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Charges against ex-USA Gymnastics doctor ‘tip of the iceberg,’ attorney general says

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MASON, Mich. (AP) — A former USA Gymnastics team doctor pleaded not guilty Tuesday to three counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct in his home with a girl under 13, charges that Michigan’s attorney general said may be the “tip of the iceberg” as authorities investigate roughly 50 complaints.

Larry Nassar, who was arrested Monday while running an errand at a Lansing-area tire store, was arraigned by video from jail. He was released after 10 percent of a $1 million bond was paid, more than two months after two gymnasts — including a member of the 2000 U.S. women’s Olympic team — accused him of sexual abuse during medical treatments.

The alleged assaults against the girl occurred between 1998 and 2005, from the age of 6 until she was 12. She was not a gymnast, patient or family member, said Attorney General Bill Schuette.

He said Nassar, a former associate professor of osteopathic medicine at Michigan State University who lives in Holt in suburban Lansing, committed “predatory, menacing” acts and “stole this young lady’s childhood.”

“This is the tip of the iceberg,” Schuette said during a news conference Tuesday.

University police chief James Dunlap said his department has received roughly 50 complaints.

“We’re dealing with decades of effort to go back and identify witnesses and to compile those for submission to the attorney general’s office,” he said.

Ingham County 55th District Court Magistrate Mark Blumer ordered Nassar to wear an electronic tether and to surrender his passport. He also was prohibited from being present with anyone under 18, including his children, unless another adult is there.

A preliminary exam was scheduled for Dec. 15.

Nassar, who could face life imprisonment if he is convicted, has denied wrongdoing.

Shannon Smith, one of his lawyers, said his wife — who was in the courtroom — and “hundreds of people support him 100 percent. We have received countless emails and communications from other doctors, physicians, physical therapists, ex-patients, ex-coworkers supporting him.”

Assistant state attorney general Angela Povilaitis had asked that bond be denied or, in the alternate, that a very high amount be imposed.

“She has come forward bravely to report this and to cooperate and prosecute this case,” she said.

Nassar was fired in September by Michigan State. In October, a former gymnast who was on the national team from 2006 to 2011 filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles, alleging Nassar repeatedly sexually abused her and renowned husband-and-wife coaches Bela and Martha Karolyi turned a blind eye to molestations.

Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics previously said that it cut ties with Nassar after learning of athlete concerns about him in the summer of 2015.

The attorney general, who is investigating at the request of the campus police, said his department is in the best position to prosecute instead of the local prosecutor because it is believed that potential crimes crossed into multiple jurisdictions in Michigan and possibly across state lines. He said his office is working with the FBI and federal prosecutors in Michigan.

Tyson Gay keeps sprinting in memory of 15-year-old daughter

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — She ran the 100m and 200m — just like dad. She was so fast and would’ve been a college standout. This he has no doubt.

That’s why Tyson Gay nearly walked away from racing. It was too painful with his daughter gone. So painful that when he trains he feels the stress in his back and can’t shake it off.

Only, she wouldn’t want him to quit. So he keeps sprinting in the memory of his 15-year-old daughter, Trinity , who was shot and killed in October outside a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky.

“It’s crushing and it never goes away. But you try to live with it,” said Gay , who competes in the first round of the 100m on Thursday night at the USATF Outdoor Championships. “You try to think about the good times.”

Like how she used to visit him in Florida for spring break or Thanksgiving. Or how they had the same teacher in high school and the teacher once playfully told Trinity how much better of a student she was than her father. Or how when he couldn’t spell a word, he would turn and ask her.

Out of habit, he still does that.

“I think about my daughter every day,” Gay said as he sat in a hotel lobby after a training session. “Every day.”

He didn’t hear the phone ring in the early morning hours on Oct. 16. His sister came downstairs and woke him up. Trinity was shot outside a Lexington restaurant after witnesses told police that gunfire was exchanged between two vehicles. She was hit by a stray round. There have been four charged in connection with her death.

“You’re upset you couldn’t be there to stop it,” Tyson Gay said. “It was just a group of honor students, going out to have a good time. And something like that happens? Crazy.

“I cried on the plane the whole way home. I was numb. I probably never cried that hard in my life.”

The tears keep flowing .

“The funeral, the wake, the burial, everything was unreal,” Gay said. “It’s been eight months and it still seems unreal. … I don’t think you ever have peace. I’ve learned to think about the good times, try to block that image of her death out of my mind.”

For the next month, it was hard for him to do much of anything, let alone return to track. After all, running was their thing.

Trinity was a sprinter at Lafayette High in Lexington and finished fourth in the 100m and fifth in the 200m at the state Class 3A high school track meet in May 2016. She also ran on a 4x200m relay team that finished fourth.

She never thought of herself as the daughter of Tyson Gay. She was Trinity Gay.

“I was so proud of her with that,” Gay said. “She was just a happy person. She was happy, loving and wanted to be herself. I never felt like she was in my shadow.”

He returned to training in late November more to “clear my mind and get out of the house,” he said. “You’re looking for closure every day and it doesn’t come. It’s just been tough in that sense.”

At 34, he’s not sure how many years he has left in the sprint game. This season for sure and then he will see how he feels.

Gay is the American record holder in the 100m (9.69 seconds) and he competed in the last three Summer Olympics. He was part of a team that won a silver medal in the 4x100m relay at the 2012 London Games, though that medal was ultimately stripped after Gay tested positive for steroids in 2013.

“I’ve been through every major upset and every major stresser that life can give you,” Gay said. “It’s very hard emotionally. It would’ve been easy for me to quit (track). I’m still fighting.”

She would’ve wanted him to keep running. She had a front row seat at some of his biggest meets.

“Track is something she loved. It’s something I loved,” Gay said. “I had a college coach tell me a year ago, ‘Hey man, we need your daughter to run for us.’ I told her about it and she got tickled. She thought it was so cool. That made me so proud.”

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USA Swimming National Championships broadcast schedule

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NBC Sports will air daily coverage of the USA Swimming National Championships broadcast schedule in Indianapolis next week, part of the Team USA Summer Champions Series.

Olympic gold medalists Katie LedeckyRyan MurphySimone Manuel and Lilly King are expected to headline the field at nationals, where the top two per individual event qualify for worlds in Budapest in July.

NBCSN will air live finals coverage on the first two nights Tuesday and Wednesday, with Universal HD airing the last three nights of finals. Finals start at 6 ET each night.

NBC will also air coverage Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. ET.

NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app will stream all coverage on NBCSN and NBC, plus the USA Swimming webcast on Universal HD nights.

A USA Swimming webcast will live stream all prelim sessions that begin at 9 a.m. ET daily.

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Date Time (ET) Network
Tuesday 7-8 p.m. (LIVE) NBCSN, Streaming
Wednesday 7-8 p.m. (LIVE) NBCSN, Streaming
Thursday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Friday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Saturday 1-3 p.m. NBC, Streaming
Saturday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Sunday 1-3 p.m. NBC, Streaming