Justin Gatlin

Justin Gatlin wins in Kingston; Merritt, Richards-Ross beaten

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Justin Gatlin won his first 100m of the season in 10.11 seconds at the Jamaica International Invitational in Kingston on Saturday night.

Gatlin, 32, edged Jamaicans Andrew Fisher (10.21) and Nesta Carter (10.22) running into a headwind, according to TV announcers. Gatlin and Carter won silver and bronze behind Usain Bolt in the 2013 World Championships 100m. Bolt might not make his season debut until June.

“I knew to get ready for that wind in my face, so to drive hard, once I came up, just attack,” said Gatlin, who said he ran competitively in Jamaica for the first time in his career. “I think I’m a bridge for the gap of the generations. I dueled with Maurice Greene. I watched Michael Johnson run. I ran with the great Usain Bolt. Also, [Yohan] Blake. So I’m just very blessed to be here with the best crowd in the whole world.”

Jamaican Olympic and world 200m medalist Warren Weir was fourth in 10.30. American Walter Dix, won won sprint medals at the 2008 Olympics and 2011 World Championships, was seventh in 10.45.

Triple 2013 world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won the women’s 200m in 22.53, .08 better than U.S. champion Kimberlyn DuncanJeneba Tarmoh was third in 22.69.

“Tonight was all about seeing where I am and looking forward to the rest of the season,” said Fraser-Pryce, who was .26 off the world-leading time for 2014.

Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare, an Olympic and world long jump medalist, won the women’s 100m in 11.19. 2008 Olympic silver medalist Kerron Stewart took second in 11.32. U.S. champion English Gardner was seventh in 11.50.

Olympic champions Sanya Richards-Ross and LaShawn Merritt were beaten in their 400m races. Richards-Ross, plagued by toe problems since the London Games, was fifth in 51.62. World indoor champion Francena McCorory prevailed in a world-leading 50.24.

Merritt was beaten at the lean by 2012 Olympic silver medalist Luguelin Santos of the Dominican Republic, 44.82 to 44.86.

“No disappointment,” Merritt said. “I’m a champion.

“I think I ran a little bit too conservative throughout the first part of the race. Then I just kind of ran to get tired.”

Two-time Olympic 400m hurdles champion Felix Sanchez passed 2013 world champion Jehue Gordon after the final hurdle to win in 49.21. Gordon, who at 22 is 14 years younger than Sanchez, came in second in 49.32.

“I’m an old man,” said Sanchez, who slapped his chest before crossing the finish line, “but I’ve still got something left.”

2008 Olympic silver medalist Christian Cantwell won the shot put with a throw of 21.85m, a 2014 world lead and a distance that would have won the 2013 World Championship. Cantwell missed much of last season due to injury.

2012 Olympic bronze medalist Hansle Parchment won the 110m hurdles in 13.42 seconds in front of a home crowd, edging American world silver medalist Ryan Wilson by .03. World Championships bronze medalist Tiffany Porter of Great Britain took the women’s 100m hurdles in 12.92, one day after Lolo Jones ran a reported 12.89 in Bloomington, Ind.

American Curtis Mitchell, the world 200m bronze medalist, came in second in the 200m behind Jamaican Rasheed Dwyer, 20.53 to 20.54.

The meet lost two Olympic gold medalists earlier this week with the withdrawal of 2008 Olympic 400m champion Christine Ohuruogu and 2012 Olympic 200m champion Allyson Felix. Felix missed the meet due to a reported injury and was scheduled to next race at the Cayman Invitational on Wednesday.

Tyson Gay: ‘There’s a lot for me to tell’

IIHF president doesn’t expect NHL participation in 2018 Olympics

Sidney Crosby
Getty Images
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SOCHI, Russia (AP) — The head of ice hockey’s international body says there is a strong possibility that NHL players won’t be competing at the next Winter Olympics.

International Ice Hockey Federation president Rene Fasel puts the chances at 60 percent that the NHL will decline to go to the 2018 Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, because of a lack of money to cover player insurance.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Fasel said the IOC has canceled its contribution to player travel and insurance costs for Pyeongchang, leaving the IIHF facing a $10 million shortfall and “begging” for money around the world.

“It’s always difficult to get (to) the Olympics, the Games,” he said. “And now with some problems on our side, 50-50 is very positive. I would be more 60 percent that they are not coming.”

Negotiations and brinkmanship over finances are common in the lead-up to Olympic hockey tournaments. For the 2014 tournament in Sochi, Russia, the NHL’s participation was assured only in July 2013, seven months before the Games.

The IOC’s refusal to cover player insurance adds an additional dimension for 2018.

The NHL did not immediately respond to a request for comment Tuesday, but Commissioner Gary Bettman has made it clear costs are a key factor.

