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USOC set to discuss 2024 Olympic bid Tuesday


A potential 2024 Olympic bid is on a U.S. Olympic Committee board meeting agenda Tuesday in Boston. The USOC will probably narrow its list of bid candidates to two or three cities, chairman Larry Probst said two weeks ago.

Cities won’t be made public, Probst said then, but news could come out if cities announce they’re out of the running, such as New York and Philadelphia recently.

It has been reported that six cities are top contenders — Boston, Dallas, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco and Washington.

A key in narrowing cities (and ultimately deciding whether to bid and choosing a city) is what is attractive to the International Olympic Committee, whose members will vote to pick the 2024 Olympic host in 2017.

Another factor is Agenda 2020. The IOC is reviewing bidding procedures under Agenda 2020, a blueprint introduced by IOC president Thomas Bach shortly after his election last year.

A finalized Agenda 2020 is expected to go up for IOC approval in December. The USOC has said it hopes to decide if it will bid, and, if it does, which city, by the end of this year.

Robert Livingstone, producer of GamesBids.com, covering Olympic host city bidding, believes Los Angeles is the clear favorite for a 2024 U.S. bid. San Francisco and Boston would be his other finalists.

Los Angeles also hosted the 1932 and 1984 Olympics. The IOC recently awarded the Olympics to London for a third time for 2012 and Tokyo for a second for 2020.

“[Los Angeles] has a great legacy from last time in all areas — venues, capabilities, the people and the culture,” Livingstone said. “It’s less likely they’d have white elephants [large, unused facilities post-Games] with a great plan using what’s already there. They’ve got support, a great climate with the ocean nearby.”

San Francisco has never hosted an Olympics, but it also has Olympic bidding history. The USOC chose New York over San Francisco for its failed bid for 2012.

“An iconic U.S. city that would look well on the international stage,” Livingstone said. “You have some of the natural venues to host the events and a university infrastructure there, a sporting culture, and a lot of the big corporations to support things.”

Boston is the top non-California candidate with a preferable time zone, plenty of sports facilities and a decent amount of public support, Livingstone said.

Dallas and Washington must overcome a lack of appeal from failed runs for 2012 and 2016 U.S. bids (Washington tried in 2012. Dallas didn’t apply, but Texas neighbor Houston was in the running in 2012 and 2016).

Dallas’ geography may be a problem and, as The New York Times wrote, “the romance of Dallas may be a tough sell to IOC members.” Washington, too, has an inherent hurdle.

“From an international perspective, it’s linked too closely with government,” Livingstone said. “There’s no way around that.”

San Diego, which was initially linked to apply with Tijuana, Mexico (but no longer), must overcome being in the shadow of front-runner Los Angeles, Livingstone said.

Globally, potential 2024 bids from Paris, Rome and a South African city have been the most talked about. None are definite, though.

“The only certainty, although they’re not certain at all, is the USOC,” Livingstone said. “They’re probably the most likely to put in a bid at this point.”

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Shoma Uno wins Skate America as Jason Brown clears quad hurdle

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 22: Shoma Uno of Japan competes in the men short program at 2016 Progressive Skate America at Sears Centre Arena on October 22, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)
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Japan’s Shoma Uno became the youngest man to win Skate America since 2002, while Jason Brown landed a quadruple jump en route to second place in Hoffman Estates, Ill., on Sunday.

Uno, the 18-year-old Grand Prix Final bronze medalist, landed three quadruple jumps in his free skate after planting two in his leading short program Saturday.

Uno fell on triple jumps in both programs but still scored 279.34 total points, prevailed by 10.96 over Brown and became the youngest man to win Skate America since France’s Brian Joubert in 2002.

Reigning U.S. champion Adam Rippon was third, flipping places with Brown after the short program. Full results are here.

Brown, the 2015 U.S. champion, totaled personal-best scores in the free skate (182.63) and overall (268.38) en route to his third straight Skate America medal. Brown matched his career-best Grand Prix finish.

Brown had never landed a clean, fully rotated quad in competition before, and while Sunday’s jump was called under-rotated, it was still a benchmark for the 21-year-old.

“To hit it and be like, ‘Oh my god, keep going, keep going,'” Brown said on NBC. “I just dreamed about landing that quad in the program. I felt like it kept getting closer, but today it finally hit. … Now I know I can do it under pressure. I can do it skating last. I can do it at a Grand Prix, so I can do it anywhere.”

Rippon attempted one quad this weekend, falling in a free skate he said he had only been practicing for a week and a half.

“I’m pleased with what I did today,” Rippon said. “It was a strong program for October. … This is a good start to the season, and I really want to build on this.”

Brown and Rippon positioned themselves well to become the first American men to qualify for the Grand Prix Final since Jeremy Abbott in 2011, should they be in podium contention at their next Grand Prix starts.

Rippon returns for Trophée de France in three weeks. Brown next competes at NHK Trophy in five weeks.

The Grand Prix season continues this week at Skate Canada, highlighted by world champion Yevgenia Medvedeva of Russia, Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan and the Grand Prix return of 2010 Olympic ice dance champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada.

MORE: Full figure skating season broadcast schedule

Gracie Gold details weight issues in figure skating after Skate America struggles


Gracie Gold said she has struggled with weight issues this whole year and in recent seasons in reported comments after she finished fifth at Skate America on Saturday and then clarified them on Instagram Sunday.

“You don’t often see — there aren’t that many — you just don’t see overweight figure skaters for a reason,” Gold said Saturday, according to USA Today. “It’s just something I’ve struggled with this whole year and in previous seasons. It’s just difficult when you’re trying to do the difficult triple jumps. It’s something that I am addressing, but it’s obviously not where it should be for this caliber of competition.

“It’s just not what’s required for this sport. It’s a lean body sport, and it’s just not what I have currently.”

Gold fell once in her Skate America short program and twice in her free skate en route to her lowest Grand Prix finish (excluding Grand Prix Finals) since her debut at 2012 Skate Canada.

Gold also finished sixth out of six skaters in her first competition this season, the free-skate-only Japan Open on Oct. 1.

Gold was fourth at the world championships in April, falling from first after the short program. The U.S. champion was still dealing with that “worlds depression” in the summer, even considering skipping the fall Grand Prix season.

Her next scheduled competition is in three weeks at Trophée de France in Paris, which she won last season.

“We just need to adjust my physical shape and mental shape and see if the program can be salvaged for the rest of the year,” Gold said Saturday, according to Icenetwork.com.

Gold’s update on Sunday on Instagram is below.

MORE: Full figure skating season broadcast schedule

To all my fans and friends. Thank you for the concern you have voiced. My comments in the mixed zone were spoken in the heat of emotion. To clarify, I feel that my results this far in the season are a result of my decision to live a more "normal life" this past summer. I traveled and really took time off from being an elite athlete. For a figure skater, there is an ideal body weight for top performance. It's different for each athlete. That doesn't mean scary skinny, but rather a lean, wiry composition. I realize that I am at a healthy weight and I am rapidly regaining the strength and tone I desire. I just started back a little later than I needed to for peak fitness in October. In reading Christine Brennan's story I realize that I came across pretty negatively. In fact, rather than being unhappy with my programs, I think they are the best I've ever had! I remain committed to my sport and quest for World and Olympic success.

A photo posted by Gracie Gold (@graciegold95) on