Mark McGwire

Mark McGwire remembers baseball’s Olympic boom in 1984

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ANAHEIM, Calif. — Mark McGwire most often recalls the 1984 Olympics when asked to autograph his rookie card.

No. 401 in the 1985 Topps set depicts a toothy-grinned 20-year-old USC first baseman. Bat over his right shoulder. Marlboro cigarettes signage beyond his left. Team USA jersey and cap.

McGwire was at Shea Stadium, on a pre-Olympic tour.

“As a young kid, playing baseball, you think someday I might have a baseball card, right?” McGwire, now the Dodgers hitting coach, said before a Freeway Series game at Angel Stadium on Wednesday. “I remember thinking [before the photo shoot], if that’s my first baseball card, I’m going to get a wood bat. I didn’t want to have an aluminum bat in my hand [aluminum bats were used in NCAA and Olympic baseball]. I want to say it was a Louisville [Slugger]. Even though I used Rawlings my whole life.”

Today is the 30th anniversary of the first Olympic baseball tournament gold-medal final, when it was a demonstration sport played at Dodger Stadium at the Los Angeles Games. Medals were awarded, but the one currently dangling in McGwire’s office isn’t “official” like those earned by Carl Lewis or Mary Lou Retton.

Baseball had been a very loose part of some Olympics as far back as 1904, mostly in one-game exhibitions before 1984, “sometimes on a makeshift diamond in the middle of a track and field layout.”

It became a standard sport starting in 1992 until it was voted out of the Olympic program after the 2008 Beijing Games.

In 1984, McGwire and 19 more college players made up what he later called a dream team — notables included Will Clark and Barry LarkinKen Caminiti was among the final cuts after quite the selection process, according to Sports Illustrated:

More than 3,000 candidates, including a 12-year-old girl and a 43-year-old man, participated in 63 open one-day tryouts that began last fall.

McGwire is the most recognizable player to ever don a U.S. Olympic baseball uniform, two years before his Major League debut and 14 years before he broke Roger Maris‘ single-season home-run record during a career tainted by steroid use.

He called the 1984 Olympic team the greatest collection of U.S. amateur players up to that date. Eighteen of the 20 Olympians were drafted in MLB’s first round in 1984 or 1985.

“A lot of us had nice careers in the big leagues afterwards,” McGwire said, reeling off names, “but we came up just short in that last game.”

Japan shocked the U.S. for gold, 6-3, after losing six of their seven pre-Olympic exhibition meetings.

McGwire had one hit in the final, finishing the five-game competition a disappointing four for 21 with no home runs.

He smacked 32 homers in his final season at USC that year, before going to the A’s with the 10th overall pick in the June draft. He hit .359 in a 37-game pre-Olympic tour, according to his book, “Mark McGwire: Home Run Hero.”

“It’s just like playing well in the playoffs prior to the World Series, and all of a sudden you don’t play well in the World Series,” McGwire said. “You’re talking 30 years ago. I don’t really remember. I remember I didn’t do very well.”

source:  Despite little reported TV coverage, major U.S. news outlets still deemed Olympic baseball a success, the unusual sound of aluminum dings inside Dodger Stadium drowned out by cheers of game crowds greater than 50,000. And an Asian umpire signaling balls and strikes with white gloves, according to The New York Times.

“It was like a World Series atmosphere,” McGwire said. “For never being in a World Series at the time. Now I know what a World Series is like. But it was awesome, it really was. A packed house.”

The U.S. became overwhelming favorites when Cuba joined the Soviet Union-led boycott two months before the Opening Ceremony. McGwire says now he doesn’t remember any chatter among the Americans about missing the Cubans. Give him a break, it was 30 years ago, but here’s what he told Sports Illustrated before the Olympics:

“I don’t see how we can miss getting the gold,” says McGwire. “The only team that could have competed with us was the Cubans. It’s too bad they’re boycotting. The teams we’re playing just can’t compete with our power.”

