Lily Zhang

U.S. roster for Youth Olympics includes London Olympian

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The U.S. roster of 92 athletes for the Nanjing Youth Olympics includes one London Olympian, a four-woman basketball team and more entrants in rugby than any other sport.

Lily Zhang, a London Olympic table tennis player at age 16, headlines the U.S. team for the second edition of the Games, which include athletes ages 14 to 18. The Opening Ceremony is Saturday.

NBC Olympics coverage of Youth Olympics

Zhang is the first American to compete in the Olympics and then compete in the Youth Olympics.

Four Americans who competed at the first Youth Olympics in Singapore in 2010 went on to become London Olympians — Ariel Hsing (table tennis), Miranda Leek (archery), Alex Massialas (fencing) and Savannah Vinsant (gymnastics).

Five Americans who competed at the first Youth Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, in 2012 went on to become Sochi Olympians — Aaron Blunck (freestyle skiing), Summer Britcher (luge), Sean Doherty (biathlon), Arielle Gold (snowboarding) and Tucker West (luge).

There are four women’s basketball players because three-on-three is the sport’s discipline in Nanjing (plus a dunk contest for boys and shootout contest for girls).

Rugby is debuting at the Youth Olympics two years before it returns to the Olympics for the first time since 1924.

Here’s the full U.S. roster:

Basketball
De’Janea Boykin
Napheesa Collier
Arike Ogunbowale
Katie Lou Samuelson

Boxing
Martha Fabela
Jajaira Gonzalez
Shakur Stevenson
Darmani Rock

Canoe/Kayak
Jordan Sherman

Diving
Dashiell Enos 
Gracia Leydon Mahoney

Fencing
George Haglund
Sabrina Massialas
Karol Metryka
Catherine Nixon
Justin Yoc

Gymnastics
Nicole Ahsinger
Cody Gesuelli
Alec Yoder
Laura Zeng

Judo
Adonis Diaz

Modern Pentathlon
Brendan Anderson

Rowing
Marlee Blue
Benjamin Cohen
Liam Corrigan
Dana Moffat

Rugby
Tess Feury
Haley Langan
Appau Mailau
Michel Navarro
Dana Olsen
Tiffany Person
Emily Prentice
Kat Ramage
Becca Jane Rosko
Richelle Stephens
Danielle Walko-Siua
Whitney Wilson
Cian Barry
Hanco Germishuys
Brian Hannon
Junior Helu
Vili Helu
Sione Masoe
Aaron Matthews
Malcolm May
Suwaiter Poch
Tyler Sousley
Austin Taefu
Jojo Tikoisuva

Sailing
Henry Marshall
Maximo Nores

Swimming
Patrick Conaton
Hannah Moore
Patrick Mulcare
Courtney Mykkanen
P.J. Ransford
Meghan Small
Clara Smiddy
Justin Wright

Table Tennis
Krishnateja Avvari
Lily Zhang

Taekwondo
Kendall Yount

Tennis
Sofia Kenin
Alexander Rybakov

Track and Field
Kenneth Brinson
Brittny Ellis
Emma Fitzgerald
Rhesa Foster
Andrew James
Brandee Johnson
Amere Lattin
Noah Lyles
Myles Marshall
Tyler Merkley
Janae Moffitt
Janie O’Connor
Chinne Okoronkwo
Kimani Rushing
Haley Showalter
Jeffrey Uzzell

Triathlon
Stephanie Jenks
Seth Rider

Beach Volleyball
Skylar Caputo
Zana Muno
T.J. DeFalco
Louis Richard

Weightlifting
Deirdre Lenzsch
Ryan Sennett

Wrestling
Daton Fix
Mason Manville
Cade Olivas

NBC Olympics, Universal Sports announce Youth Olympics coverage

Russian Olympic medalists gifts include racehorse

Abdulrashid Sadulaev
AP
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MOSCOW (AP) — Luxury cars, apartments, even a racehorse — being an Olympic medalist in Russia can come with great material rewards but also controversy.

Under President Vladimir Putin, it’s become a tradition for Russia’s Olympic heroes to be showered with large cash sums and sometimes unwanted gifts.

On Friday, less than 24 hours after dozens of medalists were presented with BMW cars at the Kremlin by Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, an advertisement appeared online offering one of them for sale, with photographs showing the car still covered in stickers celebrating Russia’s medal haul in Rio.

The advertisement offering the BMW X6 for 4.67 million rubles ($72,000) was anonymous and quickly withdrawn. It couldn’t be independently verified by The Associated Press, though Russian agency R-Sport claimed the seller was a Russian medalist who thought the car was too big and unwieldy.

Figure skater Maxim Trankov, who received a Mercedes-Benz SUV for his gold medal in 2014, said few Olympians could afford to own such cars.

“Has no one thought that these gift cars are not only liable for the tax on luxury items, but also aren’t cheap to run and earnings can’t cover it?” he wrote on Twitter. “I’d sell mine too if it came to it … Or does everyone think all sports pay as well as soccer, hockey or tennis?”

Gymnast Seda Tutkhalyan said she wouldn’t be able to drive her new BMW because at 17 years of age she was too young to have a license.

While online commenters mostly supported an athlete’s right to sell expensive Olympic gifts, many were critical of the government for a display of conspicuous consumption at the Kremlin at a time when Russia’s pension and healthcare systems are under financial strain.

It’s not fully clear how much the prizes have cost the Russian government.

State TV channel Rossiya 24 reported that the fleet of BMWs was provided by the Olympians’ Support Fund, which is backed by a group of Russia’s richest men, but that the accompanying cash prizes of tens of thousands of dollars per medalist came in part from the federal budget.

More awards are on offer from regional governments, many of which made public displays of generosity despite financial troubles of their own.

The Caucasus region of North Ossetia last month promised a free apartment for any medalists from the area, though it isn’t clear if this has happened yet.

In another grand gesture, the head of the restive Dagestan region gave Olympic wrestling champion Abdulrashid Sadulaev 6 million rubles ($93,000) in cash and a racehorse at a lavish welcoming ceremony featured on local TV.

Still, all may not be well for Sadulaev, who’s nicknamed the “Russian Tank” for his habit of crushing opponents on the wrestling mat. He’s already facing an allegation from a Moscow radio presenter of reckless driving in his eye-catching BMW.

MORE: Putin slams Russia’s Paralympic ban

Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic venue progress video

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The next Olympics, the Pyeongchang Winter Games, are in 530 days.

Organizers of the first Winter Olympics in South Korea published a time-lapse video of venue construction on Thursday.

The video shows updates for the main coastal Olympic Park, including short- and long-track speed skating, figure skating and hockey arenas, the sliding center in the mountains and the Olympic Plaza, which will house the Olympic Stadium for Opening and Closing Ceremonies.

As NBC News reported, one concern is a potential lack of natural snow, which 2010 and 2014 Winter Games organizers had to deal with as well. Man-made snow is always a safety-net option.

MORE: Pyeongchang 2018 mascots unveiled