Marcel Hirscher nearly hit by falling drone camera in slalom run (video)

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The world’s best Alpine skier was nearly taken out by a drone camera in the middle of a slalom run Tuesday night.

Marcel Hirscher, the four-time reigning World Cup overall champion, was about 10 seconds into his second run of a night slalom in Madonna di Campiglio, Italy, when the camera crashed to the snow behind him, between the Austrian and the previous gate.

“This is horrible,” Hirscher said, according to The Associated Press, adding more later in a German-language blog post. “This can never happen again. This can be a serious injury.”

Hirscher appeared unfazed and finished his run, taking the lead with one skier left — first-run leader Henrik Kristoffersen of Norway. Kristoffersen went on to win the race.

Wednesday Update: The International Ski Federation has banned drone cameras from further use.

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Heavy air traffic in Italy 😳 #crazy #drone #crash #luckyme

A photo posted by Marcel Hirscher (@marcel__hirscher) on

France, Serbia among favorites in last Olympic basketball qualifiers

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Serbia and France are good enough to win men’s basketball medals at the Olympics. First, they have to get there.

The final three places in the 12-team field are on the line in the three Olympic Qualifying Tournaments next week. Serbia and France, who won silver and bronze two years ago in the Basketball World Cup, will be among the favorites to earn berths after falling short last summer.

The new format to fill out the Olympics has 18 countries still in the running for spots in Rio. Six teams will be in each tournament, and the three winners will be Brazil bound.

Some teams still trying to get there are better than a few who have already qualified. Four of the world’s top 10 will be competing, including France (5th), Serbia (6th), Turkey (8th) and Greece (10th).

The Serbs have a powerful team and home-court advantage as they try to lock up a spot that eluded them in last year’s EuroBasket.

“We still need to fine-tune our teamwork but that’s normal at this stage of preparations. We are going through this process together so that we will still be playing until the end of the OQT, and hopefully after that too,” coach Aleksandar Djordjevic told FIBA.com after his team won its three tuneup games.

Serbia hosts one tournament in Belgrade that also includes Angola and Puerto Ricoin Group A. The Czech Republic, Japan and Latvia are in Group B.

In Manila, Philippines, it’s: Turkey, Canada and Senegal in Group A; with France,New Zealand and the hosts in Group B.

The Turin, Italy field: Greece, Mexico and Iran in Group A; Italy, Croatia and Tunisiain Group B.

Each team will play the others in its group, with the top two finishers in each advancing to the semifinals. The tournament champions will then be drawn into the Olympic field, with two slated to end up in a group with the U.S.

A look at some top contenders:

BELGRADE, SERBIA

SERBIA: The hosts swept a home-and-home with France and beat Greece, another top contender, in their warmup play. Serbia has one of Europe’s top point guards in Milos Teodosic and a top young prospect in Denver Nuggets All-Rookie selection Nikola Jokic, but will miss injured Timberwolves forward Nemanja Bjelica and Spurs center Boban Marjanovic, who is a free agent.

PUERTO RICO: Longtime guards J.J. Barea of the Dallas Mavericks and Carlos Arroyo should again provide the strength for the Puerto Ricans.

MANILA, PHILIPPINES

FRANCE: Tony Parker wants to cap his international career with an Olympic medal. The French failed to earn their chance playing on home soil last summer when Spain beat them in the Eurobasket semifinals, but stand a good chance now if they can hold on until the arrival of Nicolas Batum, who is an NBA free agent and won’t be available until after he signs a contract on July 7.

TURKEY: Their tough defense, anchored by NBA center Omer Asik in the middle, always gives the Turks a chance to stay in games. They gave the U.S. its toughest test in the 2014 Basketball World Cup.

CANADA: With Timberwolves star Andrew Wiggins sitting out, the Canadians could regret not locking up a spot when they blew a late lead against Venezuela in last year’s FIBA Americas semifinals.

TURIN, ITALY

GREECE: Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks is a do-everything star and Sacramento’s Kosta Koufos a solid center for a Greek team that scored a pair of victories over Turkey during its pre-tournament schedule.

