Michael Phelps

Michael Phelps takes third; Conor Dwyer takes BMW

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Michael Phelps‘ loss at the Santa Clara Grand Prix was a big, big gain for training partner Conor Dwyer.

Dwyer erased a .25 of a second deficit on Phelps in the final 50 meters to win the 200m individual medley on Sunday, the meet’s final day. Phelps, in his third meet since taking 20 months off after the 2012 Olympics, fell to third behind Chase Kalisz.

Dwyer out touched Kalisz, 1:59.49 to 1:59.53 (video here). Phelps came in at 1:59.76 in his first 200m IM final since winning his third straight Olympic gold in the event in London.

The victory carried added significance for Dwyer. NBC Olympics and Universal Sports analyst Rowdy Gaines informed Dwyer before the final that if he won he would earn an extra $20,000 and a one-year use of a BMW as the overall Grand Prix series champion.

“I’m never racing for money, but I guess it was a nice reminder,” Dwyer said on Universal Sports. “A little extra incentive right there.”

Phelps swam more at the Santa Clara Grand Prix than at his previous two comeback meets combined. He also tied for the win in the 100m butterfly and finished second to the Olympic champions in the 100m and 200m freestyles.

“He’s light years ahead of where we started,” said Phelps’ coach, Bob Bowman, according to the San Jose Mercury News. “It’s only going to get better.”

Time will tell if Phelps goes with these four events moving forward, but he’s already among the top Americans two months into his competitive comeback. Here’s where he ranks on U.S. lists for 2014:

100m Freestyle
1. Nathan Adrian — 48.08
2. Michael Phelps — 48.8

200m Freestyle
1. Conor Dwyer — 1:47.86
2. Michael Phelps — 1:48.2

100m Butterfly
1. Ryan Lochte — 51.93
T2. Michael Phelps — 52.11
T2. Tom Shields — 52.11

200m IM
1. Conor Dwyer — 1:59.49
2. Chase Kalisz — 1:59.53
3. Michael Phelps — 1:59.76

U.S. swimmers are preparing for the U.S. Championships in Irvine, Calif., from Aug. 6-10 and the Pan Pacific Championships in Gold Coast, Australia, later in August.

Phelps could compete again before Nationals, reportedly in Athens, Ga., in three weeks.

In other finals Sunday, Missy Franklin notched her second victory in four events this weekend, earning the 100m backstroke title in 1:00.99 (video here). She also won the 200m free and was third in the 200m back Saturday and second in the 100m free Friday.

Franklin, who became the first woman to win six gold medals at a single World Championships last year, veered toward the edge of her lane line like she did in the 200m back Saturday.

“I happy I didn’t slam into it like I did last night,” said a smiling, laughing Franklin, a rising sophomore at California. “So I’ll totally take it.”

Three-time Russian Olympian Arkady Vyatchanin, who may soon switch countries, beat Olympic champion Matt Grevers in the 100m back, 54.34 to 54.95.

Olympic bronze medalist Caitlin Leverenz won the 200m IM in 2:12.61.

U.S. champion Kevin Cordes completed a breaststroke sweep, capturing the 100m breast in 1:00.91. Laura Sogar prevailed in the women’s 100m breast in 1:09.15.

Two-time South African Olympian Sebastien Rousseau took the men’s 200m butterfly in 1:58.50. Venezuelan Olympian Adreina Pinto won the women’s 200m fly in 2:10.59.

Rising college freshman Cierra Runge won the women’s 800m free in 8:26.71.

Katie Ledecky breaks another world record Sunday

IOC president wants life bans for Russian cheats

DOHA, QATAR - NOVEMBER 16: IOC President Thomas Bach closing remarks during the fourth day of the 21st ANOC General Assembly at the Sheraton Grand Hotel on November 16, 2016 in Doha, Qatar. (Photo by Mark Runnacles/Getty Images for ANOC)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Russian athletes and officials who are proven to have been part of a doping “manipulation system” should be banned for life from the Olympics, IOC President Thomas Bach said Thursday.

Bach gave his personal view one day before Canadian investigator Richard McLaren publishes a final report into alleged state-backed cheating at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

Proof of systematic doping would be “aggravated circumstances” to justify life bans, the IOC leader said at a news conference after a three-day executive board meeting.

“I would not like to see this person again at any Olympic Games in any function,” Bach said, noting that as an IOC disciplinary commission chairman he approved life bans for Austrian team members implicated in doping at the 2006 Turin Winter Games.

However, proving that individual athletes knew of systematic doping involving state agencies could be difficult.

McLaren, who was appointed by the World Anti-Doping Agency in May, is expected to give more detail about cheating operations at the Sochi laboratory.

In his interim report in July, McLaren confirmed claims by former lab director Grigory Rodchenkov of a hole-in-the-wall swapping system aided by the FSB security agency to exchange athletes’ dirty urine samples for clean ones.

Earlier Thursday, the IOC member appointed to oversee disciplinary cases that arise from McLaren’s evidence acknowledged they could be tough to prove.

“Can you prove (athletes) were aware?” Denis Oswald, a Swiss lawyer, said on the sidelines of a sports law conference in Geneva.

“It is not that we would be scared to attack high level people in the Russian regime,” the Swiss lawyer said. “The question is more on the legal point of view. Can you punish athletes if they have done nothing and whether they were not aware of what was happening?”

Bach has also appointed a second IOC commission, headed by former Switzerland president Samuel Schmid, to evaluate if McLaren’s report and evidence proves a state-run doping system.

“And then based on that we will see if we can start cases against athletes,” Oswald said.

Meanwhile, United States lawmakers want Bach to attend a congressional committee hearing next Thursday to provide an update on sports’ fight against doping.

“Unfortunately I cannot attend there,” said Bach, adding that the IOC will “provide by other means all the information they may need.”

MORE: Russia sets 2018 Olympics medal target

IOC president doesn’t rule out awarding 2028 Olympic host in 2017

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 23: The Olympic Flag waves as part of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony at Fisht Olympic Stadium on February 23, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Joe Scarnici/Getty Images)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — IOC President Thomas Bach says he wants to change the Olympic host city bidding procedure because it “produces too many losers.”

Bach’s comments came on the same day the IOC executive board cleared all three candidate cities for the 2024 Olympics — Paris, Los Angeles and Budapest, Hungary — to advance to the next stage of the race.

Bach did not categorically rule out the possibility of awarding the hosting rights for two games at once — 2024 and 2028 — when the IOC votes next September in Lima, Peru.

Bach said at a news conference “it is not the purpose of an Olympic candidature procedure to produce losers.”

He said the goal is “to produce the best possible host for an Olympic Games.”

Asked about speculation the IOC could award the 2024 and 2028 Olympics at the same time, he said: “Let us study this question, which is not an easy one.”

VIDEO: LA 2024 Olympic bid venue plan