Missy Franklin

Missy Franklin overcomes back injury to qualify for Pan Pacs final

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Missy Franklin swam two preliminary heats in 30 minutes and advanced to the top final of the 100m backstroke at the Pan Pacific Championships on Thursday morning, two days after being helped off the pool deck with back spasms in Gold Coast, Australia.

“There’s definitely some discomfort still, but it’s getting much, much better day by day,” Franklin said after her swims, according to Swimming World.

The four-time Olympic champion decided after warm-ups that she would swim her first event, the 200m freestyle, evaluate her back and then decide if she would swim the 100m backstroke. She’s the reigning World champion in both events.

“I think we were definitely going to see how warm-up went this morning, and after this morning I really felt like I could tough it out and do both,” Franklin said, according to Swimming World. “I’m really happy that I did that. Definitely not the easiest day.”

Franklin clocked 1 minute, 57.63 seconds to finish second in her 200m free heat. She was the third-fastest American overall, and only the top two advanced to Thursday night’s A final. Franklin said she will will swim in the B final (5 a.m. ET).

She returned for the 100m back and finished second in her heat again at 1:00.60, behind Australian Belinda Hocking (1:00.45). She was the fastest American overall, earning a spot in the A final.

“Regardless of what happens I want to know that I went out there and I fought for it,” Franklin said, according to Swimming World. “If I do that, then I’ll be able to sleep regardless of the time.”

World Swimmer of the Year Katie Ledecky (1:56.45) and Shannon Vreeland (1:57.40) were the U.S. swimmers who made the A final of the 200m free. They’ll face Australians Melanie Schlanger (1:57.16) and Bronte Barratt (1:57.65) in the night session.

In other events, Conor Dwyer and Ryan Lochte advanced to the men’s 200m free final. Michael Phelps scratched both the 200m free and the 100m back Thursday and is set to make his debut at the meet Friday.

Olympic champion Matt Grevers led the qualifiers into the men’s 100m back final, followed by American Ryan Murphy and Japanese Olympic bronze medalist Ryosuke Irie.

Olympic 200m back champion Tyler Clary and Chase Kalisz qualified for the A final of the 200m butterfly after Tom Shields was disqualified.

Katie McLaughlin and 2012 Olympian Cammile Adams were the U.S. qualifiers into the top women’s 200m butterfly final.

Pan Pacs men’s preview | women’s preview

Usain Bolt would have considered 2020 Olympics if he lost medal before Rio

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If Usain Bolt had lost his 2008 Olympic relay medal before the Rio Games, instead of last month, maybe he would have considered trying for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

“Maybe if it had come before the Olympics, maybe it would have taken away a little from me, and then I would have thought about [2020],” Bolt said in a CNN interview published Monday of dropping from nine Olympic golds to eight due to teammate Nesta Carter‘s doping, “but the fact that I got the chance to say, ‘the triple-triple,’ kind of made me feel good.”

In Rio, Bolt completed his “triple-triple” at his final Olympics, sweeping the 100m, 200m and 4x100m titles at a third straight Games. Bolt raced with the knowledge that Carter had failed retests of 2008 Olympic samples but had yet to receive any punishment.

Five months later, the triple-triple was no more.

On Jan. 25, the IOC announced teammate Nesta Carter was retroactively disqualified from the Beijing Games. Carter was on Jamaica’s 4x100m relay team in Beijing, so the entire team was stripped of medals, including Bolt.

Carter is appealing his punishment.

Carter also joined Bolt on gold-medal-winning 4x100m relays at the 2012 Olympics and the world championships in 2011, 2013 and 2015. Carter was not disqualified from those meets like he was the 2008 Beijing Games.

Bolt said he had no fear or worry about the possibility of having to return more relay gold medals.

“Even if I lose all my relay gold medals, for me, I did what I had to do, my personal goals,” Bolt said in the CNN interview that appeared to take place two weeks ago in Monaco. “That’s what counts.”

Bolt also said he had not spoken to Carter since the ruling was handed down.

“My friends have asked me what I’m going to say [to Carter], but I don’t know,” Bolt said, repeating that he had no hard feelings toward Carter.

Bolt’s next scheduled meet is the Racers Grand Prix in Kingston on June 10, but he could (and likely will given his past) sign up for another race between now and then.

MORE: Bolt meets Michael Phelps, predicts when 100m world record will fall

Lindsey Vonn among Olympic medalists in documentary about gender in sports

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Olympic medalists Lindsey VonnHilary Knight and Ann Meyers-Drysdale will feature in TOMBOY, an hourlong, multi-platform documentary project aiming to elevate the conversation about gender in sports.

TOMBOY, which will premiere in March, is told through the voices of many of the world’s most prominent female athletes, broadcasters and sports executives.

It will air across all NBC Sports Regional Networks, NBCSN and select NBC-owned TV stations (check local listings). Clips can be found here. More information can be found here.

In an interview clip, Vonn discusses a challenge unique to her sport — fear.

“In my sport, you can’t be afraid,” said the 2010 Olympic downhill champion, who continues to come back from high-speed crashes and major injuries. “Ski racing is an incredibly dangerous sport. It definitely would not be safe if you were afraid of going 90 miles per hour.”

Knight, a two-time Olympic silver medalist, said that at age 5 one of her grandmothers told her that girls don’t play hockey.

“Since age 5, I’ve been working toward an Olympic dream,” said Knight, the MVP of the last two world championships. “Fifteen years later, I ended up at my first Olympic Games.”

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VIDEO: Vonn crashes out of World Cup super-G