Jackie Galloway
Getty Images

Jackie Galloway is first to qualify for 2016 U.S. Olympic taekwondo team

Leave a comment

Jackie Galloway, a 2012 Olympic alternate for Mexico, is the first member of the 2016 U.S. Olympic taekwondo team.

The 19-year-old qualified via her World Taekwondo Federation Olympic ranking — being in the top six in the 67-plus kilogram weight class after this past weekend’s Grand Prix Final in Mexico City.

“My goal is to win gold at the Olympics,” Galloway said, according to TeamUSA.org. “And that’s not just my goal, that’s my plan.”

Galloway, a Southern Methodist mechanical engineering sophomore whose Twitter handle is @ikick_urface, this year earned World Championships bronze, Pan American Games gold and finished fourth at the Grand Prix Final.

The dual citizen and native Texan trained for the 2012 Olympics in Mexico City and moved back to the U.S. after missing the London Games.

The U.S. has won medals at all four Olympic taekwondo tournaments — the sport debuted at Sydney 2000 — but Galloway is the first U.S. men’s or women’s heavyweight division athlete to qualify for an Olympics.

Five of the eight U.S. Olympic taekwondo medals were won by members of the Lopez family — Mark, Steven and Diana.

Steven Lopez, the lone U.S. Olympic taekwondo champion, has made all four U.S. Olympic taekwondo teams. The 37-year-old reached the World Championships quarterfinals in May.

Lopez and others will try to qualify for Rio by winning the U.S. Olympic trials in February and then placing in the top two at a Pan American qualifier in March in Mexico.

MORE: Top-ranked taekwondo athlete switches from Britain to Moldova

Athletes qualified for 2016 U.S. Olympic team
Haley Anderson (Swimming) — @Swimhaley
Carlos Balderas (Boxing)
Morgan Craft (Shooting) — @morgancraft25
Glenn Eller (Shooting) — @wgeller3
Matthew Emmons (Shooting) — @mattemmonsusa
Jackie Galloway (Taekwondo) — @ikick_urface
Vincent Hancock (Shooting) — @vincent_hancock
Gwen Jorgensen (Triathlon) – @gwenjorgensen
Michael McPhail (Shooting)
Sean Ryan (Swimming) — @seanryan92
Keith Sanderson (Shooting)
Nathan Schrimsher (Modern Pentathlon) — @pentnate5
Sarah True (Triathlon) — @sgroffy
Jordan Wilimovsky (Swimming) — @j_wilimovsky
Jennifer Wu (Table Tennis)

More of best GIFs from PyeongChang Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The 2018 Winter Games are over, but that doesn’t mean we’ll forget all the amazing heights reached by American athletes. Take a look back at a few of them here with an added twist, powered by Giphy:

18 most dominant athletes from the 2018 Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

My 18 most dominant gold medalists at the Olympics, choosing at least one from each sport. 

1. Ester Ledecka, Czech Republic, Alpine Skiing/Snowboarding
Arguably the greatest athlete on the planet after taking surprise gold in Alpine skiing’s super-G and snowboarding’s parallel giant slalom (where she was the clear favorite). The 22-year-old became the third athlete to win individual Winter Olympic gold medals in different sports, the first since 1932 and the first woman. The other two were done in cross-country skiing and Nordic combined, the latter being a mixture of ski jumping and cross-country skiing. Ledecka’s feat was certainly more impressive.

2. Marit Bjørgen, Norway, Cross-Country Skiing
The most decorated athlete at the Games with five medals, including two golds. Bigger, though, is that the 37-year-old mom broke countryman Ole Einar Bjørndalen’s record for career Winter Olympic medals, finishing with 15. She also tied Bjørndalen and Bjørn Dæhlie’s record of eight Winter Olympic titles by winning the last event of the Games, the 30km, by 109 seconds, the largest Olympic cross-country margin of victory in 38 years. In her final career Olympic race.

3. Yun Sung-Bin, South Korea, Skeleton
Under host-nation pressure, the man in the Iron Man helmet had the fastest run in each of the four heats and won by 1.63 seconds, the largest margin in Olympic skeleton history.

Read the rest of the story by clicking here