2014 Phillips 66 National Championships

Ryan Lochte wins 200 IM over Michael Phelps at Nationals

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IRVINE, Calif. — Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps performed like the rivals of old in their final race of the U.S. Championships on Sunday, putting four days of shaky swims behind them.

Lochte edged Phelps by .05 in the 200m individual medley for his first victory of the meet.

“It’s been hard throughout this whole year,” said Lochte, who re-tore an MCL in the spring after initially injuring the knee when an overzealous fan ran into him in November. “My confidence wasn’t really there because I always rely on my training. … This year, I haven’t done that training.”

Lochte, the 11-time Olympic medalist, won in 1:56.5, barely holding off the charging Phelps on the final 50 meters of freestyle.

Lochte’s title came less than a month after Phelps beat him in all three of their races together at a meet in Athens, Ga. That was Lochte’s first meet since April.

Lochte also ensured that Phelps showed up at Nationals and failed to win a single race for the first time since the 2000 U.S. Olympic Trials, when he was 15 and made the Sydney team by finishing second in the 200m butterfly.

“We both hate to lose to one another,” Phelps said, “but we enjoy racing against each other.”

Phelps, in his fifth meet since a 20-month competitive retirement, had two runner-ups, a sixth and a seventh in four events. He also clocked the fastest 100m butterfly in the world this year, but it was in the preliminary heats.

“I’m a lot happier with finishing [the meet] like that [the third-fastest 200m IM time in the world this year] than finishing with some of the sub-par performances that I’ve had throughout the finals sessions of this meet,” Phelps said.

Next up: the Pan Pacific Championships in Gold Coast, Australia, from Aug. 21-25. There, Lochte and Phelps will face swimmers from nations outside Europe in the biggest international meet of the year.

They are free to enter any individual events they like in Gold Coast.

“If I want to be where I want to be, I know what I have to do,” Phelps said. “Some of these races really upset me, frustrated myself and [coach] Bob [Bowman].”

In other events Sunday, Anthony Ervin won the 50m freestyle in 21.55, 14 years after he tied for Olympic gold in the event. Nathan Adrian was second in 21.69, followed by Cullen Jones, who snuck onto the Pan Pacs team.

Simone Manuel won the women’s 50m free in 24.56. Twelve-time Olympic medalist Natalie Coughlin was sixth, failing to make the Pan Pacs team.

Three women’s stars miss Pan Pacs, Worlds

Michael McBroom took the 800m freestyle in 7:49.66, improving on his third-fastest time in the world this year. McBroom won 800m free silver at the 2013 World Championships.

Melanie Margalis won the women’s 200m individual medley in 2:10.20, the third-fastest time in the world this year. Olympic bronze medalist Caitlin Leverenz was third to sneak onto the Pan Pacs team.

Katy Campbell knocked 27.11 seconds off her personal best to win the women’s 1500m free in 16:17.69.

Katie Ledecky‘s world record in the 1500m free from June 19 is 15:34.23. Ledecky, who broke the 400m world record Saturday, decided not to swim the 1500m free.

U.S. roster for Pan Pacs

Michael Phelps ‘would probably do’ another Olympics if not for injury risk

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Michael Phelps said he would probably swim another Olympic cycle if it wasn’t for the possibility of injury, particularly with his shoulders.

“If you could guarantee me that I would never get injured in four years, and I would never have any problems with my shoulders or anything like that in four years, I’d probably do it again because I had more fun this time around,” Phelps said in a social media video Friday. “But I don’t want to risk that and not be able to spend time with Booms [son Boomer] when he grows up and watch him and be a part of every single part of his life when he gets older and older. So I think that’s something, for me, that I will never put my body through. I won’t take that chance. I think my body is way more important and my family is way more important than going another four years to swim in one more Olympics.”

Phelps’ right shoulder was a particular issue in his comeback for the Rio Olympics. He received two cortisone shots in the months before the Games, leading coach Bob Bowman to say that Phelps was “75 percent” of what he was at the 2008 Beijing Games, according to Sports Illustrated.

(Phelps has said he didn’t compete at 100 percent in Beijing, given an October 2007 broken wrist that interrupted training.)

Phelps reiterated, repeatedly as usual, during the 70-minute video that he would not return to competitive swimming. He still swims recreationally “for peace of mind” and “meditation.”

What about retirement saddens him?

