Oscar Pistorius

Judge to rule whether Oscar Pistorius sent for mental observation

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The judge in Oscar Pistorius‘ murder trial will rule Wednesday if the runner will be placed under psychiatric evaluation, a decision that could delay the trial significantly.

Prosecutor Gerrie Nel formally requested Pistorius be placed under mental observation Tuesday, one day after a forensic psychiatrist testified that Pistorius had an anxiety disorder that may have impacted his fatal shooting of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day 2013.

If Judge Thokozile Masipa grants the request, the evaluation period could last 30 days, according to reports.

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, said he thought an intruder was locked inside his bathroom when he shot four times through a locked door, hitting and killing Steenkamp inside.

He faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder. If not found guilty of premeditated murder, Pistorius could be convicted of culpable homicide, South Africa’s version of manslaughter for negligent killing.

The psychiatrist, Dr. Merryll Vorster, continued to answer questions Tuesday. She said a person with Pistorius’ anxiety disorder probably shouldn’t own guns but may be more likely to purchase them for protection.

Nel made his request that Pistorius be placed under evaluation after Vorster’s testimony. He and lead defense attorney Barry Roux argued for more than an hour over the application. Roux said Pistorius should not be placed under mental observation and that he planned to call another witness to testify about Pistorius’ mental state.

Nel questioned the timing of Vorster being called, so late in the defense’s order of witnesses. He suggested she was called because Pistorius “was not the most impressive witness” when he testified in his own defense one month ago. Vorster said she visited Pistorius twice, both times earlier this month.

The trial is scheduled to resume at 3:30 a.m. ET on Wednesday.

Here’s NBC News’ full coverage of the trial.

IOC will not enforce complete ban on Russia for Rio Olympics

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 27:  Maria Sharapova of the Russia Olympic tennis team carries her country's flag during the Opening Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium on July 27, 2012 in London, England.  (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Olympic leaders stopped short Sunday of imposing a complete ban on Russia from the Rio de Janeiro Games, assigning individual global sports federations the responsibility to decide which athletes should be cleared to compete.

The decision, announced after a three-hour meeting via teleconference of the International Olympic Committee’s executive board, came just 12 days before the Aug. 5 opening of the games.

“We had to balance the collective responsibility and the individual justice to which every human being and athlete is entitled to,” IOC President Thomas Bach said.

The IOC rejected calls from the World Anti-Doping Agency and dozens of other anti-doping bodies to exclude the entire Russian Olympic team following allegations of state-sponsored cheating.

Russia’s track and field athletes have already been banned by the IAAF, the sport’s governing body, a decision that was upheld Thursday by the Court of Arbitration for Sport, and was accepted by the IOC again on Sunday.

Calls for a complete ban on Russia intensified after Richard McLaren, a Canadian lawyer commissioned by WADA, issued a report Monday accusing Russia’s sports ministry of overseeing a vast doping program of its Olympic athletes.

McLaren’s investigation, based heavily on evidence from former Moscow doping lab director Grigory Rodchenkov, affirmed allegations of brazen manipulation of Russian urine samples at the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, but also found that state-backed doping had involved 28 summer and winter sports from 2011 to 2015.

But the IOC board decided against the ultimate sanction, in line with Bach’s recent statements stressing the need to take individual justice into account. The IOC said the McLaren report had made no direct accusations against the Russian Olympic Committee “as an institution.”

“An athlete should not suffer and should not be sanctioned for a system in which he was not implicated,” Bach told reporters on a conference call after Sunday’s meeting.

The IOC also said Russia is barred from entering for the Rio Games any athlete who has ever been sanctioned for doping, while international federations will also analyze an athlete’s testing history.

In a statement, the IOC said it would accept the entry of only those Russian athletes who meet certain conditions set out for the 28 international federations to apply.

Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko says that “the majority” of Russia’s team complies with IOC criteria on doping and will be able to compete in Rio.

The criteria are “very tough, but that’s a kind of challenge for our team… I’m sure the majority of our team will comply,” Mutko said.

Around “80 percent” of the Russian team regularly undergoes international testing of the kind specified in the IOC criteria, he adds.

Mutko says he accepts the criteria but adds it is not fair that former dopers from other countries can compete.

The IOC also rejected the application by Russian whistleblower Yulia Stepanova, the 800-meter runner and former doper who helped expose the doping scandal in her homeland, to compete under a neutral flag at the games. However, the IOC added that it would invite her and her husband, Vitaly Stepanov, to attend the games.

MORE: Russia loses Olympic track and field ban appeal

Leaks, electrical outages found in Rio Olympic athletes village

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JUNE 23:  Preparations continue at the Olympic Athlete Village for the 2016 Rio Olympic Games as seen during a media tour of the venue on June 23, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Thousands of athletes arriving for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics could find major plumbing and electrical problems in their rooms at the Athletes Village with the games opening in just under two weeks.

The International Olympic Committee and local organizers held emergency talks Sunday just hours before the sprawling Athletes Village was set to open officially. The 31-building village will house 18,000 athletes and officials at the height of the games.

This is the latest problem to hit the troubled games.

In a statement Sunday, the Australian Olympic Committee says it will not permit any of its athletes to move into their rooms.

Australian Olympic Committee spokesman Mike Tancred says the building for his team has “leaking pipes, water leaking from the ceiling. We’ve got electrical problems. We’ve got cleaning problems.”

MORE: Ready or Not: Rio Olympics open doors at Athletes Village