Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius’ lawyers call reported final witness of murder trial

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Oscar Pistorius‘ suicide risk will increase unless he continues to receive mental health care, according to a mental health report read in court at his murder trial Wednesday.

Pistorius suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, according to a report read by Pistorius’ lawyer Barry Roux.

“Mr. Pistorius has been severely traumatized,” Roux read. “The degree of anxiety and the pressure that is present is significant. … Should he not receive proper clinical care, his condition is likely to worsen and increase the risk of suicide.”

The trial took a break from May 14 until Monday for Pistorius to undergo mental health evaluations that concluded he was not mentally ill when he shot and killed girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day 2013.

Pistorius, the first double amputee to run in the Olympics in 2012, shot four times through a locked door in his Pretoria home bathroom on Valentine’s Day 2013, hitting and killing Steenkamp inside. Pistorius said he thought Steenkamp was an intruder.

He faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder. If found not guilty of premeditated murder, Pistorius could be convicted of culpable homicide, South Africa’s version of manslaughter for negligent killing.

Also Wednesday, the 2012 South African Paralympic Team chief medical officer testified about Pistorius’ likeliness to “fight” rather than “flight” in the presence of danger given his disability.

The doctor, expected to continue to testify Thursday, was the final witness called by Pistorius’ defense team, according to reports from South Africa. The prosecution wrapped its case March 25.

Last week, one of Pistorius’ lawyers estimated the trial would probably last a couple more weeks. Here’s how The Associated Press described, in May, the expected final timeline of the trial after the final witness is called:

The trial is then expected to break for both sides to prepare closing arguments, which could take as little as a day to present. Then, the judge and her assessors will take however long they need to consider evidence before delivering a verdict.

Here’s NBC News’ coverage of the trial.

Obstacles for Tim Howard to return to Brazil for Olympics

The secret messages Lindsey Vonn wrote on her Olympic race suit

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SCHEDULE UPDATE: Vonn will will return for the final women’s downhill training run on Monday at 9 p.m. ET. LIVE STREAM

Look closely at Lindsey Vonn.

When NBC cameras zoom in on the two-time Olympic medalist, viewers will notice that she wrote a couple of messages on her uniform in permanent marker.

On the thumb of her right glove, Vonn has the word “believe” in Greek. It mirrors a tattoo she has on the inside of a finger.

“Signifying my last Olympics [in 2018] and just need to believe in myself,” Vonn said to NBC’s Nick Zaccardi.

On her helmet, Vonn has the initials “D.K.” and a heart. It is meant to honor her late grandfather, Don Kildow.

Kildow, who served in the Korean War from 1952-54, died on Nov. 1. Watch to learn more about Vonn’s special relationship with her grandparents:

Hard falls at Olympics, but no hard rules about concussions

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) — At the bottom of the Olympic aerials landing hill, where crashes are common and the term “slap back” is part of the everyday lingo, skiers spend almost as much time figuring out how to protect their heads as they do working on all those flips and spins.

“We learn how to fall,” U.S. jumper Jon Lillis said.

Elsewhere around the action-sports venue, that’s not so much the case.

Concussion dangers lurk everywhere — from the iced-over deck of the halfpipe, to the steeply pitched landings on the slopestyle course, to the careening twists and turns of the snowboard cross track, to the aerials course, where “slap back” is the term for when a skier’s head slaps backward against the snow. But at the Olympics, there are no hard-and-fast rules regarding who diagnoses head injuries, and no hard-and-fast protocol that athletes must clear to be allowed back on the slopes after a concussion.

“A bit concerning,” says neurologist Kevin Weber of the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. “Because you worry that athletes in other sports that may not be as popular as football are getting, I wouldn’t say ignored, but the concussions they’re getting are under-scrutinized.”

Read the full story at NBCOlympics.com