“Not having the chance to represent my country anymore is something bums me out,” Phelps said, particularly hearing the national anthem atop the medal stand.

Phelps has plenty to keep him busy. The most pressing is testifying at a congressional hearing looking at improving the flawed anti-doping system in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

“I have a lot to say,” Phelps said. “To have that opportunity to speak out about my true feelings. I’ve never really, truly been able to do it.”

He began outlining those words Friday and said he had until Sunday to finish a page or a page and a half to present to the subcommittee.

“There are too many people who are cheating, that’s the easiest way to say it,” Phelps said. “Look what happened at the [Rio] Olympics, all the athletes that tested positive that were still allowed to compete. I think that’s wrong, and I think it’s unfair. I think that’s something that needs to clean.”

In Rio, Phelps praised teammate Lilly King‘s criticisms of athletes competing who had previously served doping punishments (such as King’s breaststroke rival, Russian Yuliya Yefimova). Phelps doubts he has ever competed in a clean race.

“I think you’re going to probably see a lot of people speaking out more,” Phelps said in Rio, according to The Associated Press. “I think [King] is right, I think something needs to be done. It’s kind of sad today in sports in general, not just in swimming, there are people who are testing positive who are allowed back in the sport and multiple times. It kind of breaks what sport is meant to be and that’s what pisses me off.”

Phelps said Friday that he hopes to help “clean the sports up so we can get back to why we play sports.”

“I don’t think any athlete should ever have that feeling that somebody else is at an advantage of using a performance-enhancing drug to help them,” he said. “I had these massive dreams and goals of things I wanted to accomplish and achieve, and never were they because I thought I could take an easy way by cheating. I basically just worked as hard as I could and made sure that my body was as prepared as I could possibly make it for every single meet. So I was able to accomplish the goals and dreams that I had. That’s something that I’m going to Congress to talk about.”

Phelps also added in Friday’s video that he hopes another swimmer will come along and break his records, that he was recently knocked out of a poker tournament by his wife and he will be in Budapest for the world championships in July.

Just not as a competitor.

MORE: Ledecky’s latest American record faster than Ryan Lochte at same age

Dawn Harper-Nelson makes tearful plea about banned medication

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND - AUGUST 24: Dawn Harper-Nelson of the United States after winning the Women's 100m Hurdles during the Diamond League at Alexander Stadium on August 24, 2014 in Birmingham, England.  (Photo by Ben Hoskins/Getty Images)
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In a tearful social media video, Olympic 100m hurdles champion Dawn Harper-Nelson said Thursday that she was “afraid for my life” because she’s not allowed to take prescribed blood-pressure medication that is banned by anti-doping authorities.

“I just want to say that this is not fair, that I’m afraid for my life,” she said. “I’m about to go into urgent care, because my blood pressure’s really high again. And USADA [U.S. Anti-Doping Agency] said I can’t take the medicine the doctors giving me. And they’re giving me a new medicine. This is just not OK. My head’s bothering me, my vision’s kind of blurry, and they said my blood pressure is high. I’m scared. People need to be aware, this is not cool.”

Harper-Nelson is serving a three-month ban after previously taking a prescribed medication and failing to learn that it contained a banned substance. She said she was prescribed the medication after being rushed to an emergency room and diagnosed with high blood pressure. The ban ends March 1.

Athletes can request therapeutic use exemptions (TUEs) through USADA if they have an illness or condition that requires the use of medication listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List. It’s not clear if Harper-Nelson has requested a TUE for medication containing a banned substance.

Harper-Nelson tested positive for the banned diuretic hydrochlorothiazide, which is on the prohibited list, and related metabolites on Dec. 1, according to USADA:

Harper-Nelson’s explanation that her positive test was caused by a blood pressure medication she was prescribed by a physician to treat hypertension. Harper-Nelson further explained that she made efforts to determine if the medication contained prohibited substances; however, due to using partial search terms, those efforts were unsuccessful.

On Thursday, A USADA official reached out to Harper-Nelson on Twitter. USADA has not commented on the situation.

Harper-Nelson won the 2008 Olympic 100m hurdles title and took silver behind Sally Pearson in 2012. She failed to make the Rio Olympic team, getting eliminated in the Olympic Trials semifinals.

The U.S. trio in Rio swept the medals — Brianna RollinsNia Ali and Kristi Castlin.

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