“There are real costs to us going, including insurance, including transportation because we’re losing part of our season, we’ve got to get in and out quickly,” Bettman said last month at a meeting of the Associated Press Sports Editors in New York. “The players for the last five Olympics in particular have been accommodated in a certain way as far as it relates to their families. Those are issues that would once again have to be resolved. … I’m not sure that there would be a lot of appetite for us on top of that to have to pay for the privilege. We don’t make money going to then Olympics.”

Bettman said he didn’t expect a decision until after the World Cup of Hockey in Toronto in September.

While the IOC gives the IIHF around $40 million of revenue each Olympics, Fasel insists that money is earmarked for developing hockey and wants national Olympic committees and hockey federations to plug the gap.

The IOC pulled its extra subsidy because its leaders are “a bit scared that other (sports) federations will come and also ask for some compensation for traveling and insurance,” said Fasel, who is also an IOC member and serves on its rule-making executive board.

“I think my idea is to work closer together with the national Olympic committees, as they have normally to pay transportation and insurance for the athletes when they come to the Games, so I can imagine that some of the NOCs are also ready to spend some money there, so we have to go around and do some begging,” he said.

Fasel said the end of this year is the deadline to reach a deal because of the NHL’s need to draw up a calendar for the Olympic season.

“If you don’t have the best, (the Olympics) will be a different competition for sure,” he said, but warned: “At the end somebody has to pay. That’s the question. On my side I will do everything possible to make it happen.”

Fasel dismissed the suggestion that the World Cup of Hockey could offer some players less incentive to demand to be allowed to play at the Olympics.

“There is nothing like the Olympics,” he said. “I think for an athlete to win the gold medal is so different from winning the Stanley Cup. You can win the Stanley Cup every year.”

In Pyeongchang in 2018 and Beijing in 2022, the Winter Olympics move to Asia and away from the North American and European nations that have historically been the bedrock of hockey.

South Korea, which has built a team mixing import players with locals, plays in the second level of the IIHF’s world championship and hopes not to be a walkover in 2018. China is far less competitive. China will be in the fifth tier for next year and in 2022 could become the first Winter Olympic host not to enter a hockey team — a situation that worries the IIHF, given China’s potential to become a huge market for the sport.

“One thing they do not like is to lose the face, so they cannot do that,” Fasel said. “I hope and I think they will have a Chinese player, Chinese team in Beijing in 2022. We cannot put them on the ice and they will be beaten 15, 20-nothing. We cannot do that.”

Things are looking up for China, with increased government interest and the Russia-based Kontinental Hockey League due to open a team there this year, but Fasel said the NHL is key to unlocking potentially vast commercial rewards in China.

“A North American brand in China has a very special taste. We can see that with the NBA,” he said. “I think what we need is to have a Chinese NHL player, like Yao Ming with basketball.”

MORE: 2018 Olympic men’s hockey groups determined

Golf Channel unveils Rio Olympic broadcast schedule

Rio 2016
NBC
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Golf Channel will air more than 130 live hours and nearly 300 total hours of Olympic programming for the sport’s return to the Games in Rio in August.

The first Olympic golf tournaments in 112 years start Aug. 11 (men) and Aug. 17 (women), but Golf Channel coverage will begin Aug. 8 with Golf Central’s “Live From the Olympics.”

Competition coverage will run from the opening tee shot to the final putt and medal ceremonies.

NBC’s Olympic coverage will also include live look-ins, highlights and updates from the golf competition throughout the Games.

The Olympic men’s and women’s golf tournaments are each four-round, stroke-play individual events with 60 golfers in each field determined by world rankings on July 11.

The top 15 in the world rankings will qualify, with no more than four golfers per nation per gender. Then the fields are filled with no more than two golfers per nation past the top 15 until the 60 mark is met.

MORE: USA Golf unveils Olympic uniforms

Golf Channel Live Schedule

Date Event Time (ET)
Monday, Aug. 8 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 6-8 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 9 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 6-8 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 10 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 6-8 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 11 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6:30 a.m.
MEN ROUND 1 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 12 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6:30 a.m.
MEN ROUND 2 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 13 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6:30 a.m.
MEN ROUND 3 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 14 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6 a.m.
MEN FINAL ROUND 6 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 15 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 6-8 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 16 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 6-8 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 17 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6:30 a.m.
WOMEN ROUND 1 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 18 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6:30 a.m.
WOMEN ROUND 2 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 19 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6 a.m.
WOMEN ROUND 3 6 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 20 Golf Central Live From the Olympics 5-6 a.m.
WOMEN FINAL ROUND 6 a.m.-3 p.m.
Golf Central Live From the Olympics 3-5 p.m.