Oscar Pistorius

Prosecutor wants Oscar Pistorius under mental observation

1 Comment

The lead prosecutor said he is applying to have Oscar Pistorius held for mental observation after a forensic psychiatrist testified the runner had an anxiety disorder at his murder trial Monday.

Pistorius has generalized anxiety disorder and is on depression treatment, said psychiatrist Dr. Merryll Vorster, who visited the runner twice this month. Vorster said the condition may have affected how Pistorius reacted to the situation when he fatally shot girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day 2013, but he still was able to distinguish right from wrong.

Lead prosecutor Gerrie Nel said Vorster’s testimony justified an application to refer Pistorius for mental observation.

“I’m bringing that application based on this witness’ evidence,” Nel said. “This court will not have an option but to refer Mr. Pistorius for mental observation.”

Pistorius’ lead defense attorney, Barry Roux, argued against the application because Pistorius could still distinguish right from wrong and was not delusional.

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, said he thought an intruder was locked inside his bathroom when he shot four times through a locked door, hitting and killing Steenkamp inside last year.

He faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder. If not found guilty of premeditated murder, Pistorius, 27, could be convicted of culpable homicide, South Africa’s version of manslaughter for negligent killing.

On Monday, the trial’s 30th day, Vorster said Pistorius’ anxiety and stress developed over time, from when his legs were amputated below the knee at 11 months old to his parents’ divorce at age 6, his mother’s death at age 15, breaking ties with his father at 21 and the increasing demands of being a famous professional athlete.

Vorster said Pistorius was raised to believe his external environment was threatening and became hypervigilant. His mother slept with a firearm under her pillow.

“As one is increasingly anxious, one feels more and more insecure about one’s personal safety, even though factually one’s safety may not be threatened,” Vorster said. “You perceive your surroundings as being threatening when maybe they aren’t.

“He was aware that he was a public figure, and believed that this made him at an increased risk of being attacked or burgled.”

Pistorius felt isolated and alone and tried to combat those feelings by inviting friends to sleep over, but he was still distrustful and guarded, the psychiatrist said.

Pistorius’ anxiety disorder and physical vulnerability go hand in hand, possibly affecting how he reacted when he fatally shot Steenkamp thinking she was an intruder, Vorster said.

“He would have been more likely to fight as his capacity to flight was compromised,” by not having his legs, she said. “I’m not saying this constitutes a mental illness.”

She said Pistorius’ anxiety disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis rather than a mental disorder but said there was “no harm” in Nel’s suggestion Pistorius be referred for mental observation.

The trial is scheduled to resume at 3:30 a.m. ET on Tuesday.

Here’s NBC News’ full coverage of the trial.

Mo Farah on Oregon Project allegations: ‘I’m sick of it’

Getty Images
Leave a comment

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — As he prepares for what could be his final track race on U.S. soil, Mo Farah remains dogged by doping allegations surrounding his team.

The British Olympian will race the 5000m Saturday at the Prefontaine Classic, the only U.S. stop in the elite Diamond League series (NBC, NBC Sports Gold from 4-6 p.m. ET).

Farah has said that 2017 will be his last year on the track, with an eye on the world championships in London this August. The 34-year-old plans to transition after that to marathons.

Farah defended his 5000m and 10,000m titles at the Rio Olympics last August, becoming the first British track and field athlete to win four Olympic gold medals. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth last December.

But at a news conference for the Prefontaine, Farah faced questions about allegations that paint his team, Nike’s Oregon Project, in a bad light.

Details have emerged from a 2016 report prepared by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on practices by the team, led by decorated U.S. marathoner Alberto Salazar. Allegations have also surfaced recently based on information obtained by the hacking group known as Fancy Bears.

“I just get sick of it, really, to be honest with you,” Farah said. “As an athlete you just want to do the best as you can, and that’s what I want to do. But it’s nothing new. It’s something the press likes to be able to twist it and add a little bit of spices and add stuff on it. Being an Olympic champion, four-time Olympic champion, you do get a lot of that stuff. But at the same time you just have to do the best that you can. I believe in clean sports.”

He said he has not read the USADA report that has shown up online.

“It’s nothing new. You tell me something new. Since 2011 it’s the same stuff,” Farah said, clearly exasperated. “It’s all right. That’s what you get being an Olympic champion, and what we do.”

Farah has been training for the past five months in Flagstaff, Ariz., for the outdoor season and his final bow at the worlds. He hopes to run both of his signature races, the 5000m and 10,000m, if his body lets him, he said.

Saturday’s Prefontaine will be bittersweet.

“I don’t like to think like that, but it will be, my last,” he said. “It will probably be very emotional knowing that will be my last track racing in the U.S. But you know, tomorrow (I) just can’t be worrying about anything. I just have to concentrate on the race and getting the job done.”

Farah will be part of a stellar field that includes Paul Chelimo, the 5000m silver medalist in Rio, and Kenyan Paul Tanui, the Rio silver medalist in the 10,000m.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

VIDEO: Runner clocks No. 2 time ever … after stopping to fix shoe

Gabriele Grunewald races at Pre Classic with 13-inch reminder of cancer

Leave a comment

Delaying chemotherapy, American Gabriele Grunewald finished ninth in the 1500m at the Pre Classic on Friday night.

“I’m a professional runner and four-time cancer survivor,” Grunewald told Lewis Johnson on NBCSN. “I’m still in the fight. I have treatment ahead of me this summer. I’m really just trying to hold onto running because it’s gotten me through so much.”

Grunewald just missed making the 2012 Olympic team, finishing fourth in the 1500m at the Trials, where the top three earned London berths.

That came three years after she was diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare cancer.

Last August, Grunewald had surgery to remove cancer from her liver, which left a 13-inch scar across her stomach visible during Friday’s race.

The cancer resurfaced again in March. She’s putting off chemotherapy until later this summer in a quest to qualify for and race at the U.S. Championships in June.

Grunewald needs to clock 4:09.50 by June 18 for direct entry into the U.S. Championships. Her best time so far this season is 4:12.29, but Grunewald ran 4:01.48 back in 2013.

Her time Friday was 4:15.04.

“Lots of rare cancers out there that don’t have cures. Mine’s of them,” Grunewald said. “So I’m just hoping I can find a treatment that will help me out.”

Full Pre Classic results are here.

Pre Classic coverage continues Saturday on NBC and streaming on NBC Sports Gold from 4-6 p.m. ET.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

VIDEO: Runner clocks No. 2 time ever … after stopping to fix shoe