BARCELONA, SPAIN - DECEMBER 13:  Javier Fernandez (L) of Spain and Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan pose for the media during the medals ceremony during day three of the ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final 2014/2015 at Barcelona International Convention Centre on December 13, 2014 in Barcelona, Spain.  (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
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Figure skaters qualified for Grand Prix Final

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This season’s Grand Prix Final includes every reigning world champion and five American entries.

The Grand Prix Final is the second-biggest annual competition behind the world championships. It takes the top six per discipline from the fall’s Grand Prix series.

NBC, NBCSN and Universal HD will air Grand Prix Final coverage from Marseille, France, in two weeks, along with streaming on NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app.

Here are the Grand Prix Final fields:

Men
Javier Fernández (ESP) — Won Rostelecom Cup and Trophée de France
Patrick Chan (CAN) — Won Skate Canada and Cup of China
Yuzuru Hanyu (JPN) — Won NHK Trophy, 2nd at Skate Canada
Shoma Uno (JPN) — Won Skate America, 2nd at Rostelecom Cup
Nathan Chen (USA) — 2nd at NHK Trophy, 4th at Trophée de France
Adam Rippon (USA) — 3rd at Skate America, 3rd at Trophée de France
(Alternates: Jin (CHN), Voronov (RUS), Bychenko (ISR))

The field includes every man who has won an Olympic or world title since 2011. Chan won the 2011, 2012 and 2013 World titles. Hanyu won the 2014 Olympic and World titles. Fernández is the two-time reigning world champion.

Chen and Rippon are the first American men’s singles skaters to qualify for a Grand Prix Final since 2011.

Women
Yevgenia Medvedeva (RUS) — Won Skate Canada, Trophée de France
Anna Pogorilaya (RUS) — Won Rostelecom Cup, NHK Trophy
Yelena Radionova (RUS) — Won Cup of China, 2nd at Rostelecom Cup
Kaetlyn Osmond (CAN) — 2nd at Skate Canada, 2nd at Cup of China
Maria Sotskova (RUS) — 2nd at Trophée de France, 3rd at NHK Trophy
Satoko Miyahara (JPN) — 3rd at Skate Canada, 2nd at NHK Trophy
(Alternates: Wagner (USA), Tuktamysheva (RUS), Mihara (JPN))

Four Russian women qualified for the Grand Prix Final for the third time in four years. The world champion Medvedeva hasn’t lost in a year. Pogorilaya and Radionova own world championships medals. Sotskova is the current world junior silver medalist.

No U.S. woman qualified for the Grand Prix Final for the first time since 2008.

Pairs
Meagan Duhamel/Eric Radford (CAN) — Won Skate Canada, NHK Trophy
Aliona Savchenko/Bruno Massot (GER) — Won Rostelecom Cup, Trophée de France (WITHDREW)
Yu Xiaoyu/Zhang Hao (CHN) — Won Cup of China, 2nd at Skate Canada
Peng Cheng/Jin Yang (CHN) — 2nd at Cup of China, 2nd at NHK Trophy
Yevgenia Tarasova/Vladimir Morozov (RUS) — 2nd at Trophée de France, 3rd at Skate America
Julianne Séguin/Charlie Bilodeau (CAN) — Won Skate America, 5th at Rostelecom Cup
Natalia Zabijako/Alexander Enbert (RUS) — 2nd at Cup of Russia, 4th at Trophée de France
(Alternates: Denney/Frazier, Ilyushechkina/Moscovitch)

Savchenko, a five-time world champ with Robin Szolkowy, and French-born partner Massot made their Grand Prix series debut as a pair this season but withdrew from Marseille due to Savchenko’s ankle injury. Two-time world champs Duhamel and Radford were upset at the last year’s Grand Prix Final, but the Russians who beat them won’t be in Marseille.

Ice Dance
Tessa Virtue/Scott Moir (CAN) — Won Skate Canada, NHK Trophy
Maia Shibutani/Alex Shibutani (USA) — Won Skate America and Cup of China
Gabriella Papadakis/Guillaume Cizeron (FRA) — Won Trophée de France, 2nd at NHK Trophy
Yekaterina Bobrova/Dmitry Soloviyev (RUS) — Won Rostelecom Cup, 3rd at Skate America
Madison Chock/Evan Bates (USA) — 2nd at Skate Canada, 2nd at Rostelecom Cup
Madison Hubbell/Zachary Donohue (USA) — 2nd at Skate America, 2nd at Trophée de France
(Alternates: Weaver/Poje, Gilles/Poirier, Cappellini/Lanotte)

Virtue and Moir, gold and silver medalists at the last two Olympics, posted the highest ice-dance score of all time this season in their return from a two-year break. They beat the two-time reigning world champions Papadakis and Cizeron at NHK Trophy. The U.S. put the same three couples into the Grand Prix Final in consecutive years.

MORE: U.S., world champion figure skaters join Mannequin Challenge

Dec. 8 Grand Prix Final: Men’s and Ladies Short 8-10 p.m. UniHD
Dec. 9 Grand Prix Final: Pairs Short, Short Dance 8-10 p.m. UniHD
Dec. 10 Grand Prix Final: Pairs Free 8:30-9:30 p.m. UniHD
Dec. 11 Grand Prix Final 8:30-11 p.m. NBCSN
Dec. 18 Grand Prix Final 4-6 p.m. NBC
Dec. 19 Grand Prix Final: NBC re-air 8-10 p.m. UniHD

Katie Ledecky beaten by Simone Manuel, still sets two personal bests in 25 minutes

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 09:  Gold medalist Katie Ledecky of the United States poses on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women's 200m Freestyle Final on Day 4 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)
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The legend of Katie Ledecky grows, even with a defeat.

