Mo Farah spent 4 days in hospital after collapse

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Olympic distance running champion Mo Farah collapsed in a bathroom after a hard training run in Park City, Utah, and was hospitalized for four days last month.

His coach, three-time New York City Marathon champion Alberto Salazar, said paramedics initially thought Farah was having a heart attack, he told the Oregonian.

“In my mind I’m thinking, ‘Is this like Hank Gathers?'” Salazar told the newspaper. “Is this a heart defect that has been there all along.”

Gathers was a star Loyola Marymount basketball player who collapsed during a game in 1990 and died due to a heart condition.

The Brit Farah, the Olympic and World champion in the 5000m and 10,000m, told the BBC he had a tooth removed before the training run and collapse, and that the area of his mouth had become infected. Unable to eat solid food, he was likely dehydrated and weak, Salazar told the Oregonian.

Farah said he returned from his run and collapsed in a bathroom, “completely knocked out.”

He said his phone was on him, so when Farah woke up, he called his training partner, who helped him into a bed. Farah was taken to a Park City hospital, then airlifted to a Salt Lake City trauma center, according to the Oregonian.

“It was scary at times,” Farah said. “But at the same time, things happen and you deal with it.”

Farah then pulled out of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland.

He is scheduled to run the 5000m and 10,000m at the European Championships in Zurich this week.

Five takeaways from U.S. Swimming Championships

Yuzuru Hanyu wins record fourth straight Grand Prix Final; Nathan Chen on podium

Yuzuru Hanyu
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Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu became the first singles skater to win four straight Grand Prix Finals, while 17-year-old Nathan Chen is the second-youngest men’s medalist in the event’s 22-year history.

The Olympic champion Hanyu held on to win despite scoring 10 points fewer than Chen in the free skate in Marseille, France, on Saturday. Chen finished second, 11.05 points behind.

Chen landed four quadruple jumps in his free skate with no falls. Hanyu fell once and singled a Lutz.

Chen, in his first senior season, became the first U.S. men’s medalist at the Grand Prix Final since Evan Lysacek and Johnny Weir earned gold and bronze in 2009.

Only Russian Yevgeny Plushenko won a men’s Grand Prix Final medal at a younger age, a bronze at 16 in the 1998-99 season.

U.S. champion Adam Rippon fell three times Saturday and finished last of six skaters.

Chen, the darling attraction of the 2010 U.S. Championships at age 10, is now the clear favorite going for the U.S. Championships in January.

NBCSN will air Grand Prix Final coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

MORE: Javier Fernandez builds toward last Olympic chance

Men’s Results
GOLD: Yuzuru Hanyu (JPN) — 293.90
SILVER: Nathan Chen (USA) — 282.85
BRONZE: Shoma Uno (JPN) — 282.51
4. Javier Fernandez (ESP) — 268.77
5. Patrick Chan (CAN) — 266.75
6. Adam Rippon (USA) — 233.10

Yevgenia Medvedeva repeats as Grand Prix Final winner, misses Yuna Kim record

Yevgenia Medvedeva
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Russian Yevgenia Medvedeva extended one of the most dominant runs in recent history, repeating as Grand Prix Final champion on Saturday.

Medvedeva recovered from stepping out of her opening jump — a shocking error for her — to total 227.66 points, the second-highest score under an 11-year-old judging system. The 17-year-old just missed Yuna Kim‘s record 228.56 from the 2010 Olympics.

Medvedeva, who last lost in November 2015, won by 9.33 points over Japan’s Satoko Miyahara in Marseille, France. Russian Anna Pogorilaya was third, followed by Canadian Kaetlyn Osmond.

Miyahara, Pogorilaya and Osmond all tallied personal-best free skates.

Medvedeva made that early mistake skating to music from “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” a 2011 film relating to the 9/11 attacks. It’s a controversial program choice that includes, at one point, the voice of George W. Bush declaring that two airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center.

“I’m happy, but I’m so sad about my mistake on my first jump,” Medvedeva said.

Nobody has finished within five points of Medvedeva during this winning streak, which included the 2016 European and World Championships and this perfect Grand Prix season. She’s seeking the first perfect season, including Grand Prix Final and world titles, since countrywoman Irina Slutskaya in 2004-05.

No U.S. woman qualified for the Grand Prix Final for the first time since 2008.

NBCSN will air Grand Prix Final coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

MORE: Javier Fernandez builds toward last Olympic chance

Women’s Results
GOLD: Yevgenia Medvedeva (RUS) — 227.66
SILVER: Satoko Miyahara (JPN) — 218.33
BRONZE: Anna Pogorilaya (RUS) — 216.47
4. Kaetlyn Osmond (CAN) — 212.45
5. Maria Sotskova (RUS) — 198.79
6. Yelena Radionova (RUS) — 188.81