Laurie Hernandez is youngest ‘Dancing with the Stars’ winner

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Olympic champion gymnast Laurie Hernandez became the youngest winner of “Dancing with the Stars” in the show’s 23rd season on Tuesday.

Hernandez, 16, and partner Val Chmerkovskiy beat IndyCar driver James Hinchcliffe and retired NFL wide receiver Calvin Johnson for the Mirror Ball Trophy in Tuesday’s finale.

“I just want to thank everyone for the support and riding along this crazy roller coaster of my life,” Hernandez, who was 4 years old when “Dancing with the Stars” debuted in 2005, said seconds after being named the winner.

She became the fifth Olympian and second gymnast to take the title, joining Apolo OhnoKristi Yamaguchi, Shawn Johnson and Meryl Davis.

Johnson was previously the youngest winner at age 17 in 2009. Nastia Liukin and Aly Raisman also competed in previous seasons, both finishing fourth.

Hernandez and Chmerkovskiy had a stellar season on the show, stringing together five straight perfect scores across three weeks starting on Halloween.

It came after she won team gold and balance beam silver at the Rio Olympics as the first U.S. female Olympian born in the 2000s.

Hernandez continues her busy week in New York City, where she’ll be part of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade (NBC, 9 a.m.-noon across all time zones).

Hernandez said after Tuesday’s show that she will join a post-series “Dancing with the Stars” tour.

VIDEO: Laurie Hernandez’s turn in the Mannequin Challenge

Olympians on ‘Dancing with the Stars’

Season 1 — Evander Holyfield (1984, boxing)
Season 4 — Apolo Ohno (2002-2010, short track speed skating) — WINNER, Clyde Drexler (1992, basketball)
Season 5 — Floyd Mayweather Jr. (1996, boxing)
Season 6 — Kristi Yamaguchi (1992, figure skating) — WINNER, Monica Seles (1996-2000, tennis)
Season 7 — Maurice Greene (2000-2004, track and field), Misty May-Treanor (2000-2012, volleyball)
Season 8 — Shawn Johnson (2008, gymnastics) — WINNER
Season 9 — Louie Vito (2010, snowboarding), Natalie Coughlin (2004-2012, swimming)
Season 10 — Evan Lysacek (2006-2010, figure skating)
Season 12 — Sugar Ray Leonard (1976, boxing)
Season 13 — Hope Solo (2004-2016, soccer)
Season 14 — Martina Navratilova (2004, tennis)
Season 15 — Shawn Johnson, Apolo Ohno
Season 16 — Dorothy Hamill (1976, figure skating), Aly Raisman (2012, 2016, gymnastics)
Season 18 — Meryl Davis (2010-2014, figure skating) — WINNER, Charlie White (2010-2014, figure skating), Amy Purdy (2014, snowboarding)
Season 19 — Lolo Jones (2008, 2012, 2014, track and field/bobsled)
Season 20 — Nastia Liukin (2008, gymnastics)
Season 23 — Laurie Hernandez (2016, gymnastics) — WINNER, Ryan Lochte (2004-2016, swimming)

Tyson Gay keeps sprinting in memory of 15-year-old daughter

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — She ran the 100m and 200m — just like dad. She was so fast and would’ve been a college standout. This he has no doubt.

That’s why Tyson Gay nearly walked away from racing. It was too painful with his daughter gone. So painful that when he trains he feels the stress in his back and can’t shake it off.

Only, she wouldn’t want him to quit. So he keeps sprinting in the memory of his 15-year-old daughter, Trinity , who was shot and killed in October outside a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky.

“It’s crushing and it never goes away. But you try to live with it,” said Gay , who competes in the first round of the 100m on Thursday night at the USATF Outdoor Championships. “You try to think about the good times.”

Like how she used to visit him in Florida for spring break or Thanksgiving. Or how they had the same teacher in high school and the teacher once playfully told Trinity how much better of a student she was than her father. Or how when he couldn’t spell a word, he would turn and ask her.

Out of habit, he still does that.

“I think about my daughter every day,” Gay said as he sat in a hotel lobby after a training session. “Every day.”

He didn’t hear the phone ring in the early morning hours on Oct. 16. His sister came downstairs and woke him up. Trinity was shot outside a Lexington restaurant after witnesses told police that gunfire was exchanged between two vehicles. She was hit by a stray round. There have been four charged in connection with her death.

“You’re upset you couldn’t be there to stop it,” Tyson Gay said. “It was just a group of honor students, going out to have a good time. And something like that happens? Crazy.

“I cried on the plane the whole way home. I was numb. I probably never cried that hard in my life.”

The tears keep flowing .

“The funeral, the wake, the burial, everything was unreal,” Gay said. “It’s been eight months and it still seems unreal. … I don’t think you ever have peace. I’ve learned to think about the good times, try to block that image of her death out of my mind.”

For the next month, it was hard for him to do much of anything, let alone return to track. After all, running was their thing.

Trinity was a sprinter at Lafayette High in Lexington and finished fourth in the 100m and fifth in the 200m at the state Class 3A high school track meet in May 2016. She also ran on a 4x200m relay team that finished fourth.

She never thought of herself as the daughter of Tyson Gay. She was Trinity Gay.

“I was so proud of her with that,” Gay said. “She was just a happy person. She was happy, loving and wanted to be herself. I never felt like she was in my shadow.”

He returned to training in late November more to “clear my mind and get out of the house,” he said. “You’re looking for closure every day and it doesn’t come. It’s just been tough in that sense.”

At 34, he’s not sure how many years he has left in the sprint game. This season for sure and then he will see how he feels.

Gay is the American record holder in the 100m (9.69 seconds) and he competed in the last three Summer Olympics. He was part of a team that won a silver medal in the 4x100m relay at the 2012 London Games, though that medal was ultimately stripped after Gay tested positive for steroids in 2013.

“I’ve been through every major upset and every major stresser that life can give you,” Gay said. “It’s very hard emotionally. It would’ve been easy for me to quit (track). I’m still fighting.”

She would’ve wanted him to keep running. She had a front row seat at some of his biggest meets.

“Track is something she loved. It’s something I loved,” Gay said. “I had a college coach tell me a year ago, ‘Hey man, we need your daughter to run for us.’ I told her about it and she got tickled. She thought it was so cool. That made me so proud.”

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USA Swimming National Championships broadcast schedule

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NBC Sports will air daily coverage of the USA Swimming National Championships broadcast schedule in Indianapolis next week, part of the Team USA Summer Champions Series.

Olympic gold medalists Katie LedeckyRyan MurphySimone Manuel and Lilly King are expected to headline the field at nationals, where the top two per individual event qualify for worlds in Budapest in July.

NBCSN will air live finals coverage on the first two nights Tuesday and Wednesday, with Universal HD airing the last three nights of finals. Finals start at 6 ET each night.

NBC will also air coverage Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. ET.

NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app will stream all coverage on NBCSN and NBC, plus the USA Swimming webcast on Universal HD nights.

A USA Swimming webcast will live stream all prelim sessions that begin at 9 a.m. ET daily.

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Date Time (ET) Network
Tuesday 7-8 p.m. (LIVE) NBCSN, Streaming
Wednesday 7-8 p.m. (LIVE) NBCSN, Streaming
Thursday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Friday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Saturday 1-3 p.m. NBC, Streaming
Saturday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Sunday 1-3 p.m. NBC, Streaming