Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius was ‘heartbroken,’ ‘traumatized,’ says social worker

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Oscar Pistorius appeared heartbroken and traumatized one day after he killed girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, a social worker and probation officer testified at the runner’s murder trial Thursday.

The defense called Yvette van Schalkwyk as one of three witnesses to testify on the 28th day of the trial in Pretoria, South Africa. Van Schalkwyk provided daily emotional support to Pistorius after he fatally shot Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day 2013. She said he cried 80 percent of the time.

“What I saw from the first time that I saw him, from the first second, was a man that was heartbroken about the loss,” van Schalkwyk said. “He was in mourning. He suffered emotionally. He was very sorry about the loss, especially for her parents. … That was the theme throughout the whole period that I saw him.”

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, said he thought an intruder was locked inside his bathroom when he shot four times through a locked door, hitting and killing Steenkamp inside.

He faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder. If not found guilty of premeditated murder, Pistorius could be convicted of culpable homicide, South Africa’s version of manslaughter for negligent killing.

Van Schalkwyk sat with Pistorius in his prison cell during his bail application last year. The runner cried and vomitted twice, she said.

“He missed Reeva so much,” van Schalkwyk said. “That was his words, the first words he said to me.”

In court, van Schalkwyk read from weekly progress reports on Pistorius’ mental state from March 2013, from when he was seeing a psychologist for “intense therapy,” she said, adding that Pistorius held a small memorial service for Steenkamp while staying at his uncle’s house, which left him emotionally drained.

“The accused is very heartbroken,” she read from the first of four weekly reports. “He still has a lot of emotion and stress.”

Van Schalkwyk said she contacted Pistorius’ defense team on Tuesday telling them she was willing to testify. She was motivated by reports that Pistorius’ emotional responses in court — including sobbing and vomitting — were an act.

Earlier Thursday, anesthetist Prof. Aina Christina Lundgren testified that Steenkamp’s stomach should have been empty when she died if she had not eaten in at least six hours before the shooting. Pistorius believes Steenkamp had not eaten within eight hours of the shooting. An autopsy report said she still had food in her stomach. However, the anesthetist said it was an inexact science and speculative to judge.

The final witness Thursday was ballistics expert Wollie Wolmarans, who investigated the scene at Pistorius’ house beginning three days after the shooting. Wolmarans testified about Pistorius’ firearm, ammunition, bullet trajectory and Steenkamp’s wounds. He at one point asked the court if anybody had a firearm he could borrow to show how it worked, but nobody offered one.

The trial is scheduled to resume at 3:30 a.m. ET on Friday. The defense is expected to wrap its case by Tuesday.

Here’s NBC News’ full coverage of the trial.

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U.S. women’s gymnastics World Championships team analysis

Gabby Douglas, Simone Biles
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The U.S. women’s gymnastics team that will try to win a fourth straight global title at the World Championships in three weeks in Glasgow, Scotland, is arguably the most accomplished in American history.

It’s the first time a U.S. men’s or women’s team for Worlds has included two past Olympic or World all-around champions — Simone Biles and Gabby Douglas.

It’s the first time a U.S. men’s or women’s team for Worlds has included any past individual Olympic champions — Douglas and Aly Raisman.

Biles, Douglas and Raisman were three of the seven women named to the team by USA Gymnastics following selection camp competition in Texas on Thursday night.

The others are 2014 World Championships team members MyKayla Skinner and Madison Kocian; Brenna Dowell, who traveled to the 2013 Worlds but didn’t compete, and Worlds rookie Maggie Nichols.

One of the seven women must be designated an alternate before Worlds, as nations can use a maximum of six in competition in Glasgow.

The team includes zero women under the age of 18, a first in U.S. gymnastics World Championships history. That hasn’t happened at the Olympics since 1952, according to sports-reference.com.

