Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong still considers himself a Tour de France winner (video)

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Lance Armstrong still sees himself as a seven-time Tour de France winner, he told Dan Patrick in an interview aired Thursday.

“I don’t like arguing and fighting about it, but you asked me if I feel that way, I say yes, but I also know very well that there are many, many people that don’t agree with that. I respect that, I understand that.”

Armstrong, who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles in 2012 and confessed to doping throughout his career, also said he doesn’t wear a Livestrong bracelet anymore.

He said for the first time in his life he’s “truly fearless.”

“Obviously, I was beholden to a very dark secret that just sucked,” Armstrong said. “There was a lot of pressure there that I don’t have anymore. The slate is clean, and I can kind of do whatever I want going forward.”

Armstrong also sympathized with fellow performance-enhancing drug user Mark McGwire in a wide-ranging interview.

“Let’s not forget, he helped save that game after all of the drama of the strike and low attendance,” Armstrong said. “We’d be hypocrites to say they didn’t help save the game.”

Armstrong was asked what the reaction would be if he walked on the Champs-Elysees in Paris wearing a yellow jersey.

“I don’t think I want to do that,” Armstrong said.

Armstrong said he followed this year’s Tour de France, won by Italian Vincenzo Nibali, loosely when he wasn’t mountain biking in Aspen, Colo.

He also declined to say if he was a greater cyclist than three-time Tour winner Greg LeMond, with whom he has an icy relationship.

Armstrong did share a story of a cab ride in central Paris about nine months ago, and was asked how he would fare in the Tour if, hypothetically, he trained for it now and entered in 2015.

“Not very well,” said Armstrong, who has been banned for life. “At 43, 44 years old, I could finish, but I’d get spanked.”

Mark McGwire remembers 1984 Olympic baseball

Tommie Smith, John Carlos set to join Team USA at White House

FILe - In this Oct. 16, 1968, file photo, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward while extending gloved hands skyward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left. Smith and Carlos, the American sprinters whose raised-fist salutes at the 1968 Olympics are an ageless sign of race-inspired protest, will join the U.S. Olympic team at the White House next week for its meeting with President Barack Obama. Smith and Carlos were sent home from the Olympics after raising their black-gloved fists in a symbolic protest during the U.S. national anthem. They called it a ``human rights salute.''
The USOC asked them to serve as ambassadors as it tries to make its own leadership more diverse. (AP Photo/File)
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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Tommie Smith and John Carlos, the American sprinters whose raised-fist salutes at the 1968 Olympics are an ageless sign of race-inspired protest, will join the U.S. Olympic team at the White House next week for its meeting with President Barack Obama.

Smith and Carlos were sent home from the Olympics after raising their black-gloved fists in a symbolic protest during the U.S. national anthem. They called it a “human rights salute.”

USOC CEO Scott Blackmun asked them to serve as ambassadors as the federation tries to bring more diversity to its own ranks. They will join the team at the White House next Wednesday, then later that evening at an awards celebration in Washington.

The sprinters have been referenced frequently in the recent protests, spurred by Colin Kaepernick, during national anthems at NFL games. One player, Marcus Peters of the Chiefs, raised his own black-gloved fist before Kansas City’s season opener.

“I think Tommie and John have played an important and positive role in the evolution of our attitudes about diversity and inclusion, not only in the United States but around the world,” Blackmun said Friday night at a dinner to celebrate the U.S. performance in Brazil this summer.

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Wilson Kipsang: I am very focused on the marathon world record

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The men’s marathon world record has been broken five of the last nine years at the Berlin Marathon.

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang, who broke the world record at the 2013 Berlin Marathon, believes that he can do it again on Sunday, when the race will stream live on the NBC Sports app beginning at 2:30 a.m. ET.

“I’ve trained well and, three years down the line from my world record here, I feel good and believe I have the potential to attempt the world record once more,” he said at today’s press conference, according to the IAAF. “Running at the top level, there is a lot of wear and tear on the body, especially when you are running for a time, but I am very focused on the world record.”

Kipsang clocked 2 hours, 3 minutes, 23 seconds when he broke the world record in 2013. A year later, fellow Kenyan Dennis Kimetto lowered it to 2:02:57 on the same course. Kimetto will not race in Berlin this year.

Kipsang will be challenged by Kenyan compatriot Emmanuel Mutai, who has the fastest time (2:03:13) in the field, and Ethiopia’s Kenenisa Bekele.

Bekele is a three-time Olympic track champion and the 5000m and 10,000m world-record holder, but acknowledged that his marathon personal best of 2:05:04 places him a distant fourth in the field.

“I consider my personal best of 2:05 to be slow compared to the best runners,” he said. “I want to run as fast as I can on Sunday and beat my best.”

MORE: Berlin Marathon to live stream on NBC Sports app