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Hillary Clinton has extensive Olympic history

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Hillary Clinton has done all of these things:

Attended a Summer Olympics
Attended a Winter Olympics
Gave a speech at an Olympic torch relay lighting at Olympia, Greece
Gave a speech at an IOC Olympic host-city vote session

Clinton is an “Olympics nut,” her then-press secretary, Lisa Caputo, said in 1996, according to USA Today.

As First Lady, Clinton traveled to the 1994 Lillehammer Winter Games and the 1996 Atlanta Games.

In 1994, Clinton was most noticed for attending the men’s downhill in Kvitfjell, bearing freezing temperatures near the finish line with Olympic sprint gold medalist Florence Griffith-Joyner.

American Tommy Moe was the surprise race winner. Last month, Moe was asked about meeting Clinton in the finish area.

“We took a photo, and she was just really unassuming and just like, ‘Congratulations, this is my [13-year-old] daughter, Chelsea,'” Moe said at the U.S. Ski Team’s Gold Medal Gala fundraiser on Wall Street. “I was on the cover of [Sports Illustrated], and they had a photo of us [in the magazine]. … I think Florence Griffith-Joyner was freezing her butt off, because it was definitely five degrees below zero.”

Moe said he later received a call from President Bill Clinton, who was not in Norway, and answered the phone with the greeting, “Hey Bill, how’s it going?”

In March 1996, Clinton flew to Greece to and spoke at the beginning of the Atlanta Olympic torch relay at the ancient Olympic site of Olympia.

“These Olympic Games, which have moved princes to lift peasants onto their shoulders, emphasize an inescapable dimension of the human experience — that we are all members of one global family,” Clinton said in Olympia, according to The Associated Press.

In July, she attended the Opening Ceremony in Atlanta, where her husband declared the Games open. Clinton and Trump were both at Centennial Olympic Stadium that night.

She later took in the action, including swimming (where she had her photo taken with the U.S. women’s 4x200m freestyle relay team), gymnastics (photo with the Magnificent Seven) and diving (sat next to Carl Lewis).

Finally in 2005, Clinton, then a U.S. Senator in New York, spoke at the IOC session that would determine the 2012 Olympic host city.

She was part of the New York City 2012 Olympic bid team, flanked by Olympic champions Oksana Baiul, Nadia Comaneci, Bob Beamon and Ian Thorpe. New York City would finish fourth out of five cities in the voting won by London.

For her 2016 presidential campaign, Clinton brought on two-time Olympic medalist figure skater Michelle Kwan as a surrogate outreach coordinator. Kwan detailed her job here.

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Eliud Kipchoge wins London Marathon; no world record (video)

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Eliud Kipchoge won his eighth straight marathon (ninth if you count Nike’s sub-two attempt), but missed the world record at a steamy London Marathon by more than one minute on Sunday.

The Kenyan Olympic champion clocked 2:04:27, pulling away from Ethiopian Tola Kitata by 33 seconds. Mo Farah, the four-time Olympic track champ in his second marathon, finished third in 2:06:32.

Kipchoge and Kitata fell off Dennis Kimetto‘s world-record pace around the 20th mile. Kimetto ran 2:02:57 at the 2014 Berlin Marathon.

Full results are here.

The temperature eclipsed 70 degrees Farenheit during the race, making it one of the hottest London Marathons ever.

No world record in the women’s race, either. Kenyan Vivian Cheruiyot won in 2:18:31, passing pre-race favorite Mary Keitany in the 23rd mile. Cheruiyot won by 1 minute, 42 seconds over countrywoman Brigid Kosgei. Keitany slowed to fifth in 2:24:27.

Cheruiyot, a 34-year-old mom, made her marathon debut in London last year, finishing fourth. Before that, Cheruiyot earned four Olympic medals on the track, plus four world titles combined in the 5000m and 10,000m.

Paula Radcliffe‘s world record with male pacers — 2:15:25 from 2003 — was a target for Keitany. Last year, Keitany broke Radcliffe’s world record without male pacers by 41 seconds, winning her third London title in 2:17:01.

The other leading contender Sunday, Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba, stopped in the 20th mile.

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon

2018 London Marathon results

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Top finishers from the 38th London Marathon (full searchable results here) …

Men’s Elite
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 2:04:27
2. Tola Kitata (ETH) 2:05:00
3. Mo Farah (GBR) 2:06:32
4. Abel Kirui (KEN) 2:07:07
5. Bedan Karoki (KEN) 2:08:34
6. Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) 2:08:53
7. Lawrence Cherono (KEN) 2:09:25
8. Daniel Wanjiru (KEN) 2:10:35
9. Amanuel Mesel (ERI) 2:11:52
10. Yohanes Gebregergish (ER) 2:12:09
17. Guye Adola (ETH) 2:32:35

Women’s Elite
1. Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) 2:18:31
2. Brigid Kosgei (KEN) 2:20:13
3. Tadelech Bekele (ETH) 2:21:30
4. Gladys Cherono (KEN) 2:24:10
5. Mary Keitany (KEN) 2:24:27
6. Rose Chelimo (BRN) 2:26:03
7. Mare Dibaba (ETH) 2:27:45
8. Lily Partridge (GBR) 2:29:24
9. Tracy Barlow (GBR) 2:32:09
10. Stephanie Bruce (USA) 2:32:28
DNF. Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)

Men’s Wheelchair
1. David Weir (GBR) 1:31:15
2. Marcel Hug (SUI) 1:31:15
3. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) 1:31:16
4. Josh George (USA) 1:31:24
5. Kurt Fearnley (AUS) 1:31:24

Women’s Wheelchair
1. Madison de Rozario (AUS) 1:42:58
2. Tatyana McFadden (USA) 1:42:58
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) 1:43:00
4. Manuela Schar (SUI) 1:43:01
5. Amanda McGrory (USA) 1:43:04

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon