Yohan Blake

Carl Lewis, Jamaican sprinters trade more verbal jabs

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The friction between Carl Lewis and Jamaican sprinting reappeared in India and the Bahamas last week.

First, the nine-time Olympic champion Lewis was asked about Usain Bolt during a media tour in India last week. He was also asked about Jamaican sprinting’s recent doping issues.

In one interview, Lewis was reported as saying of Bolt, “He needs to back up now and maybe respect me a little bit more.” The question referred to Bolt saying in 2012 he “lost all respect” for Lewis after Lewis made comments such as this to Sports Illustrated after the Beijing Olympics:

I’m still working with the fact that [Bolt] dropped from 10-flat to 9.6 in one year [personal best of 10.03 in the 100m in 2007 to a world record 9.69 in 2008]. I think there are some issues. I’m proud of America right now because we have the best random and most comprehensive drug testing program. Countries like Jamaica do not have a random program, so they can go months without being tested. I’m not saying anyone is on anything, but everyone needs to be on a level playing field.

Lewis was also asked about Bolt and then Jamaica’s doping issues in a TV interview in India.

On Bolt: “A lot of the things that he does and is able to do, there is no way an American could do. An American could not say, ‘I am a legend.’ … We would get crucified. It’s a different era. You’re allowed to talk about yourself more now. It’s just something that we couldn’t have ever done.”

In August, the World Anti-Doping Agency said “serious issues” were raised in a report that Jamaica carried out one out-of-competition drug test in the five months leading up to the 2012 Olympics.

That report proved Lewis’ comments after Beijing somewhat prophetic, comments he referenced in the India TV interview.

“A couple of years ago, I was attacked, especially by the Jamaicans and Usain, about my comments,” Lewis said. “But all of a sudden when what I said was true, everyone went silent. I think their issue should be, let’s go back and ask them [Jamaica] to show that they’re doing what’s supposed to be done because I don’t know of any country that’s had as many positive tests in the last three or four years than their country.”

Several sprint stars failed drug tests last year, including Jamaicans Veronica Campbell-Brown, Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson, American Tyson Gay and Trinidad and Tobago’s Kelly-Ann Baptiste.

Campbell-Brown was cleared due to flaws in test collection procedures and possible contamination of her urine sample. Powell and Simpson were suspended 18 months but have reportedly appealed.

Jamaican sprinters at last weekend’s World Relays in Nassau, Bahamas, responded to Lewis.

“He [Lewis] has been talking a lot of smack,” Olympic 100m and 200m silver medalist Yohan Blake said, according to the Jamaica Gleaner. “Even the other day in India, he said some things about Bolt, but we know we are clean, and we know we are good for the sport. We feel like we always have something to prove. We are taking all his records. There is no more for him.”

Blake and the Jamaica 4x200m relay team at the World Relays broke a world record held by a group that included Lewis from 1994, wiping Lewis’ name from the outdoor track and field world-record book.

Bolt and Lewis will continue to be intertwined going to the 2016 Olympics, where Bolt could tie the record for career track and field golds. Lewis and Finnish distance legend Paavo Nurmi each have nine. Bolt has six.

Video: Track runners collide at World Relays

What to watch at Drake Relays, Penn Relays

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Olympic gold medalists ramp up their track and field seasons at the Penn Relays and Drake Relays, live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold this weekend.

Athletes are working toward the U.S. Championships in June and the world championships in August.

First, the historic Penn Relays will air on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold on Friday (5:30-6:30 p.m. ET) and Saturday (12:30-3 p.m. ET).

USA vs. The World in men’s and women’s 4x100m, 4x400m and sprint medley relays will air live on Saturday from Franklin Field in Philadelphia. A full schedule is here.

The U.S. teams are led by Olympic relay champions English Gardner and Natasha Hastings. The full roster is here.

Rio Olympic rematches highlight the individual-event fields at the Drake Relays in Des Moines on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold from 3-5 p.m ET on Saturday. A full schedule is here.

Perhaps no field is deeper than the 100m hurdles. World-record holder Keni Harrison takes on Rio silver and bronze medalists Kristi Castlin and Nia Ali, plus 2008 Olympic champion Dawn Harper-Nelson.

The 110m hurdles contingent is strong as well. It features the last two Olympic champions, Jamaican Omar McLeod and American Aries Merritt, plus 2013 World champion David Oliver.

Grenada’s Kirani James and American LaShawn Merritt, who earned silver and bronze in Rio, go head-to-head again in the 400m at Drake.

The men’s 1500m is headlined by Rio Olympic 800m bronze medalist Clayton Murphy and London Olympic 1500m silver medalist Leo Manzano.

Rio bronze medalist Jenny Simpson races individually for the first time this year in the women’s 1500m.

That field also includes New Zealand’s Nikki Hamblin, who gained fame of her own in Rio. Hamblin and American Abbey D’Agostino fell in an Olympic 5000m heat and helped each other make it to the finish line. Both were praised for their sportsmanship.

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IOC president unsure whether esports should be considered sport

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Esports are gaining momentum in the international sports movement, but they are not close to becoming an Olympic sport.

“We are not yet 100 percent clear whether esports is really sport, with regard to physical activity and what it needs to be considered sport,” IOC president Thomas Bach said Tuesday, according to insidethegames. “We do not see an organization or a structure that will give us confidence, or guarantee, that in this area the Olympic rules and values of sport are respected and in place, and that the implementation of these rules are monitored and secured.”

The first clear step (of many) to become an Olympic sport is for the IOC to recognize the sport’s international governing body.

Esports will be added as a medal sport to the Asian Games in 2022, and has been praised by LA 2024 Olympic bid chairman Casey Wasserman, but it is not yet IOC recognized.

“We are watching it, we see the differences, we see the lack of organisation,” Bach said, according to the report. “But we also see the high engagement of youth in esports. Therefore, we have to carefully consider how this could be consolidated.”

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