Tim Howard

Obstacles for Tim Howard to return to Brazil for Olympics

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If U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard makes his fourth World Cup team in 2018, he will be the oldest American World Cup player (at 39, by two years) since the U.S. returned to the tournament in 1990 for the first time in 40 years.

But what about 2016? Howard back in Brazil for the Rio Olympics would be intriguing, but the prospect faces hurdles.

In 2000, Howard made his only U.S. Olympic Team but did not play as a backup to Brad Friedel. The U.S. finished fourth.

Ever since, Howard’s age limited his Olympic chances. Olympic men’s soccer rosters are made up of players under 23 years old, with three exceptions per nation.

Recent Games have seen stars among those exceptions — Andrea Pirlo in 2004, Javier Mascherano and Ronaldinho in 2008 and Ryan Giggs and Luis Suarez in 2012.

Another obstacle is qualification. The U.S. cruelly missed the 2012 Olympics, giving up a stoppage-time goal in CONCACAF qualifying to El Salvador when it was seconds away from advancing to a winner-goes-to-London game.

Another issue is the Copa America Centenario in 2016, which runs June 3-26. The 2016 Olympics are Aug. 5-21, creating a possible scheduling conflict.

Copa America, which crowns South America’s soccer champion but also invites two non-South American nations, is traditionally not held in Olympic years. But CONMEBOL wanted to celebrate its 100-year anniversary by holding a special tournament in 2016.

So special that it’s allowing a non-South American host for the first time. That host is the United States, as if the U.S. Men’s National Team needed any more incentive to field its best possible squad.

Howard’s age, U.S. qualification and a crammed schedule aside, he does have domestic goalie competition in his favor.

His World Cup backup, Brad Guzan, already got his Olympic experience playing in 2008.

The third U.S. keeper at the Brazil World Cup, Nick Rimando, is only three months younger than Howard and therefore less likely to be near Howard’s form two years from now.

The top two goalies from 2012 qualification, Bill Hamid and Sean Johnson, were big reasons why the U.S. failed to make the Olympics for the second time since 1976.

While three overage players are allowed at the Olympics, the qualification rosters must be all U23s. Should the U.S. qualify for 2016 with a strong U23 goalie effort, it might be tough to bench him for a player who did not help the nation qualify. And what would the purpose be of using one of those three overage roster spots on a backup goalie?

There’s plenty of time for changes, though. We won’t know if the U.S. will qualify for Rio de Janeiro and, if it does, the final makeup of the Olympic roster until 2016.

Photos: World Cup stars who played in Olympics

Alysia Montano races pregnant again at USATF Outdoor Championships

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U.S. Olympic 800m runner Alysia Montaño raced five months pregnant in 110-degree heat at the USATF Outdoor Championships in Sacramento, Calif., on Thursday.

Montaño, who raced eight months pregnant at the 2014 USATF Outdoors also in Sacramento, finished last in her 800m first-round heat in 2:21.40. She was 10 seconds faster than her time three years ago.

“People were like, oh, you’re going to run faster than you did last time because you’re less pregnant,” Montaño told media in Sacramento, standing next to 2-year-old daughter Linnea. “I was like, I’m still pregnant.”

Athletes are looking for top-three finishes to qualify for the world championships in London in August. Finals are later this weekend.

USATF OUTDOORS: Men’s Preview | Women’s Preview
Broadcast Schedule | Full Results

In a Wonder Woman top, Montaño gritted her teeth on the final straightaway and raised her arms crossing the finish line.

“[In 2014] women let me know that my journey and my story had inspired them in so many different ways,” Montaño said. “I think there’s something about coming out to any venue, not really expecting to win, but just going along with the journey and seeing what comes out of it. And that’s the most beautiful part for me, being a track and field athlete, the platform that I have, I feel so responsible to be a representative of people who don’t have the same platform, don’t have the same voice that I do.

“I represent so many different people. I represent women. I represent black women. I represent pregnant women. Not everybody has the same platform that I do. I think it’s my responsibility to make sure I’m a voice and advocate for them.”

Montaño said she was inspired when she learned Gal Gadot, who played the title role in the movie “Wonder Woman,” filmed half of it while five months pregnant.

