Boris Teddy

U.S. coach aids Solomon Islands triathlete in Youth Olympic sportsmanship

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The Olympic spirit was present at the Youth Olympic triathlon competition in Nanjing.

U.S. coach Ian Murray saw the condition of the bike belonging to Solomon Islands triathlete Boris Teddy and decided something had to be done.

“It was sort of the best bike in the Solomon Islands, as I understand it, so it was sent here, but it wasn’t adequate,” Murray said, according to the Youth Olympics Information Service. “The wheel was bent. It was very heavy. The components were very old. It was just a slow bike.”

Murray had brought his own bike to China. So he lent it to Teddy to compete with.

“The facilities in my country are not really good,” Teddy said, according to the report. “For my riding exercise, the roads are bad. We don’t have good roads in the Solomon Islands. There are many potholes and trucks, so I usually train in the morning and evening when it’s a bit quieter.

“For swimming, we don’t have pools, so I swim in the ocean. As for coaches, in preparation for this competition, I didn’t have coaches. I prepared myself.”

Teddy used the bike as part of the mixed relay final, where he teamed with three other athletes (one man, two women) from other nations (Zimbabwe, Bermuda). They finished 16th out of 16 teams, but Teddy said Murray’s bike was much better than his bent one.

“Now that I’ve seen how the others race, and now that I’ve raced against them, I see how they go when swimming, riding and running,” the triathlete said, according to the report. “So now when I go back to the Solomon Islands I have to train harder so that I can catch up to them, to their level.”

NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra‘s coverage of the Youth Olympics continues Friday from 1:30-3:30 p.m. ET and Saturday from 9-11 p.m. ET.

Youth Olympics broadcast schedule

Tara Lipinski, Johnny Weir back Gracie Gold for discussing weight in figure skating

SPOKANE, WA - APRIL 23:  Gracie Gold of Team North America competes in the Ladie's Free Program on day 2 of the 2016 KOSE Team Challenge Cup at Spokane Arena on April 23, 2016 in Spokane, Washington.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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NBC Sports figure skating analysts Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir supported Gracie Gold‘s transparency in her comments about weight and figure skating.

“These are thoughts that every skater’s thinking about, but I think you don’t [see skaters] talk about it because in reality saying you need to lose weight when you’re already thin is a bit crazy,” Lipinski said. “In figure skating, gymnastics, ballet, there is always this pressure to be very thin, not only for aesthetics, but just for your actual sport and how you use your body. Weight definitely does play an issue. In skating, you’re three times your weight in the air, and you’re landing on one foot on a tiny blade.”

Lipinski and Weir said they struggled with weight issues while skating. They became too thin.

“Being a skater, I understand where Gracie was coming from,” Weir said. “To the masses, whenever you talk about diet and food and getting in shape physically, when you are an athlete on TV and you look like you are in shape compared to most of the country, it can be a little bit of a disconnect between the athletes appearing on TV and the audience.”

Weir lauded Gold for not only being open about not being at peak fitness — after taking much of the summer off — but also to compete at a top-level event like Skate America under those circumstances. (Gold said she considered skipping the Grand Prix season.)

“It’s all about telling the truth, saying, ‘I’m not in shape. I’m not there yet, but just wait, and I’ll give it to you,'” Weir said.

Weir said it could lead to more open discussions in the sport.

“You hope that, over time, you can start to look at the skaters that have been great champions and realize everyone has a different body type,” Lipinski said.

MORE: Figure skating season broadcast schedule

Matthew Centrowitz, Michelle Carter win USATF Athlete of the Year honors

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 20:  Matthew Centrowitz of the United States reacts after winning gold in front of Taoufik Makhloufi of Algeria and Nicholas Willis of New Zealand in the Men's 1500 meter Final on Day 15 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium on August 20, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)
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Olympic champions Matthew Centrowitz and Michelle Carter were voted USA Track and Field’s Athletes of the Year, the first of their kinds to win the awards.

Centrowitz, who became the first American to win an Olympic 1500m since 1908, took the Jesse Owens Award. He’s the first male track distance runner to win a USATF Athlete of the Year, which was established in 1981.

Centrowitz beat out fellow Rio gold medalists Kerron Clement (400m hurdles), Ryan Crouser (shot put), Ashton Eaton (decathlon) and Jeff Henderson (long jump).

Carter, the first U.S. woman to win the Olympic shot put, earned the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Award. She’s the first female shot put thrower to win Athlete of the Year and third thrower of any kind (John Godina, Stephanie Brown Trafton).

Carter topped other gold medalists Tianna Bartoletta (long jump), Dalilah Muhammad (400m hurdles) and Brianna Rollins (100m hurdles) in voting.

Eaton and Allyson Felix earned the awards in 2015.

A full list of USATF Athlete of the Year winners is here.

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