The U.S. was joined in the eight-team tournament by Japan, Canada, the Dominican Republic (Cuba’s replacement), Italy, Nicaragua, South Korea and Taiwan.

First, McGwire marched in the Opening Ceremony at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, across the street from USC.

“I remember when we were at USC at Heritage Hall, they had all the captains for all the sports take a photo,” McGwire said. “I have it somewhere in storage, but there was a young guy by the name of Michael Jordan that was there [Jordan, like McGwire, played at the Los Angeles Olympics two months after being drafted]. So it was pretty cool. I remember the baseball players were battling the basketball players on who’s going to be the last Americans to come out of the tunnel [to march at the end of the Parade of Nations]. We were all together.”

McGwire earned the first base job over Clark, perhaps boosted by the fact Team USA’s manager was also McGwire’s coach at USC, Rod Dedeaux. Clark went to the outfield.

“And you know, there was a guy who never played,” McGwire added. “Barry Larkin.”

Larkin actually did play a little in the Olympics, but McGwire said the primary middle infielders were San Diego State’s Flavio Alfaro who never played in the majors — and Oklahoma State’s Gary Green.

“From what I was told, it was because [Larkin] was the younger kid on the block,” McGwire said. “He was the sophomore. But, Hall of Famer. To think he didn’t really play that much. It’s amazing to think why he didn’t, but that’s how Rod made the lineup.”

The U.S. fared fine without Larkin at the start of the Olympics, winning all four of its games en route to the final, including 16-1 and 12-0 wins over Italy and the Dominican Republic, respectively. They had a nine-run first inning against Italy.

“In ’83, we went over to Amsterdam,” McGwire said. “I just remember people saying, baseball’s just starting over here. They’re learning how to play the game of baseball. We had a chance to play it since we were little kids.”

In past interviews, McGwire lamented a grueling pre-Games, six-week nationwide tour, where he played in big-league stadiums against local college all-star teams and at more barnstorming outposts like Battle Creek, Mich., and Tri-Cities, Wash., with few days off.

“I may have made it to the majors a year sooner [if it hadn’t been for the Olympics],” McGwire told the Los Angeles Times in 1992. “If I had to do it again, I don’t know if I would.”

That feeling wasn’t palpable inside Angel Stadium on Wednesday. McGwire grinned and joked, remembering his first run-ins with Don Zimmer and Reggie Jackson on that tour, and his one regret.

“It was a great honor,” he said. “Unfortunately, I wish I could say that I had a gold medal for it.”

Olympic champions join ‘Biggest Loser’ cast

Yulia Stepanova, doping whistleblower, appeals her Olympic ban

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS - JULY 06:  Yuliya Stepanova looks on after finishing last in the Womens 800m heats during day one of the 23rd European Athletics Championships at Olympic Stadium on July 6, 2016 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.  (Photo by Matthew Lewis/Getty Images for European Athletics )
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Whistleblower Yulia Stepanova‘s hopes of competing in the Summer Olympics are all but over. Her fight to expose doping and corruption is not.

“It’s OK to lose a good fight,” Stepanova’s husband, Vitaly Stepanov, told The Associated Press on Monday.

They have appealed to the International Olympic Committee to reverse its decision, handed down Sunday, that denies Stepanova a chance at competing in the Rio Games, which begin Aug. 5. The decision, the Stepanovs claim, is based on incorrect information, including the IOC’s framing of Stepanova’s decision to become a whistleblower as a too-little-too-late desperation play made after the Russian team had cast her aside.

It’s a conclusion that both the World Anti-Doping Agency and track’s governing body, the IAAF, disagree with; both recommended Stepanova be allowed to compete in Rio.

But Stepanov said he received several signals that the IOC would not go along, beginning with a general lack of interest from the key decision makers. He said that during the push for Olympic eligibility, he spoke with two separate IOC officials for a total of 90 minutes.

