Hilary Knight

Hilary Knight hopes to play in NHL preseason game after Ducks practice

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Two-time U.S. Olympic silver medalist Hilary Knight said she hopes to play in an NHL preseason game one day after becoming the believed-to-be first female skater (non-goalie) to practice with a full NHL team with the Anaheim Ducks on Friday, according to the Los Angeles Times.

“I just wanted to slide in and pretend like I’m one of the guys,” Knight said, according to the newspaper. “I’m one of those women who likes to push boundaries, continue to push the envelope, and I have the frame and stature to blend in. It was a great opportunity.”

Knight, who co-led the U.S. with six points in Sochi and seven assists in Vancouver, is still on the U.S. Women’s National Team. She’s set to play in the Four Nations Cup next month.

Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said it’s “conceivable” Knight could play in an NHL exhibition at some point, according to the newspaper.

“Never say never … if she can play that well in this practice, that can happen,” Boudreau said.

Goalies have practiced and played in NHL exhibition games, most recently Canadian Olympic champion Shannon Szabados practicing with the Edmonton Oilers in March.

Szabados and Finland goalie Noora Raty currently play in men’s leagues.

Five-time Canadian Olympic forward Hayley Wickenheiser participated in Philadelphia Flyers’ prospects camps in 1998 and 1999.

Retired Canadian Olympic goalie Manon Rheaume played in NHL exhibition games in 1992 and 1993.

Here are videos and photos of Knight from Friday:

USOC expects to discuss possible Winter Olympic bid

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PARK CITY, Utah — USOC leaders are expected to discuss a possible Winter Olympic bid as early as next month.

The U.S. could bid for the 2026 or 2030 Winter Olympics. USOC CEO Scott Blackmun said it would be more difficult to bid for 2026 with the 2028 Summer Games set for Los Angeles.

Salt Lake City, Denver, Reno-Tahoe and other cities have expressed interest in bidding, Blackmun said Monday.

The USOC executive board meets Oct. 13. USOC chairman Larry Probst said they “need to talk about” a possible Winter Olympic bid and whether it could be for 2026 or 2030 or later down the line.

The USOC has focused on Summer Olympic bids since 2003. It was officially awarded the 2028 Olympics 12 days ago.

Blackmun added Monday that he hopes multiple U.S. cities could participate in the IOC’s invitational phase for possible bids over the next year. That phase is for cities to receive feedback before formally deciding to put forward a bid.

IOC members are expected to vote in 2019 to determine the 2026 Winter Olympic host.

Sion, Switzerland, is the only city to confirm bid plans.

Probst, an IOC member, also expects Innsbruck, Austria, to bid to become the first city to host the Winter Olympics three times. A public vote for a possible Innsbruck bid to move forward is scheduled for Oct. 15.

Calgary and Stockholm could also bid.

I think [IOC president] Thomas Bach has publicly stated that he would like to see the Winter Games return to a more traditional location,” Probst said. “So, to me, that’s code for Europe or North America. … We’ll have to monitor that, see what the situation looks like and then develop our strategy for whether we’re going to bid for the next Winter Games or longer than that.”

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MORE: Austria looks into multi-country 2026 Winter Olympic bid

USOC supports athletes expressing themselves after anthem protests

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PARK CITY, Utah — The U.S. Olympic Committee supports American athletes expressing themselves at winter sports events leading up to the PyeongChang Olympics.

Some MLB, NFL and WNBA players kneeled and remained in locker rooms during the national anthem at games over the weekend.

USOC CEO Scott Blackmun was asked Monday if the USOC would support American athletes peacefully protesting during the national anthem this fall and winter.

“I think the athletes that you see protesting are protesting because they love their country, not because they don’t,” Blackmun said at a pre-Winter Games media summit. “We fully support the right of our athletes and everybody else to express themselves. The Olympic Games themselves, there is a prohibition on all forms of demonstrations, political or otherwise. And that applies no matter what side of the issue you’re taking, no matter where you’re from. … But we certainly recognize the importance of athletes being able to express themselves.”

Blackmun mentioned Tommie Smith and John Carlos‘ raised-fist salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. The USOC has honored Smith and Carlos. They visited the White House last year with the Rio Olympic team.

“That was a seminal moment not only for the Olympic Movement, but for the U.S. Olympic team,” Blackmun said of the 1968 podium gesture. “Our stance on this has been fairly clear. We certainly recognize the rights of the athletes to express themselves.”

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