Tyson Gay

Former coach sues Tyson Gay over doping case

1 Comment

Tyson Gay‘s former coach is suing the sprinter and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency “for falsely accusing him of administering and providing performance-enhancing drugs” to Gay, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Jon Drummond, who coached Gay as recently as 2012, filed a lawsuit against Gay and USADA CEO Travis Tygart in a Texas county civil court Wednesday, according to the report, and said USADA notified him a month ago that it intended to seek a lifetime ban against him.

Gay tested positive three times in 2013 for “an exogenous androgenic anabolic steroid and/or its metabolites,” according to USADA, which suspended the sprinter for one year. Gay was given a reduced suspension for “providing substantial assistance” to USADA. The World Anti-Doping Agency Code notes that “substantial assistance” includes fully disclosing all information an athlete possesses in relation to the doping violation and implicating other individuals.

Those drug tests came several months after Drummond stopped working with Gay. Drummond told Sports Illustrated last year that he had not worked with Gay since September 2012.

Drummond said in the lawsuit that Gay never tested positive while Drummond was his coach, according to the Star-Telegram.

“He was absolutely stunned when rumors began to arise that either Mr. Gay himself or others intended to blame this positive test on Mr. Drummond,” the lawsuit stated.

The USADA report stated that Gay first used a product that contained a prohibited substance on July 15, 2012.

Sports Illustrated reported last year that Drummond knew an anti-aging doctor, Clayton Gibson, who started working with Gay before the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials, which ran from June 21-July 1, 2012.

Gibson said that Gay had been referred to him by former U.S. sprinter Jon Drummond, who once coached Gay and was the Team USA relay coach at the 2012 Olympics. Gay was a member of the 4×100-meter relay team in London. Drummond denied in a text message to SI that he referred Gay to Gibson, but said he met the doctor with Gay last year. “I had heard good reports about [Gibson] from various athletes, so I hoped to engage in some due diligence with respect to his practice, just as I have done with many medical providers over the years … I did not recommend that Tyson enter a relationship with him, long-term or otherwise. I have not worked with Tyson since September 2012 and have no knowledge as to what relationships he may have entered during that period.”

Gay and the U.S. 4x100m relay team won silver at the London Olympics, but Gay lost all of his results since July 15, 2012, with the suspension and returned his Olympic medal.

ProPublica reported more about Drummond, Gibson and Gay after the suspension came down, saying that Drummond “discussed [Gibson] with Gay.”

People with knowledge of USADA’s ongoing investigation have told ProPublica that the sprinter tested positive for a steroid or steroid precursor believed to have come from a cream given to him by Atlanta chiropractor and anti-aging specialist Clayton Gibson III. …

Drummond vehemently denied being aware of any creams that Gay was using that might contain banned substances.

People with knowledge of USADA’s investigation said the agency has been told that Drummond had carried the cream for Gay during a training camp in Monaco prior to the 2012 Olympics.

Drummond, 45, won Olympic silver and gold medals in 1996 and 2000 as part of the U.S. Olympic 4x100m relay teams.

Justin Gatlin runs fastest 100m of 2014 in Beijing

WADA investigates report that 10,000 Chinese athletes doped

AP
Leave a comment

BERLIN (AP) — The World Anti-Doping Agency is looking into allegations made by a German broadcaster that Chinese athletes benefited from systematic doping in the 1980s and 90s.

“The allegations were brought forward by former Chinese physician, Xue Yinxian, who is said to have looked after several national teams in China during the decades in question,” WADA said Monday.

Xue, who recently arrived in Germany and is seeking political asylum with her son, told broadcaster ARD that more than 10,000 athletes were affected, some as young as 11, and that anyone who was against doping was considered “a danger to the country. And anyone who endangered the country is now in prison.”

The 79-year-old Xue said she lost her job with the national gymnastics team after refusing to treat an athlete with doping substances before the 1988 Seoul Olympics.

She said she had not felt safe in her home city of Beijing since 2012, when she first made her allegations of doping. She first started working with China’s national teams in the 1970s.

“In the 1980s and ’90s, Chinese athletes on the national teams made extensive use of doping substances,” she told ARD. “Medals were showered in doping. Gold, silver and bronze. All international medals should be withdrawn.”

WADA said it will examine “whether such a system may have prevailed beyond these decades.”

The first step, WADA said, was for its “independent intelligence and investigations team to initiate an investigative process in order to collect and analyze available information in coordination with external partners.”

Xue, who continued to work at lower levels after being dismissed from the national team in 1988, said she was only approached afterward when athletes developed problems because of the substances they were given.

“One trainer came to me and said, ‘Doctor Xue, the boys’ breasts keep getting bigger,’” Xue said. “These boys were about 13 to 14 years old.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Russia believes track ban may end soon

PyeongChang Olympic organizers downplay North Korea concern

AP
Leave a comment

ANCIENT OLYMPIA, Greece (AP) — PyeongChang Olympic organizers played down concern over ongoing tensions with North Korea and also say work has been completed on all venues for the Winter Games.

Lee Hee-beom, president of the PyeongChang organizing committee, said the International Olympic Committee has made it very clear that the Feb. 9-25 Winter Games will go ahead as scheduled.

Speaking at the birthplace of the ancient Olympics shortly after the last rehearsal for Tuesday’s official flame-lighting ceremony, Lee said “there is no Plan B.”

Lee said South Korean officials are working closely with all relevant parties to ensure the Winter Games are safe and secure.

He said his main concern for the Olympics is the weather.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Putin: U.S. pushing for Russia’s Olympic exclusion