Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt arrives in Glasgow, says he’s injury free

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Usain Bolt‘s introductory press conference at his first Commonwealth Games was less memorable for his answers than for the questions asked — whether he’s ever worn a kilt, his thoughts on the Israel-Gaza situation and Scottish independence and multiple requests for selfies from the assembled media in Glasgow.

The most important bit of news is that he’s 100 percent recovered from a foot injury that delayed his 2014 debut.

“The injury has completely gone,” Bolt said.

Bolt arrived at the multi-sport event Saturday (to bagpipes!) for his first race(s) of the season, a 4x100m relay heat Friday, and if gold medal favorite Jamaica advances, the final next Saturday.

The six-time Olympic champion and 100m and 200m world-record holder doesn’t usually show up for heats in relays, but he’s doing so in Glasgow because he hasn’t raced since going head to head with a bus Dec. 14.

“I need the runs, really, because these are my first runs for the season,” Bolt said. “I really need to get it going.”

Bolt isn’t contesting individual races in Glasgow because he didn’t compete at the Jamaican trials and didn’t want to take a spot from somebody who did run there. A foot injury first reported in March pushed back his preparations for the season and saw him pull out of scheduled meets.

“I don’t know what running shape I’m in,” Bolt said, before clarifying. “I know I’m in good shape running-wise, but actually competing is always different.”

Those were answers to the most pertinent questions at the press conference. Others were more out of left field.

First, he was asked if he had ever worn a kilt.

“No, I haven’t,” Bolt said. “I was told I was going to get one. So, we’ll see how that works out.”

He was then offered a kilt by somebody nearby.

“Red is not my color,” Bolt said.

Bolt will be in Glasgow for a week and, though he said he expects to spend a lot of time in his athletes village room, hopes to see the Jamaican women’s netball team.

He’s not scheduled for any individual races this season until Aug. 14 on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

Olympic champion wrestler signs with UFC

‘Olympic Pride, American Prejudice’ film on Berlin 1936 on the way

Jesse Owens
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“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” a documentary on 18 African-American Olympians at the Berlin 1936 Games, is set to be screened in the spring and be narrated and executive produced by Blair Underwood, according to Variety.

The group of 18, headlined by Jesse Owens, competed in the face of Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler on the brink of World War II.

Trailers for the film are here and here.

From the film’s website:

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice is a feature length documentary exploring the trials and triumphs of 18 African American Olympians in 1936. Set against the strained and turbulent atmosphere of a racially divided America, which was torn between boycotting Hitler’s Olympics or participating in the Third Reich’s grandest affair, the film follows 16 men and two women before, during and after their heroic turn at the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. They represented a country that considered them second class citizens and competed in a country that rolled out the red carpet in spite of an undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism. They carried the weight of a race on their shoulders and did the unexpected with grace and dignity.

The athletes experienced things that they were not expecting—applause, warm welcomes, integrated Olympic villages and the respect of their competitors. They were world heroes yet returned home to a short-lived glory. This story is complicated. This story is triumphant but unheralded.”

MORE: See ‘Race’ film poster

Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims’ families detail massacre in documentary

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Family members of the Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims “described the extent of the cruelty” in interviews for “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” an upcoming documentary on the massacre, according to The New York Times.

Eleven Israeli athletes and officials were killed after being taken hostage by a Palestinian group in the athletes’ village nearly 40 years ago, with nine dying in a failed rescue attempt.

In 1992, widows of two of the victims learned details of how the athletes and officials were treated — including via graphic photographs — and recently spoke publicly about it, according to the newspaper.

“What they did is that they cut off his genitals through his underwear and abused him,” Ilana Romano said through a translator of husband Yossef Romano, an Olympic weightlifter, according to the newspaper. “Can you imagine the nine others sitting around tied up? They watched this.”

The documentary “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” announced earlier this year, is set to be released in early 2016. Here’s an interview with one of the film’s producers.

In 2014, it was announced that a $2.3 million memorial in Munich was planned to remember the victims, with the International Olympic Committee contributing $250,000.

At Rio 2016, a moment of remembrance will be held during the Closing Ceremony and a special mourning area will be in the Olympic village to honor those who have died during an Olympic Games.

PHOTOS: Munich 1972 Olympic sites, including massacre site