ITALY: The Italians haven’t reached the Olympics since winning silver in 2004. But they have plenty of shooting behind NBA players Danilo Gallinari and Marco Belinelli and former No. 1 pick Andrea Bargnani, a top coach in Spurs assistant Ettore Messina, and the backing of a home crowd to get them there this time.

MORE: Analyzing U.S. Olympic men’s basketball roster

Sanya Richards-Ross, running in pain, OK if she misses Olympic team

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EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Reigning Olympic 400-meter champion Sanya Richards-Ross calls them gold-medal moments, when a complete stranger walks up to her and thanks her for a career that’s included plenty of celebrations, along with some tears.

Those moments are priceless for Richards-Ross, even more so with the 31-year-old retiring after the Rio de Janeiro Games. She’s a long shot to make the American squad at the Olympic trials because of a painful big toe that’s haunted her for years and a hamstring ailment that recently surfaced.

Richards-Ross insisted she’s OK if she doesn’t make the team — that it’s just as much about soaking it all in one last time.

Still, that competitive nature is hard to switch off. The four-time Olympic gold medalist and American record holder won’t go without one final kick down the back stretch.

“As an athlete, you’re optimistic until the very end. I can’t help but be that way,” said Richards-Ross, who begins Friday with a first-round heat. “If I’m in it, I can win it. If I don’t, I’m grateful that I made it this far.”

It’s been a stroll down memory lane for Richards-Ross since she arrived in Eugene earlier in the week. She and her dad went to the track and took a casual trip around it. Her dad has been by her side through her triumphs (her crowning achievement, 400-meter gold at the 2012 London Olympics) and her heartaches (finishing third at the 2008 Beijing Games when she struggled down the stretch and was later found crying underneath the stands). Not only that, but the health concerns, too — she spent five years fighting a painful autoimmune disease called Behcet’s syndrome, only to discover it may have been misdiagnosed.

“To walk the track with my dad and reflect on this amazing journey I’ve been on felt perfect,” Richards-Ross said. “I’m trying not to get too emotional, because I need to give everything on the track.”

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Her big toe is a big reason she’s calling it a career. Before this season, she had her third surgery, but the pain remains a “10” when she runs. Her shoe company, Nike, designed a spike for her to train in to take the pressure off her foot and it helps, but the pain persists.

“There’s a quality of life thing where I don’t want to run to the point that I can’t walk,” she said. “I want to run with my kids one day and not say, ‘Well, I used to run but that was only when I was young.'”

She’s long been the gold standard in the 400 since her days at the University of Texas. She was a member of the last three 4×400 relay teams that captured Olympic gold, but an individual Olympic gold eluded her until London.

Richards-Ross would love nothing more than to defend her crown in Rio, but it’s going to be difficult with a field that includes Allyson Felixeven if she has a sore ankle — up-and-comer Courtney Okolo and Francena McCorory, to name a few. Making matters worse, Richards-Ross hurt her hamstring in a race a few weeks ago, limiting her practice time. This after finishing seventh, more than 2 seconds behind the winner, during the Prefontaine Classic in late May at Hayward Field.

“Just taking it one race at a time,” said Richards-Ross, who’s trained under legendary coach Clyde Hart.

She’s already thinking about her post-race career. At the top of the list, she’d like to start a family with her husband, NFL defensive back Aaron Ross. She’s also in the process of writing a book, owns several businesses — including a luxury car service with her husband and a salon with her sister — and wants to launch a broadcasting career.

“Be the female version of Michael Strahan, because he transitioned so well,” said Richards-Ross, who lives in Austin, Texas. “I want to do something with as much fire and passion as I did my sports career.”

While there’s a chance she could be in the U.S. relay pool if she doesn’t finish in the top three, there’s also a chance this could be it. If it is, Richards-Ross said she’s not sure how she will punctuate her final big race on the track.

“It’s impossible to rehearse for something like this,” Richards-Ross said. “I want to be in the moment and whatever my emotions lead me to do, that’s what I’m going to do.”

As for how she wants to be remembered, that’s simple: Giving every race everything she had.

“I hope that fans were inspired by my effort,” Richards-Ross said. “As I was leaving the track (Tuesday), this father tapped me on the shoulder and said to me, ‘Sanya, you’ve been such a good role model for my daughter. “‘

Another gold-medal moment.

MORE: Jeter, Symmonds out of Olympic Trials