Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte

Michael Phelps enters 5 events at Pan Pacific Championships

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The Pan Pacific Championships psych sheets are out, providing a look at which events the U.S.’ best swimmers are entered in at the biggest international meet of the year.

Michael Phelps is entered in five events — the 100m backstroke, 100m butterfly, 100m freestyle, 200m freestyle and 200m individual medley. Of course, he could pull out of any of them between now and the start of the meet Thursday.

These are the events Phelps has focused on the most since coming out of a 20-month competitive retirement in April. Phelps went winless at the U.S. Championships last week for the first time since the 2000 Olympic Trials.

Phelps’ longtime rival, Ryan Lochte, is entered in the same five events plus the 200m backstroke. Lochte won one event at Nationals, the 200m individual medley over Phelps.

Times from the U.S. Championships and Pan Pacific Championships will determine the U.S. roster for the 2015 World Championships in Kazan, Russia. No more than two Americans can qualify for the A finals of an individual event at Pan Pacs, though many more can swim in the preliminary heats.

Pan Pacs are in Gold Coast, Australia, which is 14 hours ahead of Eastern time, and run through Aug. 24 in the pool. The open-water competition at Pan Pacs is Aug. 25.

Missy Franklin is entered in the same four individual events she swam the finals in at the 2013 World Championships — the 100m backstroke, 100m freestyle, 200m backstroke and 200m freestyle. Franklin won the first three at the U.S. Championships and was second to Katie Ledecky in the 200m free.

Ledecky, who has broken 400m, 800m and 1500m freestyle world records this year, is entered in the 100m free, 200m free, 400m free, 800m free and 1500m free.

The U.S.’ biggest competition will come from host and longtime rival Australia.

World 100m free champion James Magnussen is entered in the 50m free and 100m free. He is slated to go up against the U.S. Olympic champion in the 100m free, Nathan Adrian, in both events.

Sisters Cate and Bronte Campbell are the top two seeds in the 50m free and 100m free, creating tough competition for Franklin in the latter.

Christian Sprenger, the World champion in the 100m breaststroke, is out of Pan Pacs with a shoulder injury. That means American Kevin Cordes‘ biggest threats will come from Japan.

Japan’s roster does not include the most decorated breaststroker of all time, Kosuke Kitajima, who failed to qualify for the team. Nor does it include 200m breast world record holder Akihiro Yamaguchi.

Japan’s biggest star is Kosuke Hagino, who won Worlds silver in the 400m free and 200m IM at age 18 last year. Hagino is entered in the 200m back, 200m free, 200m IM, 400m free and 400m IM.

South Korea’s four-time Olympic medalist Park Tae-hwan is in the 100m, 200m and 400m freestyles.

Brazil’s roster does not include its most decorated swimmer, Cesar Cielo. South Africa did not send Olympic champions Cameron van der Burgh and Chad le Clos. China’s team is missing Olympic champions Sun Yang and Ye Shiwen.

Janet Evans sees parallels with Katie Ledecky

Dan Jansen explains recent flurry of world records

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Dan Jansen has significant experience rewriting the speed skating world record book.

The 1994 Olympic 1000m champion broke the 500m world record in 1992, and then lowered his mark another four times. He also set world records in the 1000m and sprint combination.

Yet even Jansen is shocked by the number of edits to the record book over the last two weeks.

“I haven’t seen anything like it,” Jansen said. “Not this many.”

Four world records were broken this past weekend at the World Cup in Kearns, Utah. The weekend before, world records in three Olympic events fell at the season-opening World Cup in Calgary.

There is no surprise about the locations of the record-breaking performances.

The Utah Olympic Oval claims to have the “fastest ice on earth,” and for good reason. The venue is located 4,675 feet above sea level. At such a high altitude, the air is less dense, meaning speed skaters experience less air resistance and are therefore able to achieve faster speeds.

It is the same reason baseball players hit more home runs at the Colorado Rockies’ stadium, Coors Field, and football kickers are able to make longer field goals when they travel to play the Denver Broncos.

The Calgary Olympic Oval is also at a high altitude, although not as high as at the venue in Kearns. All of the current Olympic event world records have been set in either Utah or Calgary.