“I think what the IOC didn’t do is spend enough time to understand how big the problem is in Russia and how much covering up is happening in Russian sports,” he said.

Stepanova was the 800-meter runner who was entrenched in the Russian doping system but later came forward with details about the cheating. That triggered investigations that led to the banning of the Russian track team from the Olympics. After receiving more information about Russian sports as a whole, the IOC opted against a ban of the entire Russian team.

Part of that decision included a ruling that any Russian with a previous doping ban would not be allowed in Rio. That includes Stepanova, though the legality of that ruling is in question: In 2011, the Court of Arbitration for Sport invalidated the IOC’s Rule 45, which called for Olympic bans for any athlete who’d served more than a six-month doping penalty. CAS said it amounted to double jeopardy.

It was one of several facets from the decision handed down Sunday that indicated the difficulty the IOC had in finding the right balance between, as president Thomas Bach called it, “individual justice and collective responsibility.” There also were political concerns; a Russian official addressed the IOC executive board and told members not to cave into geopolitical pressure.

While Russia largely welcomed the decision, it was roundly criticized by those in the anti-doping world. The move to ban Stepanova was widely viewed as the worst part of the judgment.

“The decision to refuse her entry in to the Games is incomprehensible and will undoubtedly deter whistleblowers in the future from coming forward,” said Travis Tygart, CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

Stepanov said his wife got a bout of the stomach flu on Sunday – making a bad day that much worse.

She was training for the Olympics, knowing that if she made it, she would not compete for a medal, the way she had in the past.

“Her goal is to participate,” Stepanov said. “In my view, she deserved to be an Olympian a lot more than when she was a doped athlete.”

But the odds are against her.

Stepanov said there is no money to fund an appeal to CAS, which would have the last say on her possible ban.

“Sunday was a day to cry a little, to get disappointed,” Stepanov said. “But today’s Monday. We feel we’re trying to fight for the right thing, so we wake up and start fighting again.”

MORE: Russian whistleblower denied bid to compete in Rio Olympics

Gabby Douglas ‘a very strong possibility’ for all-around, Martha Karolyi says

Gabby Douglas
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Gabby Douglas has “a very strong possibility” to get a chance to defend her Olympic all-around title in Rio, U.S. national team coordinator Martha Karolyi said Monday.

“Gabby’s preparation is in a very, very good direction, and I foresee that she can be in the all-around, but we’re not taking this decision as of now yet,” Karolyi said.

The U.S. will put no more than three women from its five-woman team in the all-around in qualifying. The top two Americans in qualifying will advance to the all-around final, the most prestigious individual competition in the sport.

“We have a tentative lineup, but that’s absolutely tentative and we would not reveal that lineup at the moment yet, because most likely there will be changes as time goes,” said Karolyi, adding that the lineup won’t be finalized until next week.

Simone Biles is considered a lock to be one of the all-arounders in qualifying. Who joins her is unclear.

Douglas and Aly Raisman were tapped at the 2015 World Championships, with Biles and Douglas topping Raisman in qualifying and then going one-two in the all-around final.

However, both Raisman and first-year senior Laurie Hernandez finished higher than Douglas in the all-around at the P&G Championships and the Olympic Trials in the last month.

Karolyi said that Douglas, who fell off the balance beam on both nights at the Olympic Trials, has improved at a pre-Olympic training camp. Karolyi also said that Douglas would not perform the difficult Amanar vault in Rio, which carries five tenths more in start value than the vault Douglas used at the Olympic Trials.

Biles and Raisman both perform the Amanar. If Biles, Douglas and Raisman do the all-around in qualifying, Douglas will go in with a start-value disadvantage in the chase to grab two available final spots.

In 2012, Douglas, Raisman and Jordyn Wieber all did the all-around in qualifying, with the 2011 World all-around champion Wieber finishing third out of the Americans (and fourth overall), missing the all-around final.

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