Johnny Weir, Tara Lipinski

Johnny Weir, Tara Lipinski ready to provide ‘cultural look’ inside Kentucky Derby

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Johnny Weir‘s theme for his Kentucky Derby hat is Pegasus.

Weir and Sochi figure skating cohort Tara Lipinski have done their homework for their next assignment — fashion experts for this weekend at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. Weir called it Kentucky’s version of New York’s Fashion Week.

“Tara and I will be providing sort of a cultural look inside the Kentucky Derby,” Weir said in a teleconference Tuesday. “There is something so lovely about Southern charm and sweet tea and fried green tomatoes and every movie we see with the debutantes and the huge dresses.”

Weir said their work will include pre-filmed spots for Saturday’s coverage (12-4 p.m. ET on NBCSN, 4-7 on NBC) as well as giving updates during the show and any necessary post-event follow-ups. NBCSN also has Kentucky Oaks coverage Friday from 3-6.

Weir and Lipinski both rode horses growing up in Pennsylvania and Texas, respectively. But they will bring a different flavor to the Run for the Roses.

“Like, ‘Oh, we saw Jay Z and Beyoncé sitting over there, and we sat on their laps and we sang to them and we enjoyed it,'” Weir offered as an example.

The retired skaters are working together for at least the third time since Sochi. They also covered the Academy Awards and the Best of U.S. Awards.

“We love working together and sharing our own special bit of moxie and sparkle with the world,” Weir said. “I personally would never tire of my little blond munchkin.”

They will be respectful of Derby fashion, even if it doesn’t always agree with their differing tastes. Lipinski said there won’t be a fashion police element to it.

“I’m sure we’ll have some distinct and very outspoken moments,” the 1998 Olympic champion said. “But at the same time, I don’t think it’s going to be catty.”

Weir said “a little birdie” gave him advice on which horse to pick — Danza, the Arkansas Derby winner named after the “Who’s the Boss?” star. Lipinski planned to have girlfriends over Tuesday to learn about the horses, after she spent the afternoon “in a sea of hats” getting fitted.

It will be Lipinski’s first Kentucky Derby and Weir’s second. Weir also went in 2010 and has learned from the experience, when he dressed for a slight chill and ended up sweating while meeting Tom BradyJerry O’Connell and Rebecca Romijn.

“It was not cute,” Weir said.

Weir is taking no chances on his return trip, consulting on hat selection with A-Morir’s Kerin Rose Gold, who he said also created fashion items for RihannaLady Gaga and Katy Perry.

“I obviously needed a custom hat, because I’m me,” Weir said. “My theme for the hat for the Derby day is Pegasus.

“I like to wear craziness at all costs, because that’s my personality. I’m definitely going to bring myself to Kentucky, but I wanted a little bit of tradition to what I’m wearing.”

Weir, who began riding English saddle when he was about 8, said he was on the fast track to becoming something in show jumping before focusing on figure skating.

“Who knows, maybe I’ll compete in the Summer Olympics for equestrian one day,” Weir joked.

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Tommie Smith, John Carlos set to join Team USA at White House

FILe - In this Oct. 16, 1968, file photo, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward while extending gloved hands skyward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left. Smith and Carlos, the American sprinters whose raised-fist salutes at the 1968 Olympics are an ageless sign of race-inspired protest, will join the U.S. Olympic team at the White House next week for its meeting with President Barack Obama. Smith and Carlos were sent home from the Olympics after raising their black-gloved fists in a symbolic protest during the U.S. national anthem. They called it a ``human rights salute.''
The USOC asked them to serve as ambassadors as it tries to make its own leadership more diverse. (AP Photo/File)
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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Tommie Smith and John Carlos, the American sprinters whose raised-fist salutes at the 1968 Olympics are an ageless sign of race-inspired protest, will join the U.S. Olympic team at the White House next week for its meeting with President Barack Obama.

Smith and Carlos were sent home from the Olympics after raising their black-gloved fists in a symbolic protest during the U.S. national anthem. They called it a “human rights salute.”

USOC CEO Scott Blackmun asked them to serve as ambassadors as the federation tries to bring more diversity to its own ranks. They will join the team at the White House next Wednesday, then later that evening at an awards celebration in Washington.

The sprinters have been referenced frequently in the recent protests, spurred by Colin Kaepernick, during national anthems at NFL games. One player, Marcus Peters of the Chiefs, raised his own black-gloved fist before Kansas City’s season opener.

“I think Tommie and John have played an important and positive role in the evolution of our attitudes about diversity and inclusion, not only in the United States but around the world,” Blackmun said Friday night at a dinner to celebrate the U.S. performance in Brazil this summer.

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Wilson Kipsang: I am very focused on the marathon world record

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The men’s marathon world record has been broken five of the last nine years at the Berlin Marathon.

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang, who broke the world record at the 2013 Berlin Marathon, believes that he can do it again on Sunday, when the race will stream live on the NBC Sports app beginning at 2:30 a.m. ET.

“I’ve trained well and, three years down the line from my world record here, I feel good and believe I have the potential to attempt the world record once more,” he said at today’s press conference, according to the IAAF. “Running at the top level, there is a lot of wear and tear on the body, especially when you are running for a time, but I am very focused on the world record.”

Kipsang clocked 2 hours, 3 minutes, 23 seconds when he broke the world record in 2013. A year later, fellow Kenyan Dennis Kimetto lowered it to 2:02:57 on the same course. Kimetto will not race in Berlin this year.

Kipsang will be challenged by Kenyan compatriot Emmanuel Mutai, who has the fastest time (2:03:13) in the field, and Ethiopia’s Kenenisa Bekele.

Bekele is a three-time Olympic track champion and the 5000m and 10,000m world-record holder, but acknowledged that his marathon personal best of 2:05:04 places him a distant fourth in the field.

“I consider my personal best of 2:05 to be slow compared to the best runners,” he said. “I want to run as fast as I can on Sunday and beat my best.”

MORE: Berlin Marathon to live stream on NBC Sports app