that first gold medal sold that we even thought, ‘Oh, my goodness. These things are worth something!'” DeVito said, according to the magazine.

It’s unknown which of the gold medals corresponds to which Olympic event, as they are not specified on the medals.

Before Owens’ death in 1980, the sprinter reportedly said he had lost the four gold medals. The German government replaced them, and they now rest at Ohio State, Owens’ alma mater.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Watch Usain Bolt, Jesse Owens in same race