2014 Phillips 66 National Championships

U.S. swimming roster for Pan Pacific Championships

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IRVINE, Calif. — Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte, Missy Franklin and Katie Ledecky headline the 60-swimmer U.S. roster for the Pan Pacific Championships.

The team was finalized at the U.S. Championships here this past week.

It will next head to Brisbane, Australia for a training camp and then Gold Coast for Pan Pacs, the year’s major international meet, from Aug. 21-25. NBC Universal will have coverage of the meet.

Swimmers who made the team can enter any individual event they want at Pan Pacs, but only two swimmers per nation can qualify for finals at Pan Pacs.

Pan Pacs pit U.S. swimmers against the world’s best swimmers outside of Europe.

Here’s the team:

Women
Cammile Adams
Haley Anderson
Kathleen Baker
Rachel Bootsma
Elizabeth Beisel
Lisa Bratton
Claire Donahue
Maya DiRado
Eva Fabian
Hali Flickinger
Missy Franklin — Five Olympic medals
Jessica Hardy
Christine Jennings
Breeja Larson
Micah Lawrence
Katie Ledecky — Olympic 800m free champion
Felicia Lee
Caitlin Leverenz
Madeline Locus
Becca Mann
Simone Manuel
Melanie Margalis
Ivy Martin
Katie McLaughlin
Elizabeth Pelton
Cierra Runge
Leah Smith
Kendyl Stewart
Shannon Vreeland
Abbey Weitzeil

Men
Nathan Adrian — Olympic 100m free champion
Tyler Clary — Olympic 200m back champion
Kevin Cordes
Conor Dwyer
Matt Ellis
Anthony Ervin — 2000 Olympic 50m free champion
Jimmy Feigen
Nic Fink
Andrew Gemmell
Matt Grevers — Olympic 100m back champion
Connor Jaeger
Cullen Jones
Chase Kalisz
Ryan Lochte — 11 Olympic medals
Reed Malone
Cody Miller
Michael McBroom
Matt McLean
Alex Meyer
Ryan Murphy
Jacob Pebley
Michael Phelps — 22 Olympic medals
Tim Phillips
David Plummer
Josh Prenot
Sean Ryan
Tom Shields
Nick Thoman
Michael Weiss
Jordan Williamovsky

Long jumper Marquis Dendy to miss Rio Olympics

BEIJING, CHINA - AUGUST 24:  Marquis Dendy of the United States competes in the Men's Long Jump qualification during day three of the 15th IAAF World Athletics Championships Beijing 2015 at Beijing National Stadium on August 24, 2015 in Beijing, China.  (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)
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Long jumper Marquis Dendy withdrew from the U.S. Olympic team due to a right leg injury and will be replaced by the next-highest qualified finisher from the Olympic Trials, Mike Hartfield.

Dendy, 23, was fourth at the Olympic Trials but made the three-man team because third-place finisher Will Claye did not have the Olympic standard mark during the qualifying window from May 1, 2015, through the Olympic Trials and thus cannot compete in the event Rio (he did make it in the triple jump).

Dendy, who came into the Olympic Trials with a leg injury, suffered another leg injury on his fourth of six possible finals jumps at Trials on July 3 and passed on the remaining two jumps.

Dendy finished 21st at the 2015 World Championships in his first global championship and is ranked fourth in the world this year.

Hartfield, 26, finished fifth at the Olympic Trials and is going to his first Olympics. He was 12th at the 2015 World Championships.

MORE: Complete U.S. Olympic team roster

What’s troubling athletes arriving in Rio? No ‘Pokemon Go’

Pokemon Go
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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — So the plumbing and electricity in the athletes’ village took several days to fix. Who cares?

But no “Pokemon Go”? That’s an outrage!

If there were ever a more “First World problem” for the Zika-plagued, water-polluted Rio Olympics, it’s Brazil’s lack of access to the hit mobile game, which has united players the world over.

Since debuting to wild adulation in the U.S., Australia and New Zealand this month, the game from Google spinoff Niantic Inc. has spread like wildfire, launching in more than 30 countries or territories — but not Brazil.

For athletes and other visitors caught up in the wave, not having access is just one more knock against an Olympics that officials are racing to get ready. The opening ceremony takes place next Friday.

“I wish I could run around in the (athletes’) village catching Pokemon,” New Zealand soccer player Anna Green said Friday. “I just can’t get it on the phone. It’s fine, but it would have been something fun to do.”

What will she do instead? “Train,” she replied.

Niantic didn’t reply to a request for comment on when the game might be released in Brazil. And though social media rumors point to a Sunday release for the game, similar rumors in Japan resulted in heightened expectations and the sense of delay before its debut there last week.

This week, British canoer Joe Clarke tweeted — with a broken-hearted sad face — a screenshot of his player on a deserted map near the rugby, equestrian and modern pentathlon venues in Rio’s Deodoro neighborhood. The map was devoid of PokeStops — fictional supply caches linked to real-world landmarks. No Pokemon monsters to catch either: There was nary a Starmie nor a Clefairy to be found.

“Sorry guys no #pokemon in the Olympic Village,” tweeted French canoer Matthieu Peche, followed by three crying-face emoji. Getting equal billing in his Twitter stream was a snapshot of a letter of encouragement from French President Francois Hollande.

Players with the app already downloaded elsewhere appear to be able to see a digital map of their surroundings when they visit Rio. But without PokeStops or Pokemon, the game isn’t much fun. It would be like getting on a football field — soccer to Americans — but not having a ball to kick or goals to defend.

Many competitors in the athletes’ village took it in stride, though. Canadian field hockey player Matthew Sarmento said it would give him more time to meet other athletes. But he would have welcomed Pokemon during downtime in competition, adding that “sometimes it’s good to take your mind off the important things and let yourself chill.”

Athletes might not get Pokemon, but they’ll have access to 450,000 condoms, or three times as many as the London Olympics. Of those, 100,000 are female condoms. Officials deny that it’s a response to the Zika virus, which has been linked to miscarriages and birth defects in babies born to women who have been infected.

In Pokemon countries like the U.S., PokeStops are being used to attract living, breathing customers. In San Francisco, for example, dozens of bars, restaurants and coffee shops have set up lures that attract rare Pokemon, along with potential new patrons looking to catch them.

That’s presumably one reason why Rio Mayor Eduardo Paes — plagued by a host of bad news from player robberies to faulty plumbing — urged Niantic investor Nintendo to release the game in Brazil.

“Everybody is coming here. You should also come!” Paes wrote in Portuguese on his Facebook page , adding the hashtag #PokemonGoNoBrasil — “Pokemon Go” in Brazil.

His post generated responses such as this: “The aquatic Pokemon died with superbugs.”

Paes didn’t respond to requests for interviews.

One video circulating virally, with more than 3.5 million views, shows one fan identifying himself as Joel Vieira questioning how Brazil can host the Olympics but not Pokemon.

“I can’t play! I am not allowed to know how it really feels to see the little animals on my cell phone,” he said on the video . “Because we don’t have it in Brazil, yet. But we are having the Olympics.”

The Olympics kick off next Friday. Will Pikachu be there to witness it? The world is watching with baited Poke-breath.

MORE: Not everyone unhappy with Olympic Village