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Johnny Quinn leaves door open for bobsled return

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As U.S. bobsledders gathered in Calgary for push championships this week, Johnny Quinn prepared for the pursuit that has taken up most of his time since he became a viral star at the Sochi Olympics — public speaking.

Quinn traveled to Oklahoma City for his latest engagement, at a Retirement Investment Advisors client appreciation event on Tuesday.

Quinn’s presence in a banquet room rather than an ice house confirms that his break from bobsled will continue one more season. Athletes must be at push championships if they intend to compete in 2016-17.

Quinn has not raced in a bobsled since the Sochi Olympics, where he gained global fame for busting through a locked bathroom door and also finished 12th as a push athlete with the No. 2 U.S. sled piloted by Nick Cunningham.

Quinn has not filed retirement paperwork.

He is leaving the door open for a run to the Pyeongchang Olympics and a possible comeback next season. He recently performed a series of tests to gauge his physical shape compared to four years ago. He was pleased with the numbers.

“We’re 18 months away from Pyeongchang, so it’s going to give us some time to make sure that my speed and strength surpass where I was in 2014,” said the 32-year-old Quinn, a former wide receiver at the University of North Texas who played four preseason games with the Green Bay Packers in 2008. “In 2018 in Pyeongchang, South Korea, I want to be on that podium.”

Whether Quinn makes it to Pyeongchang depends on two primary factors.

First, that he can earn a place on the team. Quinn must return from three years off and outperform other push athletes, including those who have been competing for most of the Olympic cycle plus recent U.S. track and field converts.

Second, that Quinn wants to make the team. He’s not fully committed to a comeback and stressed that finances will be key.

“One of the biggest challenges in Olympic sports is trying to find a way to fund your Olympic dream,” he said. “I have to make sure I can afford to compete in the Olympic year.”

Quinn said he’s about 30 percent of the way to a financial goal to dive back into bobsled. The speaking engagements, about 100 per year, have helped.

He has presented to elementary-, middle- and high-school assemblies. And Fidelity Investments. And LiftMaster, a suburban Chicago company whose products include garage-door accessories.

“A lot of what I learned within Team USA and during my time in the NFL really translates over into life in the corporate world,” Quinn said. “Bring me in to help fire them up and motivate them, give them tools and action steps.”

Quinn opens his talks with a video of his highlights from Sochi and then delivers a message — “Think Like an Olympian.” A guide is available to download on his website.

He doesn’t mind that his fame was born out of that viral moment in the athletes’ village.

“Breaking down the door opened the door to some opportunities,” Quinn said. “Had I known it was going to blow up, I would have saved some [pieces of the door], auctioned it off and give it to a charity or something.”

Tuffy Latour, who works with USA Bobsled and Skeleton as a skeleton coach, said Quinn called him last week to say he was still interested in coming back to bobsled at some point. Quinn wanted to know the steps he needed to take in the next several months to best position himself.

“He’s basically just looking to get his foot in the door,” Latour said. “He’s not planning on coming back to the sport full-time this season but next season. We’re trying to build up the ranks on the U.S. team, and having somebody like Johnny, or any of the veterans coming back these next couple years will only enhance the depth.

“If he can come back in any type of shape he was in 2013 or 2014, he’s more than welcome to come out. He knows what it takes to make the team. That’s why he’s given himself a year, I think, to get in the best shape possible.”

MORE: Tyson Gay turns to bobsled

USA Hockey to start reaching out to potential replacement players

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USA Hockey will begin reaching out to “alternate players” to determine their interest in playing for the U.S. at the women’s world championship next week amid a potential boycott by its national team.

The contact is taking place in the event a resolution cannot be reached between USA Hockey and the women’s national team in a wage dispute.

“It’s important for everyone to understand clearly that our objective is to have the players we named as the U.S. women’s national team be the ones that compete in the world championship,” said Dave Ogrean, executive director of USA Hockey, in a statement. “Productive conversations have taken place this week and are ongoing in our collective efforts to reach a resolution.”

The alternate players are in the professional NWHL and college, according to USA Today, a report that USA Hockey would not confirm.

U.S. captain Meghan Duggan has said every player in the U.S. national team player pool, plus under-18 national team players, committed to not playing at worlds unless the wage dispute is resolved.

“We are confident that they [potential replacement players] would choose not to play,” the U.S. players said in a statement.

The world championship tournament starts March 31 in Plymouth, Mich.

As of Thursday evening, no resolution has come between USA Hockey and its women’s national team. They met formally on Monday for more than 10 hours, with both sides calling it productive.

“We ask that they approve the original agreement that, the players believed, was acceptable to both parties after Monday’s meeting,” the players said in a statement. “Unless there is an agreement, the players remain resolved to bypass the defense of the world championship.”

Neither side has said when the next meeting will take place.

On Tuesday, USA Hockey said it postponed a pre-worlds camp that was to run through next Tuesday in Traverse City, Mich., and canceled a scheduled Friday exhibition against Finland.

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MORE: NHL asked for decision on Olympics by end of April

NHL asked for decision on Olympics by end of April

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International Ice Hockey Federation President Rene Fasel tells The Associated Press he needs to know by the end of April whether NHL players will be cleared to play in the South Korea Olympics next year.

NHL team owners have made it clear they don’t want to stop their season again for the Winter Games and put their stars at risk of injury. The reluctance has come up before and yet the NHL has participated in the Olympics since 1998. This time, however, there seems to be an impasse.

The head of the NHL Players Association, Donald Fehr, says the players want to participate and hopes the league will take advantage of the chance to market the game in Asia.

However, NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly says without “material change to the current status quo, NHL players will not be participating in the 2018 Winter Olympics.”

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MORE: 2018 Olympic hockey groups set