The U.S. roster is without Olympic team champions McKayla Maroney, who hasn’t competed since the 2013 Worlds, and Kyla Ross, who announced her withdrawal from Worlds team selection on Oct. 1 without citing a reason. The other member of the 2012 U.S. Olympic team, Jordyn Wieber, is retired.

At Worlds, the U.S.’ biggest competition will likely come from the other three women’s gymnastics powers — China, Romania and Russia. Russia’s early roster includes three members of its five-woman 2012 Olympic silver medal-winning team, including Viktoria Komova, the Olympic all-around silver medalist.

An interesting competition within the U.S. team could be which two women advance from Oct. 24 qualifying into the Worlds individual all-around final Oct. 29. If more than two U.S. women compete on all four events in qualifying, then the two with the highest overall scores advance to the all-around final.

MORE GYMNASTICS: A look at recent Olympians’ comebacks

Here’s a look at the U.S. team and each gymnast’s credentials:

Simone Biles: The two-time reigning World all-around champion and three-time reigning U.S. champion. The 18-year-old Texan could become the first woman to win three straight World all-around titles. She could also break Alicia Sacramone‘s U.S. record for career Worlds medals. Sacramone earned 10 medals over five Worlds. Biles has nine in her first two, after bagging a U.S. women’s record five medals at a single Worlds in 2014. Biles has won nine straight all-around competitions, with her last defeat coming March 30, 2013.

Gabby Douglas: The Olympic all-around champion will compete at Worlds for the first time since her 2011 debut. She took 31 months off from competition after London 2012, returning in March. She’s finished fourth, second and fifth in three all-around competitions this year, with Biles winning all of those titles.

Aly Raisman: The Olympic floor exercise champion is also at Worlds for the first time since 2011 after taking a 31-month break following London 2012. She’s finished third, fifth and third in three all-arounds this year, all won by Biles. Raisman earned the P&G Championships floor exercise title in August over Biles, the two-time reigning World champion in the event.

Maggie Nichols: The Little Canada, Minn., native whose Twitter handle is @MagsGotSwag12, finished second in the P&G Championships all-around, behind Biles and ahead of Raisman and Douglas. She was third at the 2014 P&G Championships and looked destined for her first Worlds team then until dislocating her left kneecap the following week.

Madison Kocian: She’s the P&G champion on uneven bars, the only apparatus for which she was used in the 2014 World Championships team final. The last American to win an Olympic or Worlds uneven bars title was Nastia Liukin in 2005.

Brenna Dowell: She made the 2013 Worlds team and traveled to Antwerp, Belgium, but was designated the alternate with Biles, Ross and Maroney competing in the all-around in qualifying. At that Worlds (but not this one), a maximum of three women per country could compete per apparatus. She was also an alternate for the 2014 Worlds team and is strongest on uneven bars and floor exercise. Dowell, who is taking a year off from competing for Oklahoma University, is the first U.S. women’s gymnast with NCAA experience to make an Olympic or Worlds team since Sacramone in 2011.

MyKayla Skinner: Skinner finished third on vault and fourth on floor exercise at the 2014 Worlds and then second to Biles in the all-around at the American Cup on March 7. She was second on vault and third on floor at the P&G Championships in August.

MORE GYMNASTICS: Analyzing U.S. men’s World Championships team

Rio Olympic equestrian may be moved outside Brazil

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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The head of the Brazilian Equestrian Confederation has warned that equestrian events at next year’s Rio de Janeiro Olympics might have to take place outside Brazil.

Luiz Roberto Giugni blasted the country’s Agriculture Ministry for delays in issuing documentation needed to allow horses brought into Brazil from Europe, the United States and Canada to leave the country.

He warned that if the ministry doesn’t act before the end of the month, “we run the risk of not having the event in Brazil.”

Regulations for bringing horses to and from Brazil are strict. The country is still subject to diseases affecting horses, including glanders, a lethal bacterial infection recently diagnosed in several horses here.

Guigni was speaking on Wednesday at an event in Sao Paulo.