Michael Phelps

Michael Phelps beaten by Ryan Lochte in first final of comeback

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Michael Phelps looked pretty fast after taking 20 months off from competition, but he’ll need to work a little harder to beat longtime rival Ryan Lochte. 

Phelps took second to Lochte in his first competitive final since the London Olympics, a 100m butterfly at the Arena Grand Prix at Mesa, Ariz., on Thursday night.

Lochte, whose best strokes are freestyle and backstroke, won in 51.93 seconds. The unretired Phelps clocked 52.13 after swimming the fastest time in the preliminary heats earlier Thursday, 52.84, one tenth faster than Lochte.

The first day of Phelps’ comeback is in the books. How does he feel?

“I’m my hardest critic, so I know what I can do there,” Phelps, a 22-time Olympic medalist, said of the 100m butterfly. “But, like I’ve been saying this whole time, I’m having fun. I really do mean that. There’s nothing like being able to come here, swimming in front of packed stands.”

He cherished racing the 11-time Olympic medalist Lochte, whom he battled after the 2008 Olympics and through the 2012 Olympics to be the world’s best swimmer.

“That’s what makes us swim faster and faster each time,” Phelps said.

NBC Olympics analyst Rowdy Gaines said Phelps appeared to have more of a game face on for the night final than he did for the morning prelim. Phelps and Lochte were side by side at night, both in white caps and dark jammer swim trunks.

“I think I was more calm tonight,” Phelps said. “I don’t know if that was a good thing or not.”

Lochte led at the 50m turn and took a peek at Phelps coming off the wall amid a setting sun outside at Skyline Aquatics Center.

“I almost started smiling,” Lochte said.

“Why, because you were ahead?” responded Phelps, standing next to Lochte in the post-race interview.

Lochte, who is coming back from aggravating a major November knee injury in February, said he felt the magnitude of the meet.

“Especially this morning, seeing all these cameras right before I’m about to race,” Lochte said. “I’m like, thanks, Michael.”

Phelps last swam a 100m butterfly at the 2012 Olympics, where he won his third straight gold in the event in 51.21. The fastest time in the world so far this year is 51.84, according to SwimVortex.com. South African Chad le Clos won the 2013 World Championship in 51.06.

Phelps retired after winning six medals at the London Olympics but re-entered the drug testing pool last year, allowing him to enter meets this year.

It was announced he signed up for the Mesa Grand Prix on April 14, and he made his first comments since entering the meet on Wednesday, saying he’s back swimming “for fun” and not yet committing to a run to the Rio Olympics.

Phelps is slated for one more event in Mesa, the 50m freestyle on Friday.

“Two races down,” Phelps said. “See what happens tomorrow.”

In other races, reigning World Swimmer of the Year Katie Ledecky won the 400m freestyle by nearly five seconds in 4:03.84, matching the fastest time in the world this year. That came about 45 minutes after she finished fourth in the 100m free.

“I train everything,” said Ledecky, who is 17 and the reigning world champion in the 400m free. “The speed can help me for all my race, so it’s really beneficial to swim all these events here.”

Olympic champion Nathan Adrian won the 100m freestyle in 48.23. Lochte was fourth in 49.68.

Five-time 2012 Olympic medalist Allison Schmitt won the women’s 100m free in 54.46. Schmitt, who surprisingly failed to make the 2013 World Championships team, edged Megan Romano (55.05), who anchored that worlds team to victories in the 4x100m free relay and medley relay in Barcelona. Twelve-time Olympic medalist Natalie Coughlin was third in 55.14, followed by Ledecky in 55.22.

Jamaican Olympian Alia Atkinson won the women’s 200m breaststroke in 2:25.52, followed by Americans Micah Lawrence (2:26.60) and Breeja Larson (2:28.87). Lawrence and Larson were the U.S. entries in the 200m breast at last year’s World Championships.

Michael McBroom, the 2013 world 800m free silver medalist, won the men’s 400m free in 3:50.87. Olympian Conor Dwyer was second, three seconds behind. Olympic 200m backstroke champion Tyler Clary was third.

2012 Olympian Claire Donahue won the women’s 100m butterfly in 59.05.

Colombian Jorge Murillo Valdes won the men’s 200m breast in 2:14.81.

Lolo Jones sheds weight, returns to track at Drake Relays

Laurie Hernandez eyes return to competition in 2018

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NEW YORK – Laurie Hernandez hardly considers her 14 months away from competitive gymnastics a break.

Since earning Olympic team gold and balance beam silver in Rio, the 17-year-old won “Dancing with the Stars,” authored a book and even enrolled in ballet lessons.

But her most rewarding experience has been speaking at schools. Students have asked her seemingly every question, from when she started taking gymnastics classes (age 5) to whether she climbed trees when she was younger (yes, all the time).

Seeing how many children were inspired by her Rio performance motivated Hernandez as she prepares to return to the sport.

“I didn’t realize at the Olympics how many people were truly watching,” Hernandez said Wednesday night at the annual Women’s Sports Foundation Salute to Women in Sports. “Now I’m excited to get back into the gym.”

Hernandez recently added handstand holds, back tucks and front flips to her conditioning program, in addition to continuing to run and lift weights.

“It’s a little difficult, but it’s fine,” she said. “I’ll push it a little more after the holidays.”

She has her eye on returning to competition in 2018.

“That’s definitely the hope,” Hernandez said. “I’m not going to rush anything, but I would love to compete in 2018.”

Hernandez, who said her next goal in gymnastics is to compete at the world championships for the first time and hopefully the 2020 Olympics, has not yet identified her comeback meet.

She noted that Aly Raisman took more than two years off after the London Olympics.

“I know every athlete is different,” Hernandez said. “But I wouldn’t mind following in her footsteps.”

Simone Biles, who has not competed since winning four gold medals in Rio, recently announced that she plans on returning to full-time training Nov. 1 and competition next summer.

“I look up to her, even though we are teammates,” Hernandez said. “I can’t wait to see her out there, but hopefully I’ll be out there with her soon.”

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Olympic cycling champion running for Congress

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HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Olympic cycling gold medalist Marty Nothstein is the latest to announce he’s running for the eastern Pennsylvania congressional seat being vacated by fellow Republican U.S. Rep. Charles Dent.

Dent, a former state senator, is a centrist Republican who has held the seat since 2005. He’s retiring after his term expires next year.

Nothstein, who won sprint silver in 1996 and gold in 2000, is the only American track cyclist to win an Olympic title at a fully attended Games.

Two Republican state representatives, Ryan Mackenzie and Justin Simmons, previously announced they’re running for Dent’s 15th District seat.

Democrat Bill Leiner, a former Lehigh County commissioner, is also running.

Dent’s district includes Allentown and all of Lehigh County, and parts of four surrounding counties.

Republicans in 2011 stretched the district almost 90 miles to the Susquehanna River in central Pennsylvania to make it more Republican.

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