David Wilson

Can David Wilson, ex-NFL RB, make the 2016 U.S. Olympic Team?

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David Wilson‘s career in the NFL is over, but he hopes an elite professional track and field career is just beginning.

Wilson, 23, is done with football after two seasons with the New York Giants due to neck injuries. He told David Briggs on “Pro Football Talk” on NBCSN on Friday that his new goal is to make the 2016 U.S. Olympic Team in the triple jump.

Wilson, from Virginia Tech, was sixth in the triple jump at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in 2011 (personal best 16.2 meters) and could run the 100 meters in 11.01 seconds.

And he thinks he can jump farther.

“Every time I’ve been triple jumping, I’ve been in football weight,” Wilson told Briggs. “I was never really practicing triple jump. That was just God-given talent, the athletic ability I was blessed with. I think if I really focused in and honed in, I could compete with the top-tier athletes.”

How much would Wilson have to improve to be among the world’s best?

The world’s best triple jumper this year leaped 17.76m, but that’s not what to shoot for as far as making it to Rio de Janeiro in two years.

A maximum of three U.S. men can make it to the 2016 Olympics in the triple jump. The U.S. is home to the reigning Olympic gold and silver medalists — Christian Taylor and Will Claye — who have jumped 17.75m and 17.37m this year.

For 2016, the key distance is the Olympic “A” standard that must be met to have a shot to be on the U.S. team, if the process doesn’t change drastically from 2012.

In 2012, the Olympic “A” standard distance was 17.2 meters. Only Taylor and Claye reached the mark among Americans, so the U.S. was unable to send the full roster of three men’s triple jumpers to London.

Only once in the last five years has an American other than Taylor and Claye bettered 17.2m, so hitting the “A” standard should be Wilson’s goal if he’s thinking Rio.

The “A” standard may or may not be 17.2 meters, though. In 2008, it was 17.1 meters. The IAAF announced the standards for the 2012 Olympics in April 2011.

The “A” standard also can be met at a meet other than the Olympic Trials. For London 2012, the window to hit the “A” standard was from May 1, 2011 through the Olympic Trials over a year later.

Lolo Jones ends track season early

Swimmer Reece Whitley named Sports Illustrated’s Sportskid of the Year 2015

Reece Whitley
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Swimmer Reece Whitley, who earned two silver medals at the World Junior Championships earlier this summer, was named Sports Illustrated Kids’ Sportskid of the Year for 2015.

Whitley, a breaststroker, stands 6’8” at age 15 and is a sophomore at William Penn Charter School in Philadelphia. His 100m breaststroke time is 17th in the country, and his 200m time is 10th. He is the youngest swimmer to be ranked that high in both events.

“Making an impact on a young swimmer at a meet is probably more important than the times that you swim,” Whitley told SI Kids. “All these records are meant to be broken, but if you change a kid’s life or if you put a smile on a kid’s face because you took a picture with them, that never dies.”

“Getting to know Reece a little bit, he’s incredible,” 18-time Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps commented. “The guy is very talented, he’s super relaxed, super outgoing. He’s seeing results, he’s having fun, he’s enjoying himself. He’s a stud.”

Phelps has been known to call out “studs” in the past who do well in Olympic years. After the 2011 World Championships, Phelps told Jimmy Fallon that Missy Franklin was a stud, too. Then, at the 2012 Olympics, Franklin picked up four gold medals and a bronze.

Whitley beat out other four finalists for the title: taekwondo athlete Natalie Hershberger, 11; speedskater Cooper McLeod, 14; rock climber Ashima Shiraishi, 14; and cross country/ track and field athlete Harper Russell, 15.

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Olympic skater Nancy Kerrigan remembers slain Colorado officer, a childhood friend

Nancy Kerrigan
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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Former figure skating champion Nancy Kerrigan remembers the Colorado police officer who was killed in a shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic as loyal, caring and a true friend.

She told media outlets that Garrett Swasey was “one of my best friends” as they grew up together practicing figure skating in Melrose, Massachusetts. Before he became a police officer, Swasey was a junior national couples ice dancing champion.

An emotional Kerrigan says she wasn’t surprised he took a career path where he helped others first. She says he always had fun and did everything with a smile.

Swasey’s father has told the Boston Globe that his son moved to Colorado in the 1980s to pursue competitive figure skating and became an officer six years ago.

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