Lolo Jones

Lolo Jones sheds weight, returns to track at Drake Relays

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Lolo Jones said she’s lost more than 20 pounds in transitioning from bobsled back to track and field on the eve of her first race of the season at the Drake Relays in Des Moines, Iowa.

“The original was to lose 30 plus pounds,” Jones said. “I lost 10 right away. Like within a few weeks, like 10 pounds melted off really quickly. The next 10 were a little bit harder, but just with a stricter diet I was able to get that. The last five to seven have really been tough.”

Jones, 31, is scheduled to compete in a shuttle hurdle relay Friday night at 8, two months after placing 11th in bobsled at the Sochi Olympics.

Jones said she’s at 142 pounds and would like to get to 135 by the U.S. Outdoor Championships in Sacramento, Calif., beginning June 25. Her listed weight on her Sochi 2014 bio page was 161 pounds.

“I’ve been non-stop for the last two years,” she said. “Of all the athletes, track and bobsled, I have not taken really a week off. I really needed to kind of enjoy a chocolate cake every now and then and not be stressed that my career would be over.”

Jones re-enters a crowded U.S. field in the 100m hurdles this season, including reigning world outdoor champion Brianna Rollins, 22, and world indoor champion Nia Ali, 25.

Jones said her first workouts for track after Sochi made it feel like she “hadn’t hurdled in years,” according to the Des Moines Register.

“The first time I went over hurdles, my form was pretty much equivalent to how I ran in high school,” she said, according to the newspaper. “I felt awkward, and I was carrying extra weight, so when I was coming off the hurdles the first day my ankles were killing me just because there was too much weight I was carrying and I was smashing my legs into the track. I was very off balance, so getting that back into coordination was pretty tough.”

Jones also made a bit of news with this tweet Thursday, referencing New York Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda.

Meb Keflezighi cheered by thousands of Bostonians again

WATCH LIVE: Big Air at Fenway — 8:30 p.m. ET

Fenway Big Air
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Fenway Park will host some of the world’s best freeskiers in the one-of-a-kind Big Air at Fenway, live on NBC Sports Live Extra on Friday night.

Big air skiers will descend from a ramp that’s four times higher than the Green Monster inside the hallowed Boston Red Sox home.

Ski big air is most like slopestyle of the current Olympic disciplines, except skiers get one jump per run.

WATCH LIVE: Big Air at Fenway — 8:30 p.m. ET

On Thursday, Canadian Max Parrot and American Julia Marino won the snowboard big air competitions at Fenway Park.

Big Air at Fenway coverage will conclude with an NBC show on Saturday at 5 p.m. ET.

MORE: Olympic champ suffers concussion at Big Air at Fenway practice

Lillehammer Youth Winter Olympics open with homages to 1994

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In an homage to the Lillehammer 1994 Winter Olympics, Princess Ingrid Alexandra of Norway lit the Lillehammer Youth Winter Olympic cauldron to cap the Opening Ceremony on Friday night.

The princess’ father, Crown Prince Haakon, lit the 1994 Olympic cauldron in a very similar fashion (video here). Princess Ingrid Alexandra was born in 2004.

The Opening Ceremony, held outdoors at a ski jump (same venue as 1994) in sub-freezing temperatures, included a speech from International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach.

“I’m just a little bit too old to compete in the YOG,” Bach said, urging listeners to use the hashtag #IloveYOG during the nine-day Winter Games.

The ceremony included Olympic legends, such as 2010 figure skating gold medalist Yuna Kim and eight-time Olympic cross-country champion Bjorn Daehlie carrying the Olympic flag.

Marit Bjoergen, a 10-time Olympic medalist cross-country skier, handed the Olympic flame to the princess.

NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra will air coverage of the Opening Ceremony on Saturday at 12:30 a.m. ET, plus daily coverage throughout the Winter Games. A full broadcast schedule is here.

MORE: Two years to Pyeongchang: Updates on U.S. Olympic medalists from Sochi