In one of the greatest short-course-yards doubles in history, Ledecky broke the American record in the 400-yard individual medley and then lowered her personal best in the 200-yard free by a half-second in a 25-minute span at the Pac-12 Championships on Friday.

Ledecky won the Pac-12 title in the 400-yard IM by chopping three seconds off her personal best, clocking 3:57.68 in Federal Way, Wash.

About 25 minutes later, the Stanford freshman nearly came back to beat co-Olympic 100m free champion Simone Manuel in the 200-yard free final. Manuel had to cut .58 off her 200-yard free personal best to edge Ledecky by .13. Full results are here.

Manuel led by .99 after the first 50 yards, but Ledecky closed 1.2 seconds faster than Manuel in the final 50 yards. It marked Ledecky’s second defeat in a freestyle final longer than 100 meters since Jan. 18, 2014. Manuel also beat Ledecky in a 200-yard free in November.

Still, Ledecky chopped .54 off her 200-yard free personal best, touching the wall in 1:40.50.

Their anticipated rematch in the NCAA Championships in three weeks should be the event of that meet.

But the 400 IM may be more intriguing come the summer. Ledecky’s last 100 yards of freestyle in Friday’s final were 4.06 seconds faster than runner-up Ella Eastin.

The NCAA 400 IM is in a 25-yard pool. Internationally, the 400 IM is in a 50-meter pool.

Ledecky has never raced the 400m IM at a major international meet and scratched out of the event on the eve of the Olympic Trials eight months ago. She ranked fifth in the U.S. in the event in 2016 but never raced it fully tapered.

Her time on Friday was faster than the 400-yard IM personal best of Maya DiRado, who took Olympic 400m IM silver in Rio and then retired.

Ledecky could conceivably try and race the 400m IM this summer. At nationals in June, the 400m IM final is on a night where Ledecky would have no other finals. At worlds in July, the 400m IM comes on the final day of the meet (as opposed to the first day at the Olympics), also on a night where Ledecky would have no other individual events.

Earlier at Pac-12s, Ledecky lowered her American record in the 500-yard free by 1.31 seconds on Thursday, swimming faster than Ryan Lochte‘s personal best at the same age.

The Pac-12 Championships conclude Saturday.

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MORE: Chad le Clos still has nightmares of losing to Phelps

Michael Phelps ‘would probably do’ another Olympics if not for injury risk

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Michael Phelps said he would probably swim another Olympic cycle if it wasn’t for the possibility of injury, particularly with his shoulders.

“If you could guarantee me that I would never get injured in four years, and I would never have any problems with my shoulders or anything like that in four years, I’d probably do it again because I had more fun this time around,” Phelps said in a social media video Friday. “But I don’t want to risk that and not be able to spend time with Booms [son Boomer] when he grows up and watch him and be a part of every single part of his life when he gets older and older. So I think that’s something, for me, that I will never put my body through. I won’t take that chance. I think my body is way more important and my family is way more important than going another four years to swim in one more Olympics.”

Phelps’ right shoulder was a particular issue in his comeback for the Rio Olympics. He received two cortisone shots in the months before the Games, leading coach Bob Bowman to say that Phelps was “75 percent” of what he was at the 2008 Beijing Games, according to Sports Illustrated.

(Phelps has said he didn’t compete at 100 percent in Beijing, given an October 2007 broken wrist that interrupted training.)

Phelps reiterated, repeatedly as usual, during the 70-minute video that he would not return to competitive swimming. He still swims recreationally “for peace of mind” and “meditation.”

What about retirement saddens him?

“Not having the chance to represent my country anymore is something bums me out,” Phelps said, particularly hearing the national anthem atop the medal stand.

Phelps has plenty to keep him busy. The most pressing is testifying at a congressional hearing looking at improving the flawed anti-doping system in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

“I have a lot to say,” Phelps said. “To have that opportunity to speak out about my true feelings. I’ve never really, truly been able to do it.”

He began outlining those words Friday and said he had until Sunday to finish a page or a page and a half to present to the subcommittee.

“There are too many people who are cheating, that’s the easiest way to say it,” Phelps said. “Look what happened at the [Rio] Olympics, all the athletes that tested positive that were still allowed to compete. I think that’s wrong, and I think it’s unfair. I think that’s something that needs to clean.”

In Rio, Phelps praised teammate Lilly King‘s criticisms of athletes competing who had previously served doping punishments (such as King’s breaststroke rival, Russian Yuliya Yefimova). Phelps doubts he has ever competed in a clean race.

“I think you’re going to probably see a lot of people speaking out more,” Phelps said in Rio, according to The Associated Press. “I think [King] is right, I think something needs to be done. It’s kind of sad today in sports in general, not just in swimming, there are people who are testing positive who are allowed back in the sport and multiple times. It kind of breaks what sport is meant to be and that’s what pisses me off.”

Phelps said Friday that he hopes to help “clean the sports up so we can get back to why we play sports.”

“I don’t think any athlete should ever have that feeling that somebody else is at an advantage of using a performance-enhancing drug to help them,” he said. “I had these massive dreams and goals of things I wanted to accomplish and achieve, and never were they because I thought I could take an easy way by cheating. I basically just worked as hard as I could and made sure that my body was as prepared as I could possibly make it for every single meet. So I was able to accomplish the goals and dreams that I had. That’s something that I’m going to Congress to talk about.”

Phelps also added in Friday’s video that he hopes another swimmer will come along and break his records, that he was recently knocked out of a poker tournament by his wife and he will be in Budapest for the world championships in July.

Just not as a competitor.

MORE: Ledecky’s latest American record faster than Ryan Lochte at same age