What is surprising, however, is the large number of world records broken during a two-week stretch.

Brittany Bowe started the revision of the record book by breaking her own women’s 1000m world record on Nov. 14 in Calgary. Just three minutes later, her U.S. Olympic teammate, Heather Richardson, claimed the world record for herself. Then, this past Sunday in Utah, Bowe broke the world record once again. NBCSN will televise the coverage from Utah this Friday at 7:30 p.m. ET, with Jansen providing the commentary.

Richardson also stole a world record from Bowe in the women’s 1500m. Bowe broke the world record on Nov. 15, only to have Richardson lower the time on Nov. 21.

“It’s pretty easy to tell that we bring out the best in each other,” Bowe said to U.S. Speedskating on Sunday. “When we’re racing together something special happens almost every time.”

In the men’s competition, Russia’s Pavel Kulizhnikov broke the 500m world record  on Nov. 15, and lowered it again on Nov. 20. Canada’s Ted-Jan Bloemen shattered the men’s 10,000m world record, taking 5.39 seconds off Sven Kramer’s mark from 2007.

Jansen attributes the women’s world records to the continued development of Bowe and Richardson. Both are converted inline skaters who have become more confident racing on the ice.

Bowe started inline skating when she was eight years old. After graduating from high school, she was offered the opportunity to move to Utah to transition to speed skating for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics. But she decided hang up her inline skates to focus on playing collegiate basketball at Florida Atlantic University.

She only started speed skating after being inspired by watching Richardson compete at the 2010 Games.

“Brittany learns more almost daily,” Jansen said. “She is still going to get better.”

Richardson quickly adjusted to racing on the ice, despite being described as “Bambi on ice” when she first started speed skating in 2007. She married Dutch distance skater Jorrit Bergsma in 2015 and moved to the Netherlands. Richardson’s endurance has improved since she started training with her husband, the 2014 Olympic 10,000m champion.

“Those two ladies are dominant right now,” Jansen said about Bowe and Richardson. “It is hard to see anybody else closing the gap they have in the middle distances.”

Jansen, the first speed skater to break 36 seconds in the 500m, seemed surprised that it took so long for the men’s 500m and 10,000m world records to fall. Canada’s Jeremy Wotherspoon held the men’s 500m world record since Nov. of 2007. Kramer’s 10,000m time, which was recorded in Feb. of 2007, was the longest-standing Olympic event world record.

“It’s about time,” Jansen said. “These guys are flying right now.”

No more world records are expected to be broken this season, as the rest of the competition venues are located closer to sea level. Similarly, no world records are expected to be broken at the Pyeongchang 2018 Olympics.

“It’s a little bit of a bummer because you would like to see world records at the Olympics, but our sport is not conducive to that,” Jansen said. “Unless you have the Olympics up high.”

Jansen believes U.S. Speedskating will continue to experience positive momentum.

At Sochi 2014, losing became contagious, and the U.S. contingent departed Russia with zero Olympic medals. Jansen now expects the recent success to reverberate throughout the entire team.

“It’s an exciting time for U.S. Speedskating,” Jansen said. “They are making statements, and I don’t think they are finished.”

Watch NBC Olympics Thanksgiving promo video

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Actress Eva Longoria narrates the newest NBC promo video for the Rio 2016 Olympics.

The 60-second spot features several athletes with their families in their home countries, including:

Simone Biles (USA, gymnastics)

David Boudia (USA, diving)

Genzebe Dibaba (Ethiopia, track and field)

Murilo Endres (Brazil, volleyball) and his wife Jaqueline Carvalho (Brazil, volleyball)

Dylan van Baarle (Netherlands, cycling)

Kerri Walsh Jennings (USA, beach volleyball)

The promo will air on television on Thanksgiving day towards the end of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

“The spot reflects the crucial role that family plays in the journey of so many Olympic athletes,” said John Miller, Chief Marketing Officer of NBC Sports Group. “With the Games being one of the few family-viewing experiences left on television, we felt this message was appropriate for the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.”

VIDEO: 2016 Rio Olympic Games: One year out promo