“I saw Wonder Woman, and I was like, I for sure am signing up for USA Nationals,” Montaño said. “I already was thinking I was going to do it.”

Montaño said it wasn’t easier or harder racing Thursday versus three years ago, when she had a bigger baby bump.

“The weird part about five months is you’re still growing and like shifting a lot,” she said. “So every week you have to readjust.”

Linnea has seen enough photos of her mom’s famous race in 2014 to know what was going on.

“I go, mom is going to run with your sibling in her belly,” Montaño recalled. “I did that with you, too. And [Linnea] was like, ‘Yeah, it was sticking out!'”

Montaño raced outdoors for the first time since falling in the Olympic Trials 800m final on July 4. Montaño had won the previous Olympic Trials (and finished fourth in London) and the 2015 U.S. title coming back from pregnancy.

She ran without an apparel sponsor Thursday, frustrated that Asics waited until December to say they were not interested in retaining her for 2017. Montaño said that left her no time to try and find a different sponsor, even though she was already planning to have her second child.

“You need to let an athlete know in September, October,” she said. “I’ve been calling [Asics] since September to be like, hey, I didn’t make the Olympic team, I’m 30, I’m going to have another baby.”

In the men’s 800m Thursday, two-time Olympian and 2013 World silver medalist Nick Symmonds was eliminated, 32nd-fastest of 33 runners in the first round.

Symmonds, in his final season, said he has one more race left — the Honolulu Marathon on Dec. 10.

MORE: Montaño finds little joy after Russian stripped of medals

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Tyson Gay, Trayvon Bromell eliminated in 100m heats at USATF Outdoors

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Olympians Tyson Gay and Trayvon Bromell were eliminated in the 100m first round at the USATF Outdoor Championships, failing to make the world championships team in the event.

Gay, 34, is racing this weekend eight months after the death of 15-year-old daughter Trinity Gay. His last attempt to make the world team is in the 200m on Saturday and Sunday in Sacramento, but Gay is an underdog there, too.

Gay was third in his 100m heat in 10.17 seconds on Thursday, well off his American record of 9.69 seconds set in 2009. The top two automatically made Friday’s semifinals.

“I had a slight stumble in the blocks and couldn’t really recover,” Gay told media in Sacramento, adding that he was dealing with minor injuries this year.

USATF OUTDOORS: Men’s Preview | Women’s Preview
Broadcast Schedule | Full Results

Starting in 2005, Gay had qualified for every Olympics and world championships except for 2011. He also was taken off the 2013 Worlds team for failing a drug test.

Gay is the last man to outsprint Usain Bolt at an Olympics or worlds, sweeping the 100m, 200m and 4x100m titles in 2007. Gay is the fastest man in history without an Olympic medal to his name.

Bromell, a 2015 World 100m bronze medalist, finished third in his heat in 10.22 fading in the last half. Bromell, 21, was racing for the first time since the Rio Olympics, coming back from Achilles surgery. He was racing hurt.

After summer surgery, Bromell kept off his foot until January, but when he returned to the track the pain came back. Bromell missed another month of training. He’s still dealing with inflammation, but a doctor said there’s no chance he could tear anything in Sacramento.

“When I got to like, 50 [meters], I started feeling some pain,” Bromell told media in Sacramento. “I wanted to show people that I’ve got heart.”

Bromell is not racing in the 200m this weekend, so he is definitively out of worlds in London in August.

“Next year, you’re going to see a new Trayvon,” he said.

The other favorites — Justin Gatlin and Christian Coleman — won their heats in 10.0 and 9.93, respectively, to advance. The final is also Friday, when the top three will qualify for the world 100m team and likely the top six for the 4x100m relay.

Gatlin said this year is “probably the most injured I’ve ever been.” He missed weeks of training, slowed by a quadriceps/groin problem since February, according to The Associated Press.

In the women’s 100m, all the favorites advanced to Friday’s semifinals, including Rio Olympic silver medalist Tori Bowie (10.90), nine-time Olympic medalist Allyson Felix (11.03) and Olympic Trials winner English Gardner (11.04).

Felix has a bye into the world championships 400m as defending champion, which she plans to race. Her worlds schedule beyond that